Pregnancy Check – 2018

Pregnancy check and calf vaccinations for fall 2018 are recorded history.  October 25, 2018 held on to become a pretty nice day.  Veterinarian was hour and half late, but with the changes i’d made in the corral which made it more user friendly, we still managed to finish before dark.  The changes shaved at least an hour off working time.

Results of preg check were far more favorable than i could have ever expected given the very hot, dry, droughty, short grass conditions.

135 cows and heifers were checked.

  • Open/Bred
  • 2/39 of the 2 year olds – 95% bred
  • 3/19 of the 3 years olds – 84% bred
  • 2/15 of the 4 year olds – 87% bred *
  • 0/1 of the 5 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/6 of the 6 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/20 of the 7 year olds – 100% bred
  • 1/21 of the 8 year olds – 95% bred
  • 2/8 of the 9 year olds – 75% bred
  • 0/1 of the 10 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/1 of the 11 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/1 of the 12 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/3 of the 13 year olds – 100% bred

Totals – 10/135  = 7.4% open or 92.8% bred

THRILLED with this result even had there not been a drought and i hadn’t changed the breeding season.

Since i was going to Kenya this summer and because i cannot be out past the 15th of August to move the bulls away from the cows (because of severe ragweed allergy), i changed the breeding season from 17 July to 7 July and lopped off 12 days on the end.  In other words, last year breeding season was 17 july – 20 September, but this year is 6 July – 19 August.  Breeding season went from 65 days to 45 days.

According to gestation tables, this puts the first calves arriving April 14th and the last ones on May 28.  I do not like to start calving so early, but since the Corriente cows give such rich milk and combine with heat, humidity, and toxic endophyte fescue of late spring, it was a disaster the two years i calved them out in the mid-May to end of June time frame. (30% calf death loss due to scours despite major treatment).  Add in my allergies, i made the decision for my present season.  We can get some super nasty weather, however, in April, so time will tell.

Measuring for improvement

Cheers

tauna

*(these two young cows raised the biggest calves – not sustainable for my operation)

 

 

 

Beef Enchiladas – Recipe

Recipe – Beef Enchiladas

Beef Enchiladas

INGREDIENTS

  • 6 flour tortillas (whole wheat is best)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 small onion finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 pounds grass-finished ground beef
  • 2 cups shredded mozzarella or Monterey Jack cheese
  • 3/4 cup dairy sour cream
  • 3 tablespoons snipped dried parsley
  • 24 ounces tomato sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/3 cup sliced pitted ripe olives (optional)

 

DIRECTIONS
Heat oven to 350 degrees and spray a 9×13 inch pan with olive oil.  Soften chopped onions in olive oil, then add ground beef and brown ground beef.  Drain if necessary.  Return to pan and warm through, remove from heat.  Stir in 1 1/2 cups of the cheese, the sour cream, and parsley.  Cover and reserve.  Heat remaining ingredients except olives to boiling; reduce heat.  Simmer uncovered five minutes.  Whilst beef mixture simmers, prepare enchiladas by placing about 3/4 cup of meat/cheese mixture in each tortilla, roll and place in pan.  Pour tomato mixture over the top.  Sprinkle with remaining shredded cheese.  Bake for 25-27 minutes.  Serve with olives, sour cream, and additional salsa if desired.
Serves 6