All posts by tannachtonfarm

A 13- year homeschooling mom (youngest graduated in May 2015!) who is also a cattle and sheep farmer married to a cattle farmer. My three children and I enjoy traveling and spending time with family and friends. While this blog will chronicle our journey of Faith, Family, and Farm, opinionated articles on frugal living, traveling, recipes, and homeschooling experiences may be found sprinkled throughout!

For the LOVE of Horses

Since i was not much more than a toddler, i’ve loved horses, loved riding them, showing them in local shows, mustering in cattle (that’s my favorite), training, and trail riding. In junior high and high school, i was so crazy about horses that my nickname was ‘horsey’!

This neat article is published in the most recent issue of Rural Missouri. I studied this guy because he is from my home town, Mexico, Missouri.

For the Love of Horses

The extraordinary life of rider and trainer Tom Bass

Rural Missouri Page 40

Rural Missouri Page 42

The Furrow – Year 1916

No worries, i’ve done the due diligence and checked with John Deere to get permission to reprint articles from this fabulous magazine which is still coming to our home four times a year. Fortunately, i received the very friendly return e-mail:

East Anne <EastAnneK@johndeere.com 3 August 2020 8:24 am

Hi Tauna,

Thanks for reaching out.  I did some research and as it turns out, anything pre-1925 is in the public domain.  While it might be on you to reach out to anyone mentioned or authored (who would be deceased by now), you don’t need our permission.

I also live in Missouri and the weather today is FABULOUS!  Happy blogging.

Anne East
Content Marketing Manager
Agriculture & Turf, Region 4
Olathe, KS
Phone: 913.310.8293

Here is the old magazine in its entirety! Enjoy.

Family Farmers

Thanks to the Missouri Rural Crisis Center for bringing this informative article to light.

View this email in your browser
MRCC member Jeff Jones co-wrote this opinion that appeared in the High Plains Journal with our allies within the Campaign for Family Farms & the Environment (CFFE).

Our members, independent family farmers and rural communities, are suffering and are demanding policies that will help.

This current and historical pain is due to “government of the corporations, by the corporations, for the corporations”.

And, it doesn’t have to be this way.

Join MRCC and the fight for “government of the people, by the people, for the people”.

Thank you Jeff, for joining with other farmers in Iowa, Minnesota and South Dakota and daring to speak truth to corporate power

 *CFFE is comprised of Missouri Rural Crisis Center, Land Stewardship Project (MN), Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement. Dakota Rural Action (SD), Food and Water Watch and Institute for Ag and Trade Policy. Meatpacking corporations cash in on pandemic while family farms and consumers foot the billAug 21, 2020For most Americans, the fallout from the pandemic offered a crash course in how supply chains work (or rather, don’t work), especially in the meat supply. Suddenly grocery stores were rationing how much pork and beef each person could purchase, and consumers could no longer depend on getting the meat they needed at their local store. While the general public may have been shocked to see how quickly the meat supply grinded to a halt, farmers and ranchers, like us, were not.Just a handful of multinational companies, including Smithfield (China), Tyson (U.S.) and JBS (Brazil), control a critical step in the supply chain for pork and beef slaughter and processing. This industrial system hinges on a small number of massive slaughterhouses and processing plants, and these facilities are uniquely vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19.  With hundreds of workers standing shoulder to shoulder during a grueling and frenzied eight-hour shift, it is nearly impossible to practice protective measures like social distancing, which is why more than 17,300 meat and poultry processing workers in 29 states were infected with COVID-19 in April and May alone.Through it all, the big meat companies used threats of empty store shelves to resist calls to protect their workers by slowing down processing lines or temporarily closing plants. While the news media showed pictures of empty meat cases in grocery stores, meat supplies were being exported from the U.S. to other countries and a historic amount of meat sat in cold storage. This is the result of years of overproduction, which the meatpackers intentionally fuel to drive down prices paid to family farmers.Big meat companies increased their profits during this unprecedented crisis, even as independent family farm livestock producers were paid less, workers were put at greater risk, and consumers paid more for food staples. In one recent example, the June price for a steer going to market from the feedlot was more than $200 lower than it has been for the last several years. Yet, the price of beef at grocery stores just saw the largest monthly increase ever recorded.Things are so bad for livestock producers that several members of Congress and state attorneys general have called for investigations by the Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice. If done in good faith, these long-overdue investigations will confirm what farmers and ranchers like us have known for a long time: These companies rig the system to both increase their profits and deepen their control of livestock markets.But we need more than investigations. Our elected officials can act today to take on these global meat corporations and support workers and family farmers during this challenging time by making sure pandemic response assistance goes to independent family farmers who need it to survive, not multinational corporations making a racket. We also must protect workers by establishing enforceable workplace safety and health standards, preventing retaliation for reporting infection control problems or taking sick leave, and requiring tracking and public reporting of COVID-19 outbreaks in workplaces.To help family farms, lawmakers should set rules that allow independent livestock producers and small and mid-sized packing plants to compete on a level playing field by finalizing the USDA Farmer Fair Practice Rules. We also need to establish a moratorium on new agribusiness and food industry mergers to stop excessive corporate control from getting even worse and reinstate mandatory Country of Origin Labeling so U.S. consumers have the option to choose U.S. born, raised and processed meat.Lastly, we need to stop public taxpayer funding of corporate factory farms that fuel the corporate takeover of the meat system. With livestock backing up on farms because of supply chain disruption, this is no time to build more large-scale factory farms. Factory farms flood the market, push prices down and independent family farmers out, and exist to feed these giant corporate slaughterhouses.One of the many lessons we have learned from this global pandemic is that it matters who controls our food system. Right now, it’s a few multinational conglomerates that write the rules and extract every cent of wealth they can from family farmers, workers and consumers. Instead, we need a democratic, decentralized industry that benefits and lifts-up independent family farmers, consumers, our national and food security, and environment.The multinational meat companies who created this mess must not be the ones who decide what happens next for our food supply. It’s got to be all of us.*Barb Kalbach, fourth generation family farmer and Iowa CCI member from Adair County, Iowa; Jefferson Jones, fourth generation cattle, grain and hay farmer, Missouri Rural Crisis Center member, Callaway County, Missouri; John Harter, livestock producer, Dakota DRA chairperson, Winner, South Dakota; Darrel Mosel, cattle, soybean and corn farmer, Land Stewardship Project member, Gaylord, Minnesota.Join MRCC HERE
Copyright © 2020 Missouri Rural Crisis Center, All rights reserved.
You are receiving email from MRCC because you believe in independent family farms, sustainable rural economies and democracy.

