Category Archives: FAMILY

Stay At Home Order

Our little rural county had a case of coronavirus.  The patient is self quarantining at home and now Linn County, Missouri has a 14 page stay at home ruling.  Thankfully, despite its lengthy legal liturgy, the ruling isn’t too overbearing, though there is no end date and that is a concern.  Sad.

Being in agriculture, we are fortunate to not be affected much as far as to movement, though cattle markets indicate no profits this.  Hopefully, we’ll all be back in a profitable mode before too much longer.

Linn County Stay at Home Order

A Busy Day!

Typical farm day – nothing exciting – but each activity was successful and that makes for a rewarding, yet exhausting day.  I’ll be sore tomorrow, but Panadol and Pukka tea will help me relax for a good night’s sleep.  Rain forecasted for all day tomorrow, so inside work.

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Using a tractor, front end load, and bucket is not a handy way to accomplish this job, especially in tight quarters and having a bale unroller on the back end.

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Son, Dallas, expertly maneuvered the tractor to level previously hauled dirt in the corral, then we laid large sheets of geotextile fabric i had previously cut, then the 1 1/2 inch gravel was piled and leveled on top.  All this is in preparation for my new cattle working tub which we hope can be installed next week after these rains.

While he was finishing up (and i kept supervising), i had time to walk my weaned calves 1/2 mile from their 5 acre paddock to pasture.  Grass isn’t growing very fast yet, so i hauled two square bales of hay – one good brome and one alfalfa to supplement.  However, the calves are still very much more interested in grazing the bit of green.  It’s a bit of work to feed the square bales since they have to be pushed off a flake at a time.  Each bale weighs 700 lbs.

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Walked my weaned calves to pasture this morning a half mile. Nice and quiet even without a nanny cow. One escapee figured her back around and now she was hurrying to catch up.

Back home, i spent the remainder of the afternoon and evening shoveling soil in a wheelbarrow and moving it to some containers and low spots in my garden.  Then loaded about 30 4 ft old hedge posts onto the flatbed pickup to haul to a neighbour to use as firewood.

How was your day?!

Cheers

tauna

 

Pershing Parks

An afternoon walk with my dear friend – a wonderful day for fresh air, sunshine, and mild exercise.  Imperative for good health.  Despite the campgrounds and playground areas being closed, the trails are still open for good healthy outings (at least for now).

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Locust Creek Covered Bridge in Linn County, Missouri’s Covered Bridge State Historic Site – part of the Missouri State Park System
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Boardwalk trail through scenic prairie and riparian areas at Pershing State Park

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A bit of sustenance of Icelandic beef jerky from Rekjavik

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Foreign Land Ownership in Missouri

National and international agricultural businesses control the money, influence, and congressmen in Missouri which is detrimental to our local control efforts.  Our senators, representatives, and even the citizens of the state have been bought or buffaloed into believing falsehoods which has seriously harmed the livelihoods of farm families.

Without going into great detail, here is an article with a good overview.

US: Bill would halt foreign ownership of Missouri farmland

Columbia Missourian | 15 January 2020
Letter to the editor

Bill would halt foreign ownership of Missouri farmland

by DAN MURPHY
It’s in the best interest for Missouri farmers and consumers to fight against the corporatization of our food system. Missouri farmers have been under siege by the corporatization of food system led by out-of-state and foreign industrial agriculture companies.
In 2013, our state legislature opened up 289,000 acres of Missouri farmland for foreign corporate ownership. This major change was quietly added to a large omnibus bill at the end of the 2013 legislative session. Two weeks later, Smithfield Foods was purchased by a large Chinese meat packer (now known as WH Group) and instantly acquired over 42,000 acres of Missouri farmland.
A loophole was then added in 2015 that opened up Missouri to virtually unlimited foreign corporate ownership of Missouri farmland. This is unacceptable and must be stopped.
Rep. Doug Beck (D-St. Louis) has offered House Bill 1492, which would correct this and halt any future foreign corporate ownership of Missouri farmland. Our farmland is a finite and precious resource that should not be controlled by foreign corporate interests as this jeopardizes both our food security and national security.
I’m calling on Gov. Mike Parson, my state senator, Caleb Rowden, and our Columbia area state representatives to support this legislation that keeps our farmland available for domestic food production.
As a constituent, you can encourage your representative to vote for this bill. You can also become more involved in the choices you make by asking stores and restaurants where they get their meat and supporting groups such as the Missouri Rural Crisis Center and Patchwork Family Farms.
Original source: Missourian

