All posts by tannachtonfarm

A 13- year homeschooling mom (youngest graduated in May 2015!) who is also a cattle and sheep farmer married to a cattle farmer. My three children and I enjoy traveling and spending time with family and friends. While this blog will chronicle our journey of Faith, Family, and Farm, opinionated articles on frugal living, traveling, recipes, and homeschooling experiences may be found sprinkled throughout!

Mashed “Potatoes”

As I wind up the last day of my Wheat Belly 10-day detox, I’ll share another basic yet tasty recipe from Dr William Davis.

Mashed “Potatoes”     (makes 4 servings)

  1. 1 large head cauliflower
  2. 1/4 cup canned coconut milk (i use raw milk from grassfed cows)
  3. 2 tablespoons butter (from the same cows, but you could replace this with olive oil)
  4. 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  5. Ground black pepper to taste

Place a steamer basket in a large pot with 2″ of water.  Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium. Place the cauliflower in the basket, cover, and steam for 15 to 20 minutes, or until tender.

Remove from heat and drain.  In a blender, food processor, or food chopper, combine the cauliflower, milk, butter, salt, and pepper.  Blend or process until smooth

Per serving:  131 calories, 4 g protein, 11 g carbohydrates, 9 g total fat, 6 g saturated fat, 4 g fiber, 214 mg sodium.

Dr Davis provides these additional notes regarding this recipe:

Although not a grain, potatoes yield too many carbohydrates when cooked.  This is a problem in your 10-Day Detox because excessive carbohydrates turn off your capacity to lose weight by triggering blood sugar and insulin to high levels.  Rather than simply subtracting another common staple from your dinner table, here is a way to not just replace mashed potatoes, but to create something that tastes even better, but with none of the problems.  Replace butter with extra-virgin olive oil for a dairy-free version.

Here’s to feeling great!

tauna

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Wash a head of cauliflower.
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With a sharp knife, cut away the stem and leaves of the cauliflower head.
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Don’t throw away those leaves and stem!  Save them all for later chopping for soup, casserole, lumpia.  The leaves have a tangy, crisp taste.
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The recipe calls for separating into florets, but i really didn’t find that necessary.
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Place the steamer basket and cauliflower in pot for steaming.
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Cover and steam 15-20 minutes.  Oh good grief, i got myself in the lid.
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For my family, I cut the head in half because we just don’t need so much.  One half, i will save for later to serve with melted sharper cheddar over top.
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After the cauliflower has cooled slightly, I process the cauliflower in my ancient food processor and add the remaining ingredients.
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Mashed “potatoes”
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Served with fresh green salad mix and a grilled grassfed ground beef burger from our own herd. (this one is actually from that bull!)  And a small piece of Wheat Belly Herbed Focaccia bread.
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A couple days later, I was going to make soup, so i whirred up those leaves and stems.

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The Fall of Thor’s Hammer

Book Review

Follow along with Levi Prince and gang in this Book 2 on their fantastical adventures at camp.  This series is geared towards young adults, but i had a blast reading along.  Easy read, fast-paced, excellent story line, and message.  Print and kindle copies available at several venues.  Click through on Goodreads.

Other great young adults books by Amy C Blake:

The Trojan Horse Traitor (Levi Prince) Paperback – November 17, 2015

Whitewashed: On the Brink Series Book 1 Paperback – February 7, 2015

Colorblind: On The Brink Series, Book 2 Paperback – February 7, 2016

Looking for gift ideas?  Don’t even forget about books – and these are highly recommended.

Cheers

tauna

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The Fall of Thor’s Hammer – Amy C. Blake

Wheat Belly Pizza

My version:

2 1/2 cup almond meal/flour

 

1/4 cup ground flaxseeds

1 teaspoon onion or garlic powder

2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese – divided

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

2 large farm eggs

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup water (may not need this much)

8-10 ounces of grass finished ground beef or lamb or home made beef or lamb sausage

1 cup pizza sauce

Optional ingredients i usually add:  sliced black olives and sliced fresh mushrooms, extra cheese

Preheat the oven to 350°F .

Use a Ninja Blender (mine is called a Fit Blender i believe) or some other type.

In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, pumpkin, sesame flour, ground flax seed, 1 cup of the mozzarella cheese, onion powder, and sea salt.  Mix well.  Then i add the two large eggs, 1/4 cup olive oil, and the water.  Mix and combine thoroughly.

