Category Archives: Thoughts

Living the Dream

This was written by a friend from north Missouri in honor of her hard working husband (farmer and welder, Lone Oak Fabrication, LLC, Clarence, Missouri), though it is a testament to her hard work and sacrifice as well (i would consider Erin a modern day Proverbs 31 woman).  Sometimes we grumble about our employers and some may go on strike, but oftentimes, especially in small towns, with small start up businesses, the owners are paddling like crazy to keep the operation afloat.  If he or she has the opportunity to hire someone to come along, that is a bonus for everyone.  If you, as the employee, think you are mistreated or underpaid, then move on to your dream job with dream pay, don’t undermine the efforts of the small businessman by not giving your best each day.       (tauna’s comments)

 

  • This is what being self-employed looks like.It’s working 80 hours a week so you don’t have to work 40 hours for someone else.It’s getting up extra early to work before the rest of the day hits.

    It’s putting in a few more hours after you kiss your kids good night.

    It’s leaving the house before your spouse is awake and coming home after they are asleep. Sometimes only talking to each other via text for days at a time.

    It’s making sacrifices and pinching pennies.

    It’s throwing your whole heart into a dream, a vision, a goal for a better future.

    It’s the thrill of knowing you can manage your own time and the sickening feeling when you don’t manage it well.

    It’s making out invoices while your spouse addresses the envelopes because you’re working this dream together.

    It’s having the guts to take a risk and knowing if it doesn’t work out, you learn the lesson and try again.

    It’s all this and so much more. I’m so proud of you David.

Erin Spurgeon, wife, mother, educator, small business owner, Stitches & Staples

Katy Trail in Missouri

Just picked up our most recent copy of Missouri Life magazine (September 2019), and was amazed and thrilled that the landowner stories in regards to the Katy Trail were told and explained.  I know that articles written by people who were not intricately involved in the subject cannot convey the emotion and even facts sometimes of an issue, but this one, i suspect, comes close.  It is a long article, but one well worth reading.  This sort of land grab is not the first of its kind in US history.  In fact, this same issue has another story entitled: 210 Miles to Taum Sauk

The establishment of the Katy Trail through Missouri is a story of government land grab – not eminent domain – just a confiscation.  We have not been affected (yet) by the rail banking scheme, but it still makes me angry enough (on behalf of the landowners) that, even today, i have not visited any of the Katy Trail (at least i have not meant to).

One of Missouri’s little known treasures is the Missouri Life magazine.  Subscribe here.

Katy Trail Landowners:  Then and Now

When the Missouri River flooded in the spring of 1986, anyone standing in Maurice and Jayne Glosemeyer’s barn in rural Warren County would have been underwater. The damages to the the nearby Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad (MKT), which divided their house from their hog operation, were so severe that the company pulled up its tracks.

The railroad’s decline was no surprise to the Glosemeyers or their neighbors. For years, service had been slowing anyway. And the farmers, many of whose families had owned land in the region since the 1800s, had witnessed plenty of change come and go in the valley.

A century earlier, the railroad’s arrival brought the welcome promise of wealth and supply lines for area farmers. Train corridors across the country formed in a variety of ways—by direct purchase, federal land grants, or via easements from individual landowners. When the railroad began assembling its path across Missouri in the 1890s, it paid affected property owners for the easement access, but the land beneath was never owned by the railroad. The specific terms of the easement granted the corridor “for a railroad, and for no other purposes.”

couple standing on the katy trail
Jayne and Maurice Glosemeyer pose on the Katy Trail where it crosses their property in Warren County. Photo by Rose Hansen.

“We felt it was written in stone that once the railroad company abandoned that, it was ours,” says Jayne.

So it came as a surprise when a neighbor shared a newspaper clipping that detailed the state’s planned conversion of the railroad into a public hiking and biking trail.

The Glosemeyers were stunned. It couldn’t be true. Could the government really do such a thing—just seize land—without first notifying the property owners, or even paying for it?

“This wasn’t even an eminent domain thing,” Jayne recalls. “Eminent domain at least makes sure you get compensated. When something like a highway comes through, they have to purchase [the land]. They can’t ignore that you exist and steal your property.”

Unbeknownst to them, three years earlier Congress had passed rail-banking amendments under the National Trails Systems Act to “preserve established railroad corridors for interim trail and future trail use.” Trail activists across the nation began using this new legislation to create recreational paths.

“The sad thing with this whole affair was that the majority of the landowners along the Katy Trail, had they been approached and asked, ‘Will you sell us your property?’ they probably would have done so,” Jayne says. “But to be treated so that you have to read about it first in the sports section? That’s low.”

They weren’t alone in their anger. Armed with a 97-year-old railroad easement contract and the backing of the Missouri Farm Bureau, the Glosemeyers led the legal fight in a decade-long class action lawsuit asserting the violation of Fifth Amendment rights that affected more than 1,100 fellow property owners. They received hate mail and anonymous phone calls. Maurice woke up one morning to find the tires on his tractor slashed. Though the Supreme Court eventually upheld the government’s stance on railbanking, in 2000 the Court of Federal Claims acknowledged that the taking of property for public use without compensation was illegal. For the landowners, it was a win.

But the verdict was ten years too late. In 1990, a crowd of more than 1,000 people celebrated the official opening of the first segment of the Katy Trail. At 240-miles long, the Katy Trail is the longest rail-trail path in the nation and beloved by thousands, much to the credit of public relations efforts to brand the trail and the surrounding Missouri River Valley region. It’s a narrative of success that has energized a push for the Rock Island Trail (MORIT), which proposes to rail-bank 144 miles of the Ameren line, connecting St. Louis, Kansas City, and the Katy in a 450-mile loop.

Despite overwhelming support from the general public and rural business owners who stand to gain from the trail, MORIT faces resistance from some rural landowners similar to that of the Katy. There are questions about compensation, potential effects on agricultural operations, and the taxpayer cost of the trail. MORIT activists point to the success of the Katy to alleviate those concerns. But that’s only half the story.

“You hear proponents saying that the trail has not been as onerous to the property owners as they feared it would be. But they ignore the legal aspect. They just say, ‘There’s a federal law that allowed us to do it,’ ” says Estil Fretwell, a former state legislator who was also the Director of Public Affairs for the Missouri Farm Bureau. “Landowners were so frustrated and so upset that the proponents never acknowledged their legal arguments. It’s interesting. They’re still emotional about it.”

The Katy Trail has been around for more than 30 years. What lessons, if any, can be gleaned by revisiting the past?

“I still have feelings. We should’ve had a different outcome than what it was,” says Gary Heldt, a landowner who owns 62-acres of farmland along the Katy Trail outside of Rhineland.

Edward D. “Ted” Jones appeared on the capitol steps at a rally for the Katy Trail. Photo by Jim Denney.
Gary Heldt was the major organizer involved in rallying farmers to sign onto the Glosemeyer suit. Photo by Rose Hansen.

The stretch between Rhineland and Marthasville formed the hotbed of dissent against the recreation trail. The Glosemeyers were named in the lawsuit, but Heldt was the person responsible for organizing affected landowners to take action. When the MKT first abandoned the corridor, he was running the grain elevator in Rhineland, and the railroad was a vital part of the business.

“I had a lot of concerned customers,” he recalls. “It was just a simple easement granted for railroad purposes only. They felt the ground should revert back to them. It was a different use, turning the property from a railroad bed to a hiking and biking trail. We weren’t against hikers or bicycles or what have you. Our emphasis was the fact that the property was going to be utilized in a different manner than it was originally deeded. The details of the easement specifically stipulate that it could not be used for anything other than a railroad.”

Legally, the purpose of the rail-banking claim used to create the Katy Trail is to preserve corridors for the potential reactivation of a future transportation line. Theoretically, a high-speed train could someday reclaim the Katy for its own use. However, the reactivation of these corridors has rarely, if ever, occurred.

