Still Hoarding?!

As some items continue to be in short supply, both in stores and online, i’ve found myself enjoying the relatively easy challenge of replacing some of our favorites with home made, and therefore, healthier substitutes.

img_8568
Compare the ingredients on this delicious commercial (and convenient) product to those of my new homemade version.

My husband is a huge fan of Wish Bone Western Dressing. Apparently, a lot of people are. Incredibly, a quick google and i found the perfect recipe for us in the very first go! Never a reason to purchase the commercial product again.

Here’s my slightly modified recipe:

Homemade Western Dressing

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1/3 cup organic sugar
  • 1/3 cup organic olive oil, extra virgin
  • 2/3 cup organic ketchup
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • ½ tsp Bragg’s Liquid Aminos
  • ¼ tsp onion powder
  • ¼ tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp salt

DIRECTIONS:

Whisk together all ingredients until smooth.

Makes 12 ounces

Tips:

I mix in a 2 cup glass measuring container.  Gives me plenty of room to whisk, then I’m ready to pour it into a narrow necked dressing bottle. 

39c667f8-ee8e-4dfe-bd34-aac0f52ba4c3-5834-0000060049be7db9_file

Below is the published recipe. I made one change and that was to use Bragg’s Liquid Aminos instead of Worstershire Sauce. I may try to reduce the sugar, but may not – Allen thought it was perfect – i thought it a bit too sweet.

Homemade Western Dressing

A friend gave me this recipe. It is so much better than bottled dressing and there is no high fructose corn syrup if you use the organic ketchup (:Leah 15 mins  1 cooksnap

Ingredients

 16 servings

  1. 2/3 cup organic ketchup
  2. 1/3 cup olive oil, extra virgin
  3. 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  4. 1 tbsp honey
  5. 1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce (i used Bragg’s Liquid Aminos)
  6. 1/4 tsp onion powder
  7. 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  8. 1/4 tsp salt

Steps

  1. Whisk all the ingredients together until smooth. Refrigerate.

Published byLeahon June 11, 2015

 

Shabbat Shalom!

And whatever you may ask in My
name, this I will do, that the Father
may be glorified in the Son.
If you ask anything in My name, I
will do it. (Eph 5:20)
If you love Me, keep My
commandments, And I will petition the Father, and
He will give you another one which
will end the curse, that He may
remain with you forever, the Spirit of Truth, whom the
world cannot receive because it does
not see it nor know it. But you know it,
for it dwells with you and shall be in
you.

John 14:13-17 (Hebraic Roots Bible)

Mold & Mildew in my Cookbook!

Neglectfully, i sat my home made cookbook on my kitchen bench whilst cooking.  Apparently, it was quite wet and the pages soaked up a bunch of water, then i slapped it shut and took to the basement shelves until i needed it next.  The result was this horrible mess.  The mold is so bad, that i have to have the windows open just to read my recipes!

Moldy Cookbook
The mold and mildew have destroyed the recipe pages, binder, and dividers.

Today, i’m starting to run off new copies of each treasured recipe.  One of these days, i may do up a professionally looking family cookbook.

Printing new recipe pages
Thankfully, i’ve spend considerable time in the past putting together our family recipes and have them organized on my computer.

 

Land Considerations

As i get older, i’m more aware of how much time and hard work a piece of property can be.  Many years ago, my grandpa gave me a 160 acre piece of his land and i now realize that he was about my age now when he gave it.  I was much younger and was thrilled, but now i can see that he was probably tired of managing and fixing all its problems.  In fact, it is only about the east 80 acres of the farm i now have that incurs 80% of the work i do on the 520 acres i now own/manage.  (it is a sad reflection of our time that in north Missouri that is no where near enough property to make a living on).  At the same time, it’s the corner of that piece that is the best for working and loading out livestock.  (interestingly, my daughter, at about age 11 made the comment, ‘i don’t like this farm, it is too much work!”)

Truth be told, if it was possible for me to control the land to the north of me and to the south, i could all but eliminate the massive erosion and washing problems which cause my little piece to be so much work.  But i don’t, so difficult repairs are recurring.  Controlling the ‘heads’ of the water by building ponds or dams would practically stop all but the worst rain events which cause such destruction.  The biggest help would be to seed down the hills that are being farmed every year.  There are no roots to hold any soil in place and increase water infiltration on acres and acres of slope.

So, a point i’m trying to make is – look to your future self when purchasing a property – is this property you are considering fixable?  or will it be constant work?  We actually looked at a property last year that was adjoining and for sale, but with all it’s deep ditches and no control of the head, it would be more work than what we wanted to take on now at retirement age.  It is FAR too much asking price anyway.  (It’s still for sale)

img_8526
The water rushes through this gap so high and fast that there is brush and sometimes huge logs on top of the sealed road you see in this photo.  This time, there are only a few small pieces on the road, my fence caught most of the trash.  The fence is laid over so much, that i’ll actually take the wires off the two posts you see, pull the posts and reset them on the inside of the trash and it will still be in line with the existing fence.

img_8542
using my post puller  (from Hometown Hardware, Brookfield, MO) at a funny angle, but it worked!  i put a small log underneath the ‘foot’ of the contraption so it wouldn’t sink into the mud when i put pressure on the handle.

img_8541
All set to cut this piece of tin off because it’s so buried in the sand and mud, i couldn’t pull it out.  Took the photo, picked up the DeWalt reciprocating saw, clicked it off safety, and pulled the trigger.  Nothing, no power, what?!  Well, clearly you can see what i couldn’t – i forgot to bring a battery with me.  So, i will do this part of the repair on Friday when i come back to my farm.  UGGGHH!

img_8543
This one was a bit of a pickle, but after scratching my head a bit, i figured out a plan.  thank goodness i got a ‘B’ in geometry.  Farming and ranching is a LOT of problem solving with the tools you have on hand and putting them in the right order and angle.

Screenshot (1)
For fun, i found this map which shows the watershed area through which this one watergap i’m repairing all the runoff water passes through.  I measured the area and it encompasses 560 acres of surface land area.  When we get gully washers, which do come at least 3 times a year, that’s a lot of water rushing down Lick Branch – no wonder my fence gets washed out every time.

Replacing Solar Panel Fuse

My fences are completely dead now with the lack of a tiny fuse.  These photos are from the last time it needed changing.  I’m going to ask the fellow who installed this if we can turn that panel upside down so that the fuse box is lower to the ground.  This is just ridiculous how much work it is and equipment needed to change a fuse!

 

Solar Panel Wiring (2)Solar panel wiring (3)Solar panel wiring

Never Fail Challah

Even i can succeed at this Shabbat Challah!

Here are my efforts:

Shabbat Challah
Shabbat Challah before cooking and with glaze.
Shabbat Challah after cooking
Shabbat Challah after cooking – ready to enjoy immediately or freeze for later.

 

The Kosher Blogger

I always used to insist that there’s no reason to make your own challah in Israel when there are so many delicious challahs available to buy. My mind was quickly changed when a good friend who I had invited to Shabbat dinner, delivered two fresh out of the oven challahs to my house one Friday afternoon. They were melt in the mouth, sweet, soft and everything you’d want out of a home-baked challah. She happily gave me the recipe and every since I make them as often as I can. There’s is no bought substitute anywhere. I get dirty looks from my family when Shabbat dinner comes around and I haven’t baked them.

What I love about this recipe is that the proofing is very forgiving – I have left the dough to rise for an hour or so longer than the recipe requires, and all was well with the…

View original post 557 more words