Columbia Missourian | 15 January 2020

 

Free is Never Free

It has finally warmed up and i moved my laying hens out of their winter abode in the garden into their new safe haven of a fenced lot in the pasture.  I then move them about once a week, depending on forage availability during the growing season.  Now, warm weather, sunshine, lengthening daylight, and out on pasture make happy hens lay oodles of eggs.

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To keep these Welsummers safe, i must use an electrified netting or every critter in the country will kill them.  Even the hawks and eagles circle above, but chickens can be smart and they’ll spot an aerial predator immediately and take cover in their eggmobile.  
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Winter abode

When i posted these photos on Facebook, one fellow suggested, ‘ Eggs are hard to come by at some of the big city grocery stores these days… you might wanna put those up on Amazon (:’

Given the expense and logistics of shipping a very breakable commodity, it’s just not worth the cost, so i end up giving away extras to people who help me throughout the year and will never accept a payment.  Plus, nobody is going to pay what it actually costs to produce them.  Springtime provides a lot of eggs, but the supply will dwindle as the daylight hours are shortened and as hens get older.  Prime laying is only through their third year of life (max!)

Please know, however, that i don’t just give them away willy nilly (i do like to give them to people who do things for me but will never take payment) because it harms those who are trying to make a living at it. In a similar fashion, when US Aid sends tons of grain as a ‘help’ to other countries, it drives down the market price for the local farmers scratching out a living. Much the same happens here when our markets are opened to meat that is produced overseas for far less than what we can produce it here. Free stuff is never free.

Pig Science

Shabbat Shalom!

Check out this short, but informative video on eating pork.

test everything, hold onto what is good – 1 Thessalonians 5:21

Before science we had a Creator who told us what to eat and what not to. Today science is backing up His wisdom, such as when it comes to eating swine. This is a bit of pig science.

Source: Pig Science

https://www.119ministries.com/teachings/video-teachings/detail/pig-science/

Unclean pig image

 

Meatloaf Redux

When i went back to follow the recipe for the meatloaf recipe i had posted from Wall Street Journal, i realised it was totally messed up!  Oh, if you have cooked before you could figure it out, but, honestly, it is ridiculous.  So i did update it, but today, i’ve basically rewritten the recipe to make it easier and use ingredients I’m more likely to have on hand.  I’m just puttin’ it out there – this is the best meatloaf i’ve ever made!

Whisky Meatloaf 

Tannachton Farm

Preheat over to 400°F.

  • 1 cup chopped onion or 3 tablespoons flaked dried onions
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 cloves garlic or 1/2 teaspoon dried garlic

Over low to medium heat in a skillet melt butter and soften the onion and garlic, then lower heat and add:

  • 1 cup fresh spinach snipped into small pieces or (1/4 cup chopped cauliflower leaves, celery, etc)
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mushrooms or small can of mushrooms

Sauté until just softened.

In a separate bowl mix together

  • 1 lb grass finished ground beef
  • 1/2 cup finely ground bread crumbs (use leftovers from a failed baking experiment)
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons brandy (brandy and whisky work fine)

Add the vegetables to beef mixture, then mix very well.  Form into a log 2 1/2 inch diameter.  Place in the center of a preheated oven for 6 minutes.

While this is cooking, prepare the glaze.

Whisk together in a small bowl:

After meatloaf has baked about 6 minutes, remove it from the oven and brush glaze over top.

Return pan to oven and bake until meat is just cooked through, about 25 more minutes.   Remove  from over and let cool slightly.

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Meatloaf
Brush the glaze over the top and sides

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