Two decades before Congress amended the National Trails System Act to employ rail-banking, rail-trail conversions were already happening. The first rail-trail opened was the Elroy-Sparta State Trail in 1967 in Wisconsin. More followed in Iowa, Illinois, and again in Wisconsin. But after Congress amended the National Trails System Act to employ rail-banking, Missouri became the first state to formally test the new law with the proposal for the Katy Trail, backed by a powerful Missourian named Edward “Ted” Jones. His father had started a brokerage firm in downtown St. Louis, but Ted preferred working in small towns, offering financial guidance to citizens across rural Missouri. He liked country life so much, in fact, that he bought a 711-acre farm in Callaway County. (His widow, Pat Jones, eventually donated the land to the state in 1997, forming the Prairie Fork Conservation Area.)

“Ted wanted to provide a way for other people, who weren’t as fortunate as he was to have his own farm, to experience rural Missouri,” says Dan Burkhardt, a retired partner of Edward Jones. In 2010, he and his wife Connie founded the Katy Trail Land Trust. “Fortunately, the Katy Railroad was abandoning its right of way. They were going out of business. Ted said, ‘I’m going to take their right-of-way and turn it into a biking trail.’ This was a very radical idea. It had never been done in Missouri, never to this extent.”

press conference in missouri over the katy trail
Edward D. “Ted” Jones appeared on the capitol steps at a rally for the Katy Trail. Photo by Jim Denney.

Jones donated $200,000 to the Conservation Federation of Missouri Charitable Trust, and the money was used to acquire the easements from the railroad company under the Trails System Act. Later, he donated another $2 million to aid with trail construction between Sedalia and Machens.

“It was for the greater good. This was a once in a lifetime opportunity to create something that was never possible to replicate again. He took all the negative feedback, paid for all this out of his own pocket,” says Burkhardt. “It was extremely difficult and complicated. Landowners whose properties the right-of-way passed through did not want it turned into a trail. They vigorously objected to it. Ultimately, our governor, John Ashcroft, sided with Ted.”

The number of rail-trails has grown dramatically since 1986. According to the Rails to Trails Conservancy, which includes more than 160,000 members and supporters, some 23,000 miles of abandoned railroad corridors have been converted into recreational trails across the United States.

In the year 2013 alone, the government paid $49 million in compensation claims to property owners affected by rail-trail conversions. Landowners, of course, see themselves as pragmatic underdogs outnumbered by distant, powerful interests.

“The publicity they generated, they tried to paint us in a situation like we were a bunch of redneck farmers out here who didn’t know what we were doing or how to manage our own property,” Heldt recalls.

“The Katy Trail landowners who stood up for their property rights are heroes,” says Fretwell. “This was obviously something that had popularity with the public. Why not build a trail? Why not let the public come along and use this property? And yet the Katy landowners were saying, ‘Yes, but this is my property. You’re taking my property.’ ”

The protests did little to sway trail proponents, a dynamic that still persists today. When the railroad first negotiated easements with Missouri River Valley farmers, one third of the nation’s population lived on farms. Today, less than one percent does. Empathizing with property owners is difficult if you don’t own land, if that land hasn’t been in your family for generations, if you aren’t rural, if you live in an apartment, in a city, far, far away.

By Jayne’s calculations, the amount of her property traversed by the Katy Trail totaled 12 acres. The estimate includes the trail and the right of way on both sides for a combined width of 100 feet. “A lot of the people who use this trail, they don’t even own an acre. But they were perfectly happy for me to lose 12 so they could have a place to ride their bicycle,” Jayne says.

Her protests continue to fall on deaf ears. A more apt comparison might be to consider how trail proponents might feel if they’d rented a room out in their own houses on a month-by-month basis only to be told by the government that the room would be used for another purpose, seized without payment, and never returned. Oh, and by the way, you still have to pay taxes on the seized property.

The proposed Rock Island Trail would connect to the Katy to form a 450-mile loop through Missouri. The route would showcase the best of Missouri’s natural landscapes—not just pristine prairie and picturesque farmland, but the wrinkled terrain of the Ozark Mountains, too. At one end is St Louis. And in the west, these trails would meet in Windsor, where one portion of the Rock Island Trail is already open. Lifetime resident Mike Mothersbaugh owns 18 acres along the Katy Trail, and lives less than a mile from its intersection with the Rock Island Trail. “The people on the Katy took the black eye. At the time the Katy Trail started to become the trail, I was an opinion writer in the local newspaper and also a landowner along the trail. The process and the public relations surrounding the whole startup left me raw. I disagreed with it greatly. And that really hasn’t changed,” he says. “What has changed for me is acceptance. It needs to be utilized because it’s here. It has become part of our character, part of [Windsor’s] local economy. It’s very evident that it is prospering, growing. If it grows, we do, too.” Mothersbaugh was never compensated for the state’s use of his land. He chose not to join the lawsuit, and only the people who did participate were eligible for the payout.

His is the kind of change-of-heart testimony, however mild, that trail proponents want to hear and use whenever possible. As Dan Burkhardt puts it, “The more we act like things are getting behind us regarding the hurt feelings of 30 years ago, the more they will get behind us.”

The Peers Store, alongside the Katy Trail in Marthasville, is owned by Katy Land Trust founder Dan Burkhardt. Photo by Rose Hansen.

From a public relations perspective, it’s much easier to focus a trail’s concrete effects on agricultural operations or property management issues, which were at the heart of the secondary opposition to the Katy and also to Rock Island.

“I’ll walk into meetings with 200 or more disgruntled landowners and then just raise my hand and say, ‘Of course there was this feeling, too, when the Katy came through Windsor,’ ” says Kim Henderson, owner of Kim’s Cabins in Windsor. “But I can tell you for a fact now that most people are not there to camp in your barn and burn it down or pick your morel mushrooms or bother your cattle. They’re here to spend their dollars. They’re coming from all over the country and the world, and that all goes back to our communities and the state.”

For trail proponents, this seems like the perfect response. And yet resistance to Rock Island persists. Its making would also require crossing more than 1,000 agricultural operations. Landowners along the Rock Island Trail cite many of the same concerns Katy Trail landowners cited—agricultural biohazards, increased traffic around sensitive and volatile farm chemicals, crime.

To nonfarmers, the solutions seem simple. Put up signs. Build a fence. Relocate, or better yet, change your farming operation. But those things aren’t free. Someone has to pay for them. Agricultural fencing alone can cost up to $10,000 a mile. Who would pay for its installation? For its maintenance? The farmer? The taxpayers?

To Burkhardt, the making of the Katy Trail was the result of perfect timing and perfect, powerful interests. The times have changed. In this political climate, the landowners might win. But this time around, they probably won’t have to take their case to the Supreme Court. The precedent for payment was set by the Glosemeyers 30 years ago.

“If someone owns the land under the railroad easement and a rail-trail comes along, the owners are entitled to federal compensation. That’s a Fifth Amendment entitlement. The government can’t just take your land without compensating you,” says Greg Harris, executive director of MORIT. But because this transaction is not eminent domain, the compensation is not automatic. Landowners must file a claim against the federal government, like the one spearheaded by Meghan Largent of Lewis Rice legal council in St. Louis, which represents MORIT-affected landowners, to receive fair market value compensation.

In the Glosemeyer case, the court ruled that “recreational hiking, jogging, and cycling are not connected with railroad use in any meaningful way,” and that, given that the easement of the Glosemeyer’s property was exclusively for railroad purposes, “When the railroads ceased operations, [the Glosemeyers] would own the land free of any easements. Those expectations have been thwarted … solely because of the operation of the Rails-to-Trails Act.”

The Act wasn’t stripped from the books, but it was still satisfying for the Glosemeyers to have their principles validated by the same government who had wronged them. In the United States, property rights are protected by the Bill of Rights, and yet sometimes those rights don’t hold. At best, the government makes reparations. It’s a way of apologizing, of acknowledging that the ends don’t necessarily justify the means, even in the interests of the greater good.

