Cow Days per Acre

Although, i’m still tracking grazing on my grazing chart, Jaime says i won’t need to under the total grazing. i bet i do, though, at least for a while.

For fun, i wanted to check the cow days per acre grazing with the total grazing situation on a tiny portion of my farm. This small section is 3.6 acres and there are 75 animal units grazing. It had last been grazed for 2 days (on a much larger scale since this small section is part of a 30 acre paddock) from 6 sep to 8 sep then allowed to grow whatever until the 18th of december when i turned the cows in on it. It didn’t grow much because it has been pretty dry since mid-August.

In 9 days it is completely consumed but not grubbed and the stock is in excellent condition despite temps dropping to single digits (F) the last 2 nights of the grazing period. This photo would reflect (imho) about a 90% utilization reflecting a surprising estimated 5500 lbs per acre yield. Had the cows been given full access to 3.6 acres at once, there would be no way of attaining 90% utilization due to fouling, manuring, and urinating. It was very thin up close, but from halfway to the far end is a natural spring area so it grows a LOT of forage since it stays kind of wet nearly all year.

Centered in this image is outlined in narrow red line a box which is the 3.6 acres the cows grazed for 9 days under total grazing method resulting in 188 cows days per acre. The cows do have full access to a 20% protein tub and salt/kelp.

Paddock Lessons so far

  1. plan paddock design with straight lines and 660 feet or less to strip graze. In a perfect world this could happen, in reality, there are draws, copses, deep ditches, travel situations which the livestock will simply never figure out, washouts, timbers, etc, etc, ad nauseum. But shoot for that layout as much as possible. Whether you aspire to total grazing, MiG (management-intensive grazing), adaptive grazing, mob grazing, the rectangular paddock with water source less than 800 feet (Paul Peterson was a lead in this study funded through SARE back in 1994) is about as an ideal for a scheme that requires much flexibility in fencing, grazing, and producer mindset.
  2. But remember to balance cost and time with grazing efficiency. In other words, if the paddock is most effective with a good water source 1000 feet, then that may be the best strategy.
  3. With paddocks designed utilizing 1.22 inch fiberglass posts about 50 feet apart (more closely spaced posts of course depending on terrain – north Missouri with undulating land, deep ditches, and timbers will frequently require closer placement than that). Using 1.22 inch posts provides a firm post for hooking onto for strip grazing at both ends.

As i prepare for the future in following guidelines for total grazing, i’m grazing this area intensively with temporary fencing for now. However, i do not plan to have to do this in the future. Far too much work and i’m allergic to work.

Here’s my on-the-fly fix for a temporary end post. Most of the time, these 1.22 inch fiberglass posts can be pulled up by hand. Note my makeshift hook (adulterated cotter pin) for the reel.
After the fiberglass is pulled up by hand, then it needs redriving in the next location along with the leap frogged polybraid and reel. Yes, i paint my driver orange so we can find them and not leave them planted all over the farm. Thankfully, the driver slid right over my makeshift hook so i didn’t have to remove and replace it. Snow was starting to come down and i was getting cold.
Better manure distribution with total grazing or some other managed program.
Cattle are restless today with snow and ice coming in. Thankfully not going to get super cold, but the wind is sharp. They have a nice timber to get in out of the wind if needed. If that break for grazing looks like a lot of area, you are right, there really isn’t much volume but yet it still needs cleaning up. Also, we are now getting ice on top of snow (3 hours after this photo was taken) so i’m giving them enough to get by in case i can’t get to my farm due to slick roads tomorrow.
Where are the now? they are on the north side of the orangish line. the orange line from extending from the timber to perimeter fence is a polybraid temporary set up only for this grazing set up . The cows are being moved to the south in a fencing leap frog scenario.

Frosty Chooks

The frost settled in heavy a few mornings back though thankfully warmed up nicely in the afternoon. My young Welsummer pullets (and five roosters) seemed to be in awe or shock at their surroundings. Or maybe they are just frozen! Naw, it wasn’t really that cold.

Having the chickens stay in the garden for the winter is a win-win-win. They have lots to scratch in, i can throw all kitchen scraps out there and they bury it or eat it, plus they poop a lot adding tons of manure nutrients to the soil. However, to prepare the ground for winter grazing, about mid-summer i allow grasses to grow unencumbered so they are mature and lay over by the end of the growing season.

