Mustering & Weaning – 18 MAR 19

Weaning calves later than i had planned, but weather always trumps the best laid plans.  Despite there being a chance of rain, the temperatures are warm enough to take the chance to wean my 10-11 month old calves – about time, their mommas could use a rest before calving again as soon as the 15th of April.

With sun shining, using my best Bud William’s stockmanship, I moved the cows forward about 1/2 mile – mostly on foot because of the  mud everywhere and having to cross three deep ditches complete with sucking mud as footing.  So, although the move was slow, the cows and calves cooperated nicely and eventually all rolled into the corral, where i then began sorting cows from calves.  About half done Dallas came up to help finish sorting.  Was very glad for his help given that i’d logged about 29,000 steps in my tall rubber Lacrosse boots.  Without a doubt those boots are NOT made for walking.  At least not that much.  (Hand ‘n Hand Livestock Solutions for discovering stockmanship skills)

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Single strand electrified polybraid and electric netting make that final push to the corral uneventful for one person on foot mustering in 160 adult animals and 100 calves.
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Fenceline weaning – cows are far side of panels quietly eating hay.  Next day, they were ready to move out.  Methinks they were tired of their big babies!!
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Calves on the hillside eating hay with mommas within sight – no worries.  However, by morning, they’ll start missing her.

 

 

 

 

 

The sounds of fenceline weaning the first night.

Cheers!

tauna

My husband has weaned his calves these past two days as well.  The weather is cooperating nicely.

Wildlife Walkabout – Trumpeter Swan

Finally getting back to my idea of posting about area flora and fauna with this week’s contribution being the Trumpeter Swan.  These past several trips to my farm – Tannachton Farm – has been highlighted by these graceful and seldom sighted birds.

Missouri Department of Conservation

TRUMPETER SWANS BRING GRACE TO WINTER WATERS

Don’t miss this video from Missouri Department of Conservation:

Voice of the Trumpeter Swan in the Wild

Read up on Trumpeter Swans in this Field Guide published online by the Missouri Department of Conservation.

Trumpeter Swans are a protected species and are not to be hunted since efforts are still underway to established greater numbers of this beautiful bird.

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Traveling Chooks!

So we have some traveling hens. Brett took these chooks for a ride on the pickup to the North place, where apparently they hung out for about 15 minutes, then continued their bumpy muddy gravel road journey to Highway Y, pulled in at the Neal farm and loaded two big bales of hay then continued to Brook road, another mile west on Brook road (another muddy, hilly gravel road. Cord drive was too muddy for a pickup, so Brett held up there to unload the hay for tractor to pick up and continue another mile to take out hay. It was during that down time, the hens apparently decided they’d had enough travel and hopped down to make themselves known. Dallas caught them and they scored an up front ride home. Never a lack of entertainment on the farm.

How did they go unnoticed for 22 miles?  The only answer must be that they were settled on top the spare tire which is bolted underneath the bed of the pickup.

Cheers!

tauna

The route of the chooks!

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Road Trip

“Unsuccessful people make decisions based on current situations.   Successful people make decisions based on where they want to be.”   ~ Benjamin Hardy

This kind of goes along with ‘don’t go to the grocery store when you are hungry’.

The weather has been so dismally cold, windy, frozen, snowy, icy, miserable here in north Missouri, i decided to head south a bit to seek sun and warmer temps under the guise of looking for new land for me cows.  Sadly, i seemed to drag the cold weather around with me, although one day was warm enough for 3 hours of saddle time on a good mount with great friends.  A little hiking and exploring, but by and large it was too cold.  One cold afternoon in Eureka Springs, i managed 2 miles in this cute, but busy town, followed by expert mani/pedi before heading north to Ozark, MO.

Although, paradise wasn’t found anywhere on my 2 1/2 week sojourn, my time was better spent visiting and catching up with friends and family.  It was a wonderful time to observe, think, share, reflect, and be lifted in spirit.

Cheers!

tauna

Climate Change and Cows

Great article!

Iowa Agriculture Literacy

By now you’ve probably heard rumors about cow farts containing greenhouse gases or that reducing the meat in your diet will save the planet. But how true are the things you’re hearing? Today, I’d like to go through and fact check some rumors and claims to see where the truth is.

First of all, I’d like to establish what climate and climate change is. Climate is not weather. Weather is how cold or warm or rainy or sunny it is on one particular day. Climate is the pattern. It’s how consistently it is warm or cold or rainy or sunny during certain times of the year. We are experiencing climate change. Things like warmer Arctic temperatures delivering an Arctic blast as far south as the Midwest and more frequent severe storms during the summer months attest to this.