Their day in court ended with a final admission from Justice Holmes: “A strong public desire to improve the public condition is not enough to warrant achieving the desire by a shorter cut than the constitutional way of paying for the change.”

Land battle narratives are as old as the United States. One only has to remember the displacement of American Indians. Later, as settlers journeyed westward and resources like timber, water, and minerals were snatched up and sometimes irreversibly depleted, national leaders began calling for limits—but not without criticism. The first national park in the world, Yellowstone, was created by Ulysses S. Grant in 1872, and the Helena Gazette called it “a great blow to the prosperity” of the region. When Teddy Roosevelt proposed protecting the Grand Canyon, opponents in nearby Williams, Arizona, described “a fiendish and diabolical scheme.”

It’s a heritage that makes Dan Burkhardt chuckle. Just like Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon, he says, the Katy Trail “was for the greater good.”

Trail proponents often point to the economic opportunities of the trail. One quick internet search reveals plenty of trail-centric businesses—bike tourism operators, trailside
cafes, and trailside bed and breakfasts. Sometimes, these businesses are on the same land previously disputed by trail opponents.

Carl Lensing of Bluffton, for example, was an outspoken opponent of the Katy Trail and likely remained bitter about the ordeal until his death. But that anger doesn’t stretch beyond the grave. His son and daughter-in-law, Brian and Melissa, inherited the property. They plan to build a bed and breakfast for trail-bound clients.

“We just accept that the trail is part of the story,” Melissa says. She already has the décor picked out—the living room will be train-themed. Outside, she wants the business to feel welcoming to cyclists. “The bikers are probably going to be our best customers because [the trail] is literally in our front yard.”

The miles of former MKT Railroad corridor between Rhineland and Marthasville formed the hotbed of dissent for the building of the Katy Trail. Photo by Rose Hansen.

Capturing economic opportunities that the Katy Trail offers is at the forefront of Melissa’s mind. She’s also the Executive Director of the Hermann Chamber of Commerce, and she wants to make the city more
bicycle-friendly. “I do know this: biking tourism is one of the fastest-growing tourism sources out there right now,” she says. “I think we’ve got to find ways to improve, to be a little bit more biker-friendly. We don’t even have bike stands.”

Across the river in Rhineland, lifetime resident Katie Muenks has added another business to her roster: The Corner. She also owns the iconic bed and breakfast, Shining Hope, housed in a pre-Civil War log cabin whose sprawling front lawn ends at the Katy Trail.

Trail-dependent businesses span the state from end to end. In Windsor, Kim Henderson credits the trail for launching her business. “The trails are why I put the cabins in,” she says, though she doesn’t track what percentage of clientele are trail-users. “I’m sure it’s over 50 percent. I get a lot of people. We could only sleep 17 people in Windsor when I first put a cabin in. We can now sleep over 75 people. Even on some weeknights, you can’t find a bed in Windsor.”

Perhaps no city along the Katy has seen as much economic revival as Rocheport. With its wineries, antique stores, and scenic perch on the Missouri River, the town often appears on Best Small Town lists in publications like Southern Living and The Kansas City Star. Conrad Yates, a longtime alderman who also runs a bed and breakfast, has actively aided the restoration of its historical downtown for the last 30 years. But to credit Rocheport’s recovery solely to the Katy Trail, he says, is an oversimplification.

“In the beginning, there was the general perception that every single town along the Katy Trail would be saved, that it would restore [the] economy to those small whistlestops and allow something to rise up and become successful commercially,” he says. “People assume most of Rocheport’s business comes from the Katy Trail, but it doesn’t. We have the great blessing of being on, possibly, the most beautiful section of the Katy Trail, and we’re close to Interstate 70. So that gives us quick access from a whole lot of different populations of people. And Rocheport was named by the Kansas City Star as a favorite day trip.” Yates says. “The town of Rocheport itself is primarily based on tourism. The Katy Trail was at the root. It played a role, but there wasn’t any single thing which would be entirely responsible for that rebirth. It was the fortunate intersection of many contributing factors.”

The stretch of the Katy Trail near Rocheport is throught to be among the most scenic, in part because of features such as limestone bluffs and the railroad tunnel pictured here. Photo by Rose Hansen.

In Missouri, public lands compose less than 10 percent of the state. But acre-by-acre, it’s increasing. Rural areas suffer steady population decline, and urban centers continue to grow. Can the people of Missouri accept a new culture that, for better and for worse, chips away the old one? So many of the farmers involved in the original battle against the Katy Trail have passed away, and with them, their stories and all those hard feelings. The feelings may be forgotten in a matter of generations. Perhaps sooner.

Whenever a cyclist knocks on Jayne Glosemeyer’s front door to ask for a ride into town or for tools to make repairs, she politely complies. In the country, people help each other. That’s just how she was raised, but she also uses the opportunity to share her side of the story. “A lot of them say, ‘We didn’t know that!’ But they’re so happy to have a trail.” Even now, all these years later, her voice still trembles when she talks about it.

To Jayne, the persistent problem with the Katy Trail isn’t the trail or its users, but in the predominant narrative of its triumph and the willful ignorance of its costs. There were political, intellectual, and Constitutional compromises made in order for the Katy Trail to exist as it’s known today. These are inconvenient truths for the pro-trail sects and their blissful beneficiaries. To the Glosemeyers, it’s just proof that we live in a nation shaped by theft and half-hearted reparations. They aren’t the first to feel this way. Certainly, the Native Americans of the Missouri River Valley would agree with that sentiment, too.

Maurice swears that their children have been instilled with a proper sense of history about what their parents fought for along the Katy Trail. Will the generation after that inherit those same resentments and values? It’s hard to say.

The Katy Trail is among Missouri’s most popular state parks. The Department of Natural Resources estimates that over 400,000 visitors use it every year, generating some $18.5 million in revenue. With any luck, the Lensing’s bed and breakfast will be open in time to earn a share of that business. Katie Muenks hopes cyclists will stop at The Corner for a Reuben and a piece of pie. The Glosemeyers can see the Katy Trail from their house; it still divides their property. It’s a good vantage point for keeping an eye on their grandchildren, who set up a stand and sell lemonade to passersby on the Katy during the summer.

Ranching in the Future

Here’s an excellent article explaining the impossibility of entry level ranchers and farmers.  Unless land and agriculture prices come to a reckoning, land will be owned by the wealthy and worked by those with a passion for land management.  We are headed that way culturally rapidly given the advanced age of current land owners.  With few heirs waiting to farm or ranch, the land will sell to the highest bidder far above its production value.

Shalom!

tauna

Ranching in the Future – What Should Young Ranchers Expect?

By   /  January 7, 2019  /  4 Comments

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I recently received a note from a young friend (let’s call her Peggy Sue) who desperately wants to be a rancher. Since her childhood she has dreamed of working with animals. She has learned about marketing and economics. She’s studied hard and become a competent grazier. She’s done some hard work. But she’s getting a little impatient.

“So, I’ve been looking at real estate ads all over the country, studying up on productivity of land in different places, trying to look up how many acres per cow it takes and how much each acre costs, and I just can’t figure this thing out. How are people doing it? I mean, how are people able to buy a ranch and pay for it by raising cattle?”

My immediate answer was not what she had been hoping for:

“I don’t know of anyone in America who is buying a ranch and paying for it by running cattle. This doesn’t mean you can never be a rancher—you can be. But going forward, you will only be successful as a rancher if you accept the realities of the current world. You must be able to adopt a definition of ranch and rancher that fits in the economic universe in which you currently live. And guess what? This is true for every other new rancher, too.”

Sorry, Peggy Sue.

Past, Present and Future Ranching Models

Both my wife’s and my own family trees are well stocked with hopeful people who put together ranching operations 100 or more years ago. First was homesteading, and later on there was picking up the pieces from other folks whose homesteads had failed. There was hard work and sacrifice. Fundamentally, the ranches of 100 years ago were founded on using land to grow grass and cattle. Land values were tied intimately to productive value of the land and the then-current values of the cattle market. And so, our ancestors built successful ranches.