Permanent Ley Update

So very odd that i’ve completely forgotten to finish this summary of my expensive permanent ley scheme which was completed the fall of 2017! So quick answer is that three years hence, there is a beautiful and diverse stand of valuable desirable mix of grass and legume species. Much of the original plants seeded are returning each year. I’ve been careful to allow them to mature and go to seed each year since to add to the seed bank. However, i still have not gained in cow days per acre in comparison to what i had before though the species are higher quality and likely allow better gains and performance in the cattle. Overall, i won’t do it again. I don’t like tillage and now that i’ve started total grazing, i’m hopeful i can improve forage while making money instead of spending money.

Update on that permanent ley seeding initiated last summer (2017).  We are still quite dry and with an unusual fall and lengthy, cold, harsh winter followed by a record setting cold April followed by a record warm May, grasses here in north Missouri are really confused and not producing.  The deal is that cool season grasses which show their greatest growth in spring had no chance this year.  April kept the soil temperatures far too cold for growth, then May spiked the heat, so grasses stopped growing!  Many grasses normally 2-3 feet tall were heading out and setting seed at only 6-8 inches!!  Another challenging year in agriculture.

The result of the shortage is that a lot of cattle have gone to market.  We have already sold ALL of our yearling calf crop born last year because of the shortage.  Plus, as part of a managed drought plan, we’ve also sold a good number of cows that we wouldn’t normally have done.  North Missouri was already short on livestock (due to the spike in crop prices a few years back, many pastures were plowed up and farmed), and now it is significantly more depleted.

 

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This beautiful burnett plant is such a valuable plant and three years later, it still comes on strong each spring.  Always excited to see it!

Three years after renovating this paddock, there is still a lovely mixture of red clover, lespedeza, birdsfoot trefoil, timothy, meadow fescue, chicory, and others!

Delar Burnet is an awesome grass – excited to see it staying established.

Traditional English Toffee

This is so easy and so delicious, i may founder on it! Show some restraint!

TRADITIONAL ENGLISH TOFFEE

Ingredients:

1 cup pecans, chopped

¾ cup brown sugar, packed

½ cup butter

½ cup semisweet chocolate chips

Directions:

Butter a small baking sheet.  Spread pecans in a single layer.  Heat butter and brown sugar to boiling in a heavy saucepan, stirring constantly for 7 minutes (note – you MUST stir quickly and constantly or it will easily burn and don’t shorten the amount of boiling time).  Immediately spread mixture over pecans on baking sheet.  It cools quickly, so get is spread – you might have time to help it cover, but use the back of spoon – it’s too hot to handle.  Sprinkle chocolate chips over hot mixture and quickly cover with a plate or tin foil.  Let melt, then using that spoon, spread melted chips in an even layer.  Refrigerate until firm.  Break toffee into pieces.

Tip – clean up your pot as soon as possible or the toffee really sticks.

So cold outside right now, i just set outside to cool vs refrigerating. It’s amazing how hot the stone pan got with the toffee so i set it up on a baking rack.

Pops out easily and breaks nicely into pieces. Ready to eat!

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Experience the Holidays: Traditional English Toffee! So often we have those cherished childhood memories of homemade candy and cookies that accompanied holiday celebrations. They stick with us for life. I can remember being in eighth grade and determined to replicate a batch of my mother’s English Toffee. I waited for her to go into town and then pulled out her secret recipe. You know, the ones scratched on a 3.5”x5” card. More often than not, they showed a list of ingredients with instructions that simply said, “Bake at 350° for 30 minutes”. Let’s face it, that’s pretty vague compared to what we explain nowadays. As you can imagine, I melted the butter along with the brown sugar and stirred. And stirred. And stirred. So how come it wasn’t turning into this crisp crunchy texture of rich golden butter that fueled my addiction? What could I possibly be doing wrong? There…

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Is Christmas Biblical?

Great teaching by Steve of Torah Family.

Steve says, “On multiple occasions, we’ve been asked why we don’t celebrate Christmas even though we believe in Jesus, Yeshua. So to help clarify the subject, here’s a teaching that gives the foundation to our understanding. Though this can be a sensitive topic for many, we believe you’ll find the research and studies within to be truly eye-opening.”

Why We Don’t Celebrate Christmas

Shabbat Shalom!

tauuna