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Texas Sheet Cake by June

TODAY is June’s 101st birthday! Yup, i made this recipe for cake and we’ll take it to her and celebrate by visiting, unfortunately through the glass wall at the nursing home. 😦

i didn’t have enough butter to make icing and didn’t have powdered sugar, so had to improvise using what i had and substituted with my home made vanilla yoghurt and castor sugar. hoping it turns out okay.

Tannachton Farm

Nearly every birthday my children had, especially as they grew older, they would request that their Great Aunt June Lamme would make them a chocolate Texas Sheet Cake.  Yummy!  I made it for the boys’ October birthdays this year (2019) for a small gathering at our traditional weiner roast birthday celebration.

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Grandma’s Texas Sheet Cake

  • 2 sticks (1 cup) butter
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 cup cocoa
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking soda (bicarb of soda)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk*
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

DIRECTIONS:

Bring to boil: butter, water, and cocoa.  Sift flour, sugar, soda, salt into a mixing bowl.  Pour in boiled mixture and mix.  Then add eggs, buttermilk, and vanilla.  Pour batter into a buttered 15″ x 12″ pan.  Bake in a preheated 350°F oven for 18-20 minutes.

*i rarely have buttermilk on hand, add 1 teaspoon lemon juice to…

View original post 145 more words

What IS A TRUE CHRISTIAN?

Zachary Bauer who founded New 2 Torah ministry published this video a couple days ago entitled There Is No True Definition of A Christian Anymore. You may not agree with Zachary on all points and you may not like his delivery, but he will likely make you think about all you that you believe.

Shabbat Shalom!

Zachary Bauer 68.6K subscribers Claiming to be a christian can no longer be defined by a set of beliefs. Not only do Christians keep unbiblical pagan rooted holidays such as Christmas and Easter, but they can’t even agree if homosexuality and abortion are sins anymore. #InCovenant#hebrewRoots#IamAHebrew

Peanut Butter

Today, in my miserable state of drugginess, coughing, swollen red itchy eyes, hair hurts, joints hurt, crankiness, can’t sleep, can’t stay awake, stuck inside, except to do a few short chores then come back inside to recover from ragweed allergies, i spent some time trying to find some peanut butter that is made in the USA from peanuts grown and roasted in the USA. I’ve never seen any in the grocery stores, but thought surely there is something out there. Come to find out – not much!

I’ve ordered from Georgia Grinders today and plan to call another producer, Snider Farms Peanut Barn in Hillis, Oklahoma on Monday since i can’t figure out their online ordering situation.

Read the ingredients on peanut butter – you will often be surprised by what is included! I want only peanut butter or peanut butter with a pinch of salt. No corn syrup, no palm oil, no sugar, nothing but peanuts. And now, i’m really cranking down to insist that the peanuts are sourced in the United States and the butter is produced at a small family business.

What kind of peanut butter do you buy? if any. How did you choose the brand you’ve selected?

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna

Gorgeous photo by Harvard Medical School