Those days are over. The conditions under which our ancestors operated no longer exist.

Today, properties do not become available through homesteading or abandonment, and in general, ranch land prices have very little relationship to productive value. Other influences such as hunting and fishing, scenic view, and privacy are the determining factors in land price. The model described above: working hard to build functional ranches by acquiring and paying for land with cattle, is apparently not possible in today’s world.

In our own little valley, even though there is virtually no influence by hunting or fishing values or high mountain views, the value of land has now risen to the point where pastureland prices are clearly irrational. Turns out, there are plenty of people with plenty of money who just want to live in the country, and they will pay whatever it takes. In the 1980s, I told Ranching for Profit guru Stan Parsons that my chief concern with becoming a rancher was that land in my area was selling for $5,000 per cow unit. Currently, that value is more like $20,000. At $20,000, the land overhead PITI (Principle, Interest, Taxes, Insurance) is something like $2,000 per cow per year.

It should be mathematically obvious that the current land value situation absolutely precludes the possibility of becoming a rancher, if you think ranching has to look like it did 100 years ago.

So, is it possible for my young friend to become a rancher? Absolutely. But that will require her to accept a different definition of what ranching looks like and of what being a rancher means.

Going Forward: Ranchers of the Future

A principle of motion discovered by Sir Isaac Newton over 300 years ago applies directly here, I think:

I believe the trends that we have witnessed in ranching over the past 100 years or so will likely continue. These trends will determine what ranching will look like going forward, and the possibilities for present and future ranchers.

Here are some current trends to consider:

Land Prices

I believe the price of land will continue to escalate and will have less and less relationship to productive value. This means new ranchers will need to seek models that do not include “buying a ranch and paying for it with cattle.”

Other Input Costs

The cost of oil, iron, processed feed, and other inputs will continue to advance relative to the value of traditional ranch products. Future ranchers need to design models that place less emphasis on these things.

Technology

Our industry has become highly dependent upon technology. Whether this is a good thing or not is hard for me to tease out. That said, ranches of the future will surely include more technology. Ranchers of the future should build business models that take advantage of new technologies. This is certainly critical for businesses that involve direct marketing.

Societal/Political Change

There has been sweeping change in the relationship between urban and rural populations. Our urban neighbors are ever more interested in ecological issues, animal welfare, food safety, transportation, and on and on. Going forward, this trend will result in a higher degree of regulation of ranching activities on all fronts. Young ranchers should plan accordingly.

Diversity of Products and Services

Increasingly, ranches have become more and more involved in producing things beyond just meat on the hoof. Young ranchers of the future should consider business models that include providing even more diverse products and services. Growing hamburger is a low margin enterprise. Providing sites for weddings, hunting, vacations, etc. can be very high-margin enterprises. Like it or not, this may be what opportunity looks like in the future.

The Decline of the Rugged Individual

It seems to me that image of the rancher as a rugged, independent operator has always been a bit overblown. My great grandparents (and every generation since) were highly dependent on cooperation for survival. Going forward, I believe ranching will look more and more like other industries, with intensely complicated, inter-dependent systems of producers, suppliers, marketers and customers. Ranches will offer a wider and wider range of services, and they will serve a wider range of customers. No ranch will be an island unto itself.

(The exception to this will be the ranches that are owned outright by folks who have un-limited assets, and so, can do anything they want. These may be ranches, but I question whether they are Ranch Businesses.)

The Big Question: To Own, or Not to Own

Oregon author William Kittredge wrote a fine biography called “Owning it All”, a story about growing up in the big ranch country of the American West. I think young ranchers should consider exactly the opposite course: Owning almost nothing. And here’s some of what that might look like:

Owning portable fencing, corrals, and water equipment. Renting or leasing grass that land owners don’t want or don’t know how to manage. Same goes for livestock. Selling your expertise and skills as a grass and property manager. Becoming expert in managing the accessory enterprises that ranches will contain in the future: tourism, education, entertainment, recreation, sport, etc. Note: be sure to make enough profit to fund your own retirement, as you will not be accumulating any real estate.

Decisions, Decisions.

I could be wrong about all of the predictions above. Maybe land costs will magically revert to align with productive value. Maybe young ranchers will be able to enter the industry, buy some land and livestock and make out just fine. Maybe. But I doubt it. I think young ranchers would be well advised to conjure up a business plan that includes the parameters and limitations we now operate under, and think carefully about what the future might look like.

Best wishes to Peggy Sue in the coming year. Oh, and to the ranchers of the next 100 years, too!

Happy Grazing, Happy New Year, and a Happy Future

John Marble

Stay tuned for future articles with examples of how young farmers and ranchers are building their businesses.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Marble grew up on a terribly conventional ranch with a large family where each kid had their own tractor. Surviving that, he now owns a small grazing and marketing operation that focuses on producing value through managed grazing. He oversees a diverse ranching operation, renting and owning cattle and grasslands while managing timber, wildlife habitat and human relationships. His multi-species approach includes meat goats, pointing dogs and barn cats. He has a life-long interest in ecology, trying to understand how plants, animals, soils and humans fit together. John spends his late-night hours working on fiction, writing about worlds much less strange than this one.

If I Knew

This poem has been around for a long time, but I came across it again on a sheet that was shuffled together with other collected papers.

 

IF I KNEW

If I knew it would be the last time that I’d see you fall asleep,                                               I would tuck you in more tightly and pray the Lord your soul to keep.

If I knew it would be the last time that I see you walk out the door,                                     I would give you a hug and kiss and call you back for one more.

If I knew it would be the last time I’d hear your voice lifted up in praise,                          I would video tape each action and word, so I could play them back day after day.

For surely there’s always tomorrow to make up for an oversight,                                  And we always get a second chance to make everything right.

There will always be another day to say our “I love you’s,”                                                   And certainly there’s another chance to say our “Anything I can do’s?

But just in case I might be wrong, and today is all I get,                                                              I’d like to say how much I love you and I hope we never forget.

Tomorrow is not promised to anyone, young or old alike,                                                          And today may be the last chance you get to hold your love one tight.

So if you’re waiting for tomorrow, why not do it today?                                                               For if tomorrow never comes, you’ll surely regret the day.

That you didn’t take that extra time for a smile, a hug, or a kiss                                            And you were too busy to grant someone, what turned out to be their one last wish.

So hold your loved ones close today, and whisper in their ear,                                             That you love them very much and you’ll always hold them dear.

Take time to say “I’m sorry,” “Please forgive me,” “thank you,” or “it’s okay,”                   And if tomorrow never comes, you’ll have no regrets about today.

Norma Cornett Marek

 

Pleasant Shade Cemetery

About six years ago, i started hacking away at the brush, weeds, and sprouts which had engulfed a tiny cemetery at the corner of what was my grandpa’s land (he gave it to me later).  All the time i was growing up and ‘helping’ Grandpa Falconer with his cattle chores, i’d been told it was a ‘black’ cemetery.  It was never cared for and i thought nothing of it.  Once i started clearing it, i discovered there were six stones, three of which had actual names and information on them.  Once I had it sufficiently cleared, then son Dallas has taken over with mowing and weed eating and keeping the site maintained nicely these past three years.  We had made a quick sign on which he had free hand painted the name of the cemetery but by this spring it needed a makeover.  So he sanded it down, i printed off new letters and traced them on and hand painted them and sealed the sign.  However, this is the last time i’ll spend so much time; next time i’ll hire a professional sign made – just too time consuming and it probably won’t last more than 2-3 years.  There is no budget for this project, but we have enjoyed making the nearly forgotten cemetery beautiful again.

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This was taken in 2014 before we had made the sign, but had already made the area safe (not tearing up the lawnmower) to mow.  Bearing in mind that none of this could be seen just two years previous.  Completely engulfed in head high brush!