In agriculture, climate change is especially concerning, because agriculture…

View original post 1,164 more words

Feeding Hay to Improve Your Land-Part 2

This is part 2.  Click here to return to Part 1

Click here American GrazingLands Services LLC to contact Jim about setting up a personal management-intensive grazing program on your farm or ranch.

Feeding Hay to Improve Your Land – Part 2

By Jim Gerrish  /  March 4, 2019  /  1 Comment

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This is Part 2 in Jim’s series. If you missed Part 1, here you go!

When you feed hay for fertilizer, we often think of it as a way to reduce the need for purchased fertilizer, especially Nitrogen (N). Have you thought about how much N you may actually be applying when you feed hay?

It may be more than you think.

Let’s Look at How N Moves From Fed Hay Back to the Soil

The amount of nitrogen in hay is directly tied to the protein content of the hay. Protein on average contains 16% N. Grass hay may have less protein than the livestock being fed require while legume hay generally has much more protein than required.

If the hay is just what the animal needs in terms of protein content, then about half of the N will be excreted in the feces and half in the urine.

Livestock will generally excrete 85 to 95% of the N consumed.

Fecal N content changes very little as dietary protein level increases.

N is slowly released from manure piles as they decompose. feces breaks down relatively quickly in warm, wet environments and very slowly in cool, dry environments.

Almost all excess N ingested by the animal when protein content of the feed exceeds the animal’s requirement is returned to the soil via urine.

Urinary N is a highly soluble & readily available N fertilizer. When managing hay feeding for targeted N application rate, urinary N is where we focus our attention.

This table shows how much urinary N is returned to the soil depending on the protein content of the hay.

When you decide how many bales of hay you will be feeding on an acre of pasture, this table can help you decide.

If you set a target amount of N to apply, you can determine how many bales per acre it will take to accomplish that application rate. You can see the number of bales to feed per acre will vary greatly depending on the quality of the hay being fed.

Do you have a nutrient management plan or are you missing a great opportunity and wasting resources?

Coming next week – Jim provides some background to help you figure out a plan to manage the nutrients from your hay feeding. If you have questions for Jim, do share them in the comments below!

Feeding Hay to Improve Your Land-Part 1

As you may already know, Jim and Dawn Gerrish are two of the most notable and knowledgeable people when it comes to land and livestock management, including management-intensive grazing (MiG).  Jim has his own consulting business which can save you lots of money right from the start of your adventure in managed grazing.  Contact him through American GrazingLands Services, LLC.  Find him on Youtube videos and pick up one of his well written books, Management Intensive Grazing – The Grassroots of Grass Farming and Kick the Hay Habit – a Practical Guide to Year Round Grazing.

Feeding Hay to Improve Your Land – Part 1

By   /  February 25, 2019  /  3 Comments

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We think it is far more important to stop making hay on your land than it is to stop feeding hay on your land. Here are some things to think about.

What Made Sense in 1973 Doesn’t Make Sense Today

Making hay is a whole lot more expensive than it used to be. This table compares input costs for making hay in 1973 in contrast to 2013.

 

All of the input costs have increased at a much faster rate than the value of beef cattle, lamb, or milk. To be on par with costs experienced in 1973, fed cattle should have been $284/cwt, not the $148 they were.

Hay = Inexpensive Fertility

While making hay is expensive, in much of the US, hay can be bought for less than the cost of production. When you buy someone else’s hay and feed it on your property, you are buying their fertility at a highly discounted rate. In some years in some locations, you can buy beef cattle hay for less than the fertilizer value it contains.

This is a great opportunity for improving your land in a way that also benefits soil health.

Feeding Uniformly is the Key

The key to soil improvement is to get the hay fed uniformly over your pastures. This is how you can realize the greatest benefit from purchased hay as a planned fertility input.

Large round bales are still the norm in much of US cow country. Round bales can be unrolled with relatively low-cost equipment. Bales don’t unroll uniformly all the time, but the subsequent manure distribution is way better than feeding bales in ring feeders.

Big square bales can be flaked off easily in a systematic way to cover a specific area with each bale fed.

Bale processors are expensive pieces of equipment. If you are invested in something like this, make sure you are feeding all of your hay to optimize the distribution of manure across the pasture.

We need to be thinking about how much nitrogen and phosphorus is in each bale we are feeding so we can plan our daily feeding to apply appropriate levels of nutrients rather than feeding too little and not realizing the benefit we expected or feeding too much and overloading the soil and environment with excess N. We’ll look at that next week!

Stay tuned! Jim will be covering all the data and math in this series to help us figure out how to do the best we can at improving pastures with hay feeding. If you have questions for Jim, do share them in the comments section below!

Faith, Family, Farm

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