Butter a 10″ x 15″ pan (i use a stone jelly roll pan).  Place the dough on the pan, then spread the dough by hand.  You may have to keep your fingers wet using olive oil or water to keep it from sticking to your hands.

Bake for 20 minutes.

When you are ready, spread the pizza sauce, i sprinkle some Parmesan cheese if i have any, but usually i don’t, so i use some shredded raw cheddar or whatever i have on hand.  Then crumble the cooked meat on top of that followed by optional olives and/or fresh mushrooms.  Top with remaining mozzarella or other cheese.  Bake for another 12 minutes.

Cut into about 12 pieces; this is very filling.  One piece may fill you right up!

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Wheat Belly 10 day detox book

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Apricot Ginger “Granola” by Wheat Belly

I’m no good at sticking with the Wheat Belly diet with the exception of keeping grain out of my diet, and by default, milk, simply because even grass based, organic, real milk doesn’t agree with me and i’m not going to buy almond or coconut milk.  But i do keep this ‘granola’ made up and stored in a Ziploc Bag in the freezer – just dipping out about 1/4 cup for brecky most mornings and usually eat without milk, but sometimes 1/2 sliced organic banana.  Most of my organic nuts and seeds come from Food To Live which can be ordered directly from their website or some are available through Wal-Mart online ordering.

My version of Wheat Belly‘s Apricot Ginger “Granola”

5 dried or apricots or more likely i use prunes

1/4 cup coconut oil, melted

2 teaspoons vanilla (Mexican pure)

2 cups raw sunflower seeds

2 cups raw pumpkin seeds

1 cup chopped raw pecans

1 cup chopped raw almonds (these aren’t available in the US; mine come from Italy)

2 cups unsweetened desiccated coconut

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground allspice

NO SWEETENER (it really doesn’t need it, but you can always drizzle a bit of pure local  honey on top, then eat with a spoon).

 

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Here’s the published recipe, but above in the body of this blog entry, i’ve published the way i actually make it.

Repairing/Rebuilding Trashed Feed Bunks

Doing MUCH better with ragweed allergies to the point that, as long as i stay far away from the plants themselves, i can spend considerable time outside without effects and even without taking meds.  Almost back to health.

So, during this transition, i’ve taken the task of dragging all our bits and pieces of feedbunks together and making a plan to repair and rebuild to the extent of my ability and with no other expense except labour and reasonable amount of time.

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This feedbunk frame will be attended to last – i think this chrysalis is still going, so i’ll wait until the monarch butterfly emerges.
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Drill hole through liner and into the metal frame, then screw in these screws to hold tub in bunk properly.
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After the tub is screwed into place, the bunk is turned over to reveal all the missing braces that will need replacing.
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I dragged an old mangled gate out of the trash pile to cut to length for the bunk braces.  This DeWalt sawzall (reciprocating saw) does the job in no time.
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After cutting a piece of the gate to 30 inches,  it is placed in the bench vise as shown.
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Then with some muscles, I crank down the vise to squish each end flat.
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After marking proper placement for the hole, i use the drill press to make it easier to drill a hole on each end.
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Then mark the spot on the feedbunk and drill a hole through the brace with my handheld cordless DeWalt drill.
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Line up my newly made brace with the existing brace on the bunk and run a bolt through. I’m not spending any money on this project, so using old bolts we already had.  However, i discovered the old bolts were fine thread, so i did have to purchase fine thread hex nuts at $.19/each from Orscheln’s.
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Ripping old board salvaged from another project into four strips to be used as replacement runners on feedbunks.

 

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Drilled then bolted runner to existing rotted metal runner.

 

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Project almost complete.
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Added chains on one end to make it easier to hook onto to move the bunk around.  Chains are leftovers from old and mangled gates.
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Finished!

Buying Hay

 

Finding NPK in forage via test results

Given the retail prices of N, P, and K – (Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium) from Butterfield Grain Associates in Meadville, MO.

Nitrogen – 3.71 lbs times .42/lb = $1.56

Phosphorus – 1.63 lbs times .35/lb = $0.57

Potassium – 8.875 lbs times .29/lb = $2.57

Total NPK value  = $4.70 per 1250 lb hay bale or $12.17 per ton.

This value doesn’t include micronutrients and the organic matter in manure and wasted hay, including calcium, magnesium, etc.

Purchased bales of mature warm season grasses weigh about 1250 lbs each.  I sent core samples to Ward Laboratories to have analysed for feed value as well as fertilizer value.  Here are the results:

Ward Labs - Libby hay Sep 2017