So, how did i discover the name of the cemetery?!  I just did some looking about on the internet and discovered a fantastic list of cemeteries in Linn County, Missouri on the Roots web page, but recently it was closed and i was disheartened, but i kept looking and someone ( thank you, Sherry Baker!) had picked it up and started a new site to maintain this list!   The link is here but i’ve also copied it in its entirety below.  I was really excited to find that this little cemetery had an actual name.    Pleasant Shade Cemetery.

 

Back to Linn County

Linn County MO Cemeteries
Location and Directions

Our thanks to Sherry Baker for this information!
Thanks also to Reta Riley for the second McCollum Cemetery info!

Cemetery Name Directions
Abbot Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S28-T60N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy HH, about 2 1/2 miles west of New Boston, go north on Hwy HH about 3 miles to a dirt lane going west. Go west on this lane about 1/4 mile to the west end of a bend in the lane. Walk south on the ridge about 250 yards; cemetery is on the west side of the ridge and is marked by an iron fence around the single remaining grave.
Anderson Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S29-T58N-R18W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy U, north of Marceline, go north on Hwy U about 4 miles, then go west on a gravel road about 1/4 mile. The cemetery is about 50 yards west of a two-story home and about 10-15 yards south of the road.
Baker, Andrew Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S7-T59N-R18W. From the intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy PP north of Brookfield, go south on a gravel road about 600 yards to the ridge top. Here a private dirt lane leads to the cemetery. The dirt lane goes west for about 1/4 mile then turns south for about 1/4 mile to a fence line. Thru a gate, the lane goes south on a ridge, but the cemetery is on the next ridge to the west and about 50 yards south of an old house (about 1/4 mile south of the fence gate).
Baker, Bolin Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S17-T59N-R18W. From St. Catharine, go north on Hwy 11 about 8 1/2 miles to a gravel road going east. Go east for about 1 3/4 miles, then turn south and go about 1/4 mile. At an intersection bear to the right (southwest). Continue southwest for about 1/8 mile; cemetery is west of the road about 300 yards on a ridge.
Baker-Findley Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S20-T60N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy PP, go north on Hwy PP to end (about 4 1/2 miles). Turn left (west) on a gravel road and go about 1/4 mile. Cemetery is south of the road 75-100 yards and is south of a tin barn and tin grain bin.
Baker, G. V. Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S17-T60N-R21W. From Meadville, go north on Hwy 139 about 16 miles to Hwy MM; then go east on MM about 1 1/2 miles. Turn south on a gravel road and go 1 mile, then turn left (east). Go east 1 mile then turn left (north). Go north about 0.3 mile; cemetery is west of the road about 125 yards.
Baker, George W. Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S11-T60N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy O and Hwy OO at North Salem, go south on Hwy OO 0.2 mile to a private drive leading west from highway toward an old house and barn. This lane is about 100 yards north of the church; follow lane west to just east of the old house then go south and southwest along the ridge. Stay on the west side of the barn then follow ridge to where ridge drops off sharply; an old pond will be to the left and below the cemetery.
Baker, Jerome Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S8-T60N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy PP, west of New Boston, go north on Hwy PP to end of state maintenance then turn right (east). Follow gravel road east then north about 1 1/2 miles to an intersection of gravel roads. In the northwest corner of this intersection is a gate to a farm field. Cemetery is accessible only by 4-wheel drive vehicle and then only in dry weather.
Bailey Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S22-T59N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy C and Hwy V, go south on Hwy V about 3 miles then turn left (east) on a gravel road where Hwy V curves to the south. Go east about 1/4 mile where a gravel road turns north. Continue east through the field; cemetery was somewhere over crest of ridge, probably north of the field lane.
Banning Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S31-T58N-R19W. From Brookfield, go north on Hwy M about 1/2 mile, then turn right (east) on a gravel road. Go east 1 mile to an intersection with another gravel road going north; cemetery is about 25 yards south of the road in a clump of trees.
Baugher Cemetery* Located in SE 1/4 S32-T59N-R18W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy U, north of Marceline, go north on Hwy U about 7 miles. Here the road bends to the east; go past the bend about 3/4 mile (the road again bends east). At this second bend, a gravel drive goes north. Follow this land about 0.7 mile, going north at the split in the road; cemetery is on the left (west) side of the road about 100-150 yards north of the split. Follow road to north end of Switzer Chapel Cemetery, then on foot, follow right hand branch of trail. At bottom of hill, the trail is going east; continue east along the fence to where a fence line goes north; cemetery is about 300 yards north of this point on east side of fence.
Bear Branch Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S16-T59N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy C and Hwy V, go south on Hwy V about 1 mile then turn right (west) on a gravel road. Follow gravel road about 1/4 mile, then turn left (south) for 1/4 mile; church and cemetery are on east side of road.
Becket Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S16-T58N-R20W. From Linneus, go east on Hwy P about 2 miles to where road curves sharply to the north. Take a gravel road east, then south. Go south about 2.3 miles; cemetery is east of road about 125 yards.
Bethel Cemetery(East Strawberry)* Located in SE 1/4 S32-T59N-R21W. From intersection of Hwy 139 and Hwy B north of Meadville, go east on Hwy B 2 miles to a gravel road going north. Go north on the gravel road about 50 yards; cemetery is on west side of the road.
Botts Cemetery* Located in SW 1/4 S18-T58N-R21W. From Meadville, go north on Hwy 139 about 3 miles; cemetery is on east of road just north of a gravel road going east.
Bowyer Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S2-T58N-R21W. From Linneus, go south on Hwy 5 about 1/4 mile to first gravel road west. Go west about 1/2 mile, then turn north at a four-way intersection. Follow road north then northwest about 1 mile to end of road. Cemetery is about 150 yards south of a driveway in a group of trees.
Brown Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S18-T59N-R20W. From Purdin, go south on Hwy 5 to first gravel road west. Go west on gravel road about 3/4 mile to intersection; cemetery is southeast about 100-150 yards east and 50 yards south of road.
Brownlee Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S22-T58N-R18W. This cemetery is listed in the 1883 Linn County History, page 647, but no trace of it has been found.
Bull Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S13-T60N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy C, go west on Hwy C about 1/4 mile, then go north on Hwy CC. Continue north on Hwy CC about 4 3/4 miles; cemetery is less than 1/4 mile north of intersection with the 3rd gravel road going east. Cemetery is at a much lower elevation than road and cannot be easily seen approaching from the south. It is now marked by 3 large cedar trees, and is about 150 yards from road.
Calhoun Cemetery* Located in SW 1/4 S11-T60N-R21W. From Browning, go west on Hwy MM about 3 1/2 miles. Cemetery is about 220 yards south of road and is best reached by a private drive to the house, then cemetery is about 100 yards east.
Calvary Baptist (Garner) Cemetery Also known as Garner Cemetery
Located in SW 1/4 S36-T60N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy C, go west on Hwy C about 1/4 mile, then go north on Hwy CC. Continue north on Hwy CC just over 1 mile; cemetery & church are on west side of road.
Cash Cemetery* Located in NW 1/4 S15-T57N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy 129, go west on Hwy 36 about 1/2 mile, then turn south on a gravel road and go about 0.3 mile; cemetery is west of road about 550-600 yards.
Cassity Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S30-T59N-R20W. From Linneus, go north on Hwy 5 about 1 1/2 miles to a gravel road east. Go east on this road bending south for about 1/4 mile to a private drive next to a farm home. Follow drive east past house and barn about 1/4 mile to cemetery; cemetery is on right side of lane just past a pond.
Cherry Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S23-T59N-R21W. From Linneus, go north on Hwy 5 about 1 12/ miles to first gravel road west. Go west about 1 1/2 miles to where the road turns north, then go north about 3/4 mile. Cemetery is west of the road about 75 yards.
Couch Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S36-T59N-R21W. From intersection of Hwy 5, Hwy B and Hwy P in Linneus, go north on Hwy 5 four blocks then turn west. Follow this street west about 1 1/4 miles to entrance of Linneus City Lake. Turn into Lake entrance and drive to spillway. At spillway, walk north about 300 yards up ridge; cemetery is on east side of ridge in a clump of trees.
Coulson Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S15-T58N-R18W. This cemetery is listed in the 1883 Linn County History, page 647. It no longer exists and stones were reportedly moved to the Wyandotte Cemetery by George Coulson.
County Farm Cemetery From Linneus, go west on Hwy B about 0.9 mile; cemetery was on north side of road, north of a red shet and near the timber line on the north slope of a steep hill. No stones are presently found.
Crail & Moore Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S1-T59N-R18W. From New Boston, go south on Hwy 129 a short distance past the church in the southeast corner of New Boston; cemetery is east of the road on a ridge about 125 yards from highway. The single burial here was reportedly moved to the Helton Cemetery in Macon County.
Dry Ridge Cemetery* Also known as Bennett and Mundell.
Located in SW 1/4 S13-T60N-R21W. From Browning, go west on Hwy MM from Hwy 5 about 2 1/4 miles to jct. Hwy Z. Turn south on gravel road (Z goes north) about 1 1/4 miles to cemetery on east side of road.
Dryden Cemetery* Located in SW 1/4 S19-T59N-R20W. From Linneus, go north on Hwy 5 about 1 1/2 miles to second gravel road west. Go west then north on this gravel road about 9/10 mile; cemetery is on right (east) side of road.
Elmwood Cemetery (IOOF)* Located in SE 1/4 S20-T57N-R18W. From Marceline, go north on Hwy 5 to city limit, then east on a gravel road 1/2 mile. Turn north on another gravel road approximately 1/8 mile beyond railroad tracks. Cemetery is on left side of the road.
Enterprise Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S13-T60N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy O and Hwy KK (about 3 miles east of Browning), go east on Hwy O about 1 1/4 miles, then turn right (south) on a gravel road; go south about 0.8 mile to first gravel lane; turn right (west). Follow this road 0.4 mile to cemetery on left.
Ford Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 S1-T59N-R22W. The site stands on the east bank of Smokey Creek in the timber. The two stones have probably been moved from their original location.
Fore Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S32-T59N-R20W. From Linneus, go east on Hwy P about 1 1/2 miles to first gravel road north. Go north 1 mile, then go west about 1/8 mile; cemetery is about 250 yards south of road.
Forman Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S32-T57N-R21W. From intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy W, south of Meadville, go south on Hwy W about 4 1/2 miles and where the highway curves west, continue south but quickly turn left (east) on a gravel road. Go east about 1 1/2 miles to a parking area at end of road. Cemetery is about 100 yards north, marked by some large trees.
Fosher Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S24-T59N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy M and Hwy C north of Brookfield, go south on Hwy M about 3 miles to a gravel road going west. Go west about 1/4 mile; cemetery is on the right (north) side of the road.
Gilmer Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S31-T60N-R20W. From Purdin, go north on Hwy 5 from junction with Hwy C about 1/2 mile, then right on a gravel road. Follow road, keeping left past an intersection and then a private drive to a bridge over Lowes Branch. Go past the bridge 300-350 yards; the bottom ground on the left should start sharply uphill. Follow this contour west about 1/4 mile to the second ridge. Cemetery is up on the ridge just north of a pipeline.
Gooch Cemetery* Located in SE 1/4 S29-T60N-R20W. From Purdin, go north on Hwy 5 to 4th road going east. Go east 1/4 mile, then south 1/4 mile, then east about 1 1/4 miles. Turn south and go about 1/4 mile; road leads right to cemetery.
Grantsville Cemetery* Located in SW 1/4 S11-T59N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy C and Hwy KK east of Purdin, go south on a gravel road about 1 mile, then turn left (east). Go east about 1/2 mile; cemetery is on left (north) side of road about 100 yards.
Grove Hill Cemetery
Also known as Guyer Baptist Cemetery
Located in NW 1/4 S9-T59N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy C and Hwy V, go south on Hwy V about 1/2 mile; cemetery is on west side of road.
Hayes Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S31-T60N-R21W. From Meadville, go north on Hwy 139 about 13 miles to Hwy DD; turn right (east) on DD and go 1/2 mile. Cemetery is about 100 yards south of road on west side of fence.
Haseville Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S13-T60N-R22W. From Meadville, go north about 16 miles on Hwy 139 to Hwy E; then go west on Hwy E about 1/4 mile; cemetery is on the left (south) side of the road east of the church.
Hooker Cemetery* Located in NE 1/4 S16-T60N-R21W. From Browning, go west on Hwy MM about 4 1/2 miles then turn south on a gravel road. Go south about 3/4 mile; cemetery is about 50 yards west of the road just before a ´T´ intersection.
Jenkins Cemetery* Located in SE corner S17-T60N-R20W. Go east on Hwy O from Browning about 3/4 mile to a gravel road south. Go south about 1 1/2 miles to cemetery on right. Or, go south on Hwy 5 about 1 1/2 miles then east on a gravel road about one mile plus; cemetery on left at a ´T´ intersection.
Jones Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S10-T59N-R20W. From Purdin, go east on Hwy C to Hwy KK, then south on a gravel road about 1 mile, then turn right (west). Go west about 3/4 mile to a farm house on north side of road. The cemetery was probably about 3/8 mile north of the house; stones were found in a pile of old fence posts about 200 yards north of the probable cemetery site.
Keithley Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S8-T60N-R21W. From Meadville, go north on Hwy 139 about 16 miles to Hwy MM; then go east on MM to Hwy DD. Hwy DD goes north; cemetery is about 1/2 mile south (but no road). Cemetery can be reached from a private drive which is about 1/8 mile east of the intersection of MM & DD; this lane goes south then southwest and passes right by the cemetery.
Kille & Pace Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S20-T59N-R19W. From Brookfield, go north on Hwy M to Hwy V (about 4 miles); turn east on Hwy V and go about 2 1/2 miles, then north about 5 1/2 miles to a gravel road to the west. Go west on gravel road about 1/4 mile, then turn south. Go past Bear Branch Church to end of road (about 1/2 mile). Cemetery is about 3/4 mile southwest across fields and pastures on a bluff about 100 yards east of and overlooking Bear Creek.
King Cemetery Located in S34-T58N-R19W, east of the Dick King home.
Kirk Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S36-T61N-R19W. From Browning, go east on Hwy O about 9 1/2 miles to intersection of Hwy O and Hwy OO; continue east about 3/10 mile; cemetery is located north of Hwy O about 200 yards from road. (Better go east 1/10 mile further and enter a private lane; go north on lane behind old abandoned house, through an ´S´, where lane turns north again. Cemetery is now about 150 yards west of this point in a grove of trees.)
Laclede City Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S6-T57N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy 5 at Laclede, go north on Hwy 5 about 1/4 mile; cemetery is on the left (west) side of the highway.
Liberty Memorial Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S10-T58N-R20W. From Brookfield, go west on Hwy 36 to Hwy FF, then north on Hwy FF to end of blacktop (about 5 miles). Continue north on gravel road about 1 mile; cemetery is west of the road in the southwest corner of a 2-acre plot.
Linhart Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S15-T58N-R19W. From St. Catharine, go north on Hwy 11 about 3 miles to a gravel road; go west on this gravel road about 1 1/4 mile to another gravel road going south; cemetery is in southwest corner of this intersection.
Linn-Bethel/Grant Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S8-T57N-R21W. From intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy 139, go east on Hwy 36 about 2 miles and turn south on a gravel road. Go south about 1/4 mile and enter a dirt lane on the right (west) side of the gravel road. Follow this lane west about 1/4 mile to cemetery.
Locust Creek Cemetery Located NW 1/4 S18-T57N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy 139, go south on Hwy 139 about 1 1/2 miles then turn right (west) on a gravel road. Go west about 1 mile then turn right (north) on another gravel road. Go north about 200 yards; cemetery will be east of the road about 75 yards behind an old school house or church.
Long Branch Crossing Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S18-T58N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy M and Hwy P north of Brookfield, go north on Hwy M about 5/8 mile. Cemetery is about 325 yards east of road. Best to go north of the Long Branch bridge and walk along the north side of Long Branch, going east to a sharp bend, where a very high bluff has eroded badly. Cemetery is toward south end of this bluff just north of a fence line.
Magnolia Cemetery Located S22-T59N-R21W. From Linneus, go west on Hwy B about 3 miles to Hwy Y, then north on Hwy Y about 2 1/2 miles; cemetery is on east side of the road.
Martin Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S34-T59N-R20W. From Linneus, go east on hwy P about 3 1/2 miles from Hwy 5 to a gravel road going north. Go north on this gravel road about 200-250 yards; cemetery is on west side of road.
Masonic Cemetery, Bucklin Located in SW 1/4 S35-T58N-R18W. From intersection of Park & 5th in Bucklin, go west across railroad tracks then turn right. This road leads to two entrances to the Bucklin Masonic Cemetery.
Maxwell Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 and NE 1/4 S4-T57N-R20W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy FF (west of Brookfield), go west on Hwy 36 about 1/2 mile then turn right (north) on a gravel road. Go north 1/2 mile then turn left (west) on another gravel road. Go west about 500 feet; cemetery is about 35 feet north of a fence. Only one stone remains.
McBeth Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S18-T57N-R19W. From St. Michael’s Cemetery, go west on a gravel road about 1600 feet; the stones are in a barn yard on the south side of the road.
McCollum Cemetery – Yellow Creek Township* Located in SE 1/4 S7-T58N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy U and Hwy 36, north of Marceline, go north on Hwy U between 7 1/2 and 8 miles to fifth road to the west. Turn west and go about 1/2 mile; cemetery is on the left (south) side of the road 50-75 yards from road.
McCollum Cemetery – North Salem Township Located in S17-T56N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy PP, go north on Hwy PP about five miles to end of blacktop; turn left (west) on gravel road. Just before first curve in the gravel road, bear right on lane that goes to an old house. At field gate, walk about 150-200 yards along path into timber; cemetery is in timber on left of path.
Meadville Cemetery Located in NW S6-T57N-R21W and SW S 31-T58N-R21W. From Meadville, go north on Hwy 139 to where the Hwy curves to the west. Go west about one block; cemetery is on both sides of the road.
Mennonite Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S5-T58N-R20W. From Linneus, go east on Hwy P about 1.8 mile; cemetery is on south side of hwy on curve where hwy turns north (just west of church).
Moore Cemetery Located in S33-T59N-R18W. No other information is available about this cemetery
Moore-Mullins Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S9-T58N-R20W. From Linneus, go east on Hwy P about 2 miles to where road curves sharply to the north. Take a gravel road east then south. Go south about 1 mile; cemetery is on left (east) side of road about 200 yards east of road.
Morris Chapel Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S4-T59N-R21W. From Linneus, go west on Hwy B about 3 miles to Hwy Y, then north on Hwy Y about 6 miles. Turn left (west) on a gravel road, then go about 1/4 mile to Morris Chapel Church & Cemetery.
Mount Olive Cemetery* Located in NE 1/4 S6-T59N-R21W. From Meadville, go north on Hwy 139 about 13 miles to Hwy DD; turn right (east) and go 1 mile. Turn right (south) here and follow gravel road about 1 1/4 miles to drive leading to cemetery, about 1/4 mile west of gravel road.
Mount Olivet Cemetery(formerly Roselawn Cemetery) Located in SE 1/4 S30-T57N-R18W. From intersection of Kansas Avenue and Santa Fe Street in Marceline, go west on Santa Fe about five blocks; street ends at cemetery.
Murrain Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S3-T58N-R20W. From Brookfield, go west on Hwy 36 to Hwy FF, then north on Hwy FF to end of blacktop (about 5 miles). Continue north on gravel road about 1.3 miles; cemetery is on west side of road.
Nester Chapel Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S4–T59N-R18W. From the intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy HH, about 2 1/2 miles west of New Boston, go west on Hwy 11 about 3/4 mile then turn right (north) on a gravel road. Go north about 1/4 mile; cemetery and church are on the left (west) side of the road.
New Boston Cemetery Located in Sw 1/4 S1-T59N-R18W. Cemetery is on the north side of Hwy 129 about 1/2 mile west of New Boston.
New Garden Cemetery* Located in SE 1/4 S8-T58N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy M and Hwy P north of Brookfield, go east on a gravel road 1 1/2 miles, then north 1 mile, then east about 1/4 mile. Cemetery is on the left (north) side of the road.
North Salem Cemetery Located in Sw 1/4 S11-T60N-R19W. Cemetery is at south end of North Salem, MO on Hwy OO, about 0.4 mile from Hwy O.
North Swedish Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S24-T59N-R18W. Cemetery and church are on the west side of Hwy 129 3 miles south of New Boston or 8 miles north of Bucklin, and about 1/2 mile north of the intersection with Hwy U.
Ogle Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S28-T60N-R20W. From Purdin, east on Hwy C from Hwy 5 about 2 1/2 miles to Hwy KK, then north about 2 3/4 miles to a gravel road going west. Proceed west about 1 1/4 miles nearly to top of hill just past first gravel road to north. Cemetery is directly south about 1/4 mile. Go down hill, across stream bed and up the next hill to a grove of trees.
Old Bucklin Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S35-T58N-R18W. From intersection of Park & 5th in Bucklin, go west across railroad tracks then turn right. This road leads to two entrances to the Bucklin Masonic Cemetery. Go past these entrances and follow the road about 0.4 mile to the cemetery at end of road.
Old Linneus Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S1-T58N-R21W. From intersection of Hwy 5 and Sandusky Street in Linneus, go west on Sandusky Street about two blocks; cemetery is on north side of street at edge of town.
Old New Garden Cemetery Located in NW corner S3-T57N-R19W. From Brookfield, go east on Hwy 11 about 1 3/4 miles just past County Club entrance to gravel road going south. Go south on this road a few yards, then turn east. Continue east; cemetery at end of road. Located in NW corner S3-T57N-R19W. From Brookfield, go east on Hwy 11 about 1 3/4 miles just past Country Club entrance to gravel road going south. Go south on this road a few yards, then turn east. Continue east; cemetery is at end of road.
Park Lawn Memory Gardens Located in NE 1/4 S11-T57N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy 36 and Business 36 in Brookfield, go west a short distance to cemetery entrance.
Parsons Creek Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S36-T59N-R22W. From intersection of Hwy 139 and Hwy B north of Meadville, go west on Hwy B about 1 mile then turn north on a gravel road. Go north about 1/2 mile; cemetery is on east side of road near intersection of two gravel roads.
Patterson Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S10-T58N-R22W. From intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy EE west of Meadville, go north on Hwy EE 5 miles to end of blacktop. Turn left (west) and go 3/4 mile, then turn right (north) and go about 0.4 mile to a gravel lane going east. Enter lane and go 1/4 mile; cemetery is south of lane about 200 yards.
Peavler Cemetery* Located in NW 1/4 S14-T60N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy O and Hwy OO at North Salem, go south on Hwy OO through New Salem, then go east at church and cemetery, then south again on a gravel road. Go about 1 mile to where road turns left (west); cemetery is just a few yards southeast of this corner.
Phillips Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S32-T60N-R21W. From Meadville, go north on Hwy 139 about 13 miles to Hwy DD; then go east on Hwy DD 1 mile and turn south on a gravel road. Go south 1 mile then turn left (east) on a gravel road. Go east about 1/8 mile; cemetery is north of the road about 175 yards.
Pierce Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S1-T59N-R21W. Go north from Purdin on Hwy 5 to 3rd gravel road west (about 1 1/2 miles). Go west on gravel road about 1/2 mile; road turns south. Cemetery is about 100 yards south and on left (east) side of road.
Pleasant Grove North Cemetery* Located in NW 1/4 and SW 1/4 S26-T59N-R18W. From Bucklin, go north on Hwy 129 to Hwy U, turn left (west) on Hwy U and go 1 1/4 miles to cemetery on both sides of road. Church and old part of cemetery are north of the road; new part of cemetery is south of the road.
Pleasant Grove South Cemetery* Located in NW 1/4 and SW 1/4 S26-T59N-R18W. From Bucklin, go north on Hwy 129 to Hwy U, turn left (west) on Hwy U and go 1 1/4 miles to cemetery on both sides of road. Church and old part of cemetery are north of the road; new part of cemetery is south of the road.
Pleasant Shade Cemetery Located in NW corner S3-T59N-R21W. From Linneus, go west on Hwy B about 3 miles to Hwy Y, then north on Hwy Y about 6 miles. Turn left (west) on a gravel road; cemetery is on the south edge of the road 30 yards from the blacktop.
Pleasant View Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S2-T58N-R19W. From St. Catharine, go east on Hwy 11 until the highway turns north; then continue north about 4 1/2 miles until the highway curves right to the east. At this point, a gravel road continues north; take this gravel road. The cemetery is about 300 yards down the road on the left (west) side.
Prather Cemetery* Located in SE corner S12-T60N-R21W. Go west from Browning on Hwy MM from Hwy 5 about 1 mile; turn south on gravel road. Continue south about 1/2 mile, then west about 0.6 mile to cemetery. Cemetery on north side of road clearly marked by archway gate.
Price Cemetery* Located in NW 1/4 S15-T60N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy 129 and Hwy HH, south of Winigan, go south on Hwy HH about 1/4 mile; cemetery will be on left (east) side of road.
Pulliam Cemetery* Also known as Gash Cemetery
Located in SW 1/4 S26-T59N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy C, north of Brookfield, go south on Hwy 11 2 1/2 miles then turn right (west) on a gravel road. Go west 1/2 mile then turn south at the intersection. Go south 1/4 mile to farm home. Drive thru farm yard (with permission) and follow dirt lane. Stay left at intersection and pass a small pond and tin barn; continue on dirt lane about 1/4 mile to a fence line. Cemetery is on the right (west) side of lane and south of the fence.
Purdin Cemetery* Located in Northeast corner, S7-T59N-R10W. Cemetery is about 1/8 mile west of Hwy 5, at the north edge of Purdin; easily visible from highway.
Putman Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S10-T60N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy O and Hwy OO at North Salem, go west on Hwy O about 1 1/4 miles to top of first ridge west of West Yellow Creek. Park in private drive south of highway and walk south past barn and pens then veer to southwest, passing a pond on the east, to fence line. Cemetery is 300 yards south of highway marked by several small trees.
Ray Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S23-T59N-R18W. From New Boston, go south on Hwy 129 about 2 miles to the 2nd gravel road west. Go west past a home; cemetery is on a ridge in a patch of timber about 1/2 mile southwest of the house (1/4 mile south of the gravel road).
Ridings Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S33-T58N-R20W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy FF (west of Brookfield), go north on Hwy FF across railroad tracks about 1 mile to second gravel road on the left. Turn left on gravel road and go about 1/2 mile; cemetery is about 1500 feet north of the road and just west of n-s fence line.
Rose Hill Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S7-T57N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy 36 in Brookfield, go south on Hwy 11 to eastbound outer road; turn left (east) and follow outer road to cemetery.
Roselawn Cemetery – see Mt. Olivet Cemetery  
Saint Bonaventure Cemetery* Located in NW 1/4 S31-T57N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy JJ (Lake Street) and Kansas Avenue in Marceline, go west about 1/4 mile past city limit; cemetery is on the left (south) side of road adjacent to a gravel road going south.
Saint Michael´s Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S7-T57N-R19W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy 36 in Brookfield, go south on Hwy 11 to eastbound outer road; turn left (east) and follow outer road past Rose Hill Cemetery, then south to cemetery on right (west) side of road.
Sensentaffer Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S9-T57N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy 5 at Laclede, go south on Hwy 139 for 1 mile then turn left (east) on a gravel road. Go east about 1 3/4 mile; cemetery is 400 yards north of road. A private drive going to a farm house in the area will lead to the cemetery.
Sights Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S5-T57N-R18W. This cemetery is shown on the Linn County Road Map published by the State of Missouri, but is reported to have been destroyed by bulldozing; no trace of the cemetery or stones has been found.
Smith Cemetery* Located in SW 1/4 S23-T60N-R22W. From Meadville, go north on Hwy 139 about 13 miles to Hwy DD; then go north on Hwy DD about 1 mile to a gravel road going west. Go west on gravel road about 1/3 miles; cemetery is 1/4 mile north of the road. Best to continue west a short way and go thru a barnyard then angle northeast to cemetery.
Snyder/Bigger Cemetery* Located in SE 1/4 S30-T58N-R20W. From Laclede, go north on Hwy 5 about 1 mile then turn left (west) on a gravel road. Go west about 3/8 mile; cemetery is about 100 yards north of the road (north and east of a shop building).
Southerland Cemetery*  
South Swedish Cemetery Also known as Mission Covenant Church.
Located in NW 1/4 S1-T58N-R18W. From Bucklin, go north on Hwy 129 about 5 1/2 miles, about 1 mile past a power substation on the right (east) side of road. Go go second gravel road to the west past the substation. Go west on this gravel road 1/4 mile, then turn north and go about 0.6 miles; church and cemetery are on top of the ridge on the east side of the road.
Sportsman Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S12-T57N-R19W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy 5 north of Marceline, go west on Hwy 36 for 2 miles; then turn north on a gravel road. Go north about 3/4 mile to a barn and concrete silage pit. Follow the fence between the barn and silage pit about 250 yards to cemetery (about 50 yards past end of fence).
Stains Cemetery* Located in SW 1/4 S27-T57N-R19W. From Marceline, go west on Hwy JJ to 90 degree left turn about 1 1/2 miles past city limit. Continue west on a gravel road about 1 1/2 miles to a low water bridge over Yellow Creek. Continue past bridge until road turns left. From here, the cemetery is about 400 yards northeast of road in a clump of trees.
Stein Burying Ground Located in S36-T57N-R18W. From Marceline, go south on Hwy 5 to city limit, then east on a gravel road about 3 3/4 miles to another gravel road going north. Go north on this road about 1/4 mile, then turn east. Continue east until this road turns north, but continue east here. Cemetery is about 300-350 yards east of the gravel road.
Strawberry West Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S31-T59N-R21W. From intersection of Hwy 139 and Hwy B north of Meadville, go east on Hwy B 1 mile to a gravel road going north. Go north on the gravel road about 3/4 mile; cemetery is about 25 yards west of the road.
Stufflebean-Baker Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S19-T60N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy PP, go north on Hwy PP about 2 1/2 miles, then go west on a gravel road about 1/2 mile, then turn north. Go north about 0.6 mile; cemetery is west of road on a ridge a few yards from road.
Swetnam Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S16-T59N-R18W. This cemetery was supposed to be just south of the road and stones in the fenceline. Stones or plot could not be found; a report was that the stones had been removed to Wyandotte Cemetery.
Swinford Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S2-T59N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy M and Hwy P north of Brookfield, go west then north on Hwy P about 4 miles to the curve where the highway turns west; the cemetery site is 50 yards west of the road. The cemetery has been destroyed.
Switzer Chapel Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S5-T58N-R18W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy U, north of Marceline, go north on Hwy U about 7 miles. Here the road bends to the east; go past the bend about 3/4 mile (the road again bends east). At this second bend, a gravel drive goes north. Follow this land about 0.7 mile, going north at the split in the road; cemetery is on the left (west) side of the road about 100-150 yards north of the split.
Thayer Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S5-T57N-R18W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy U, north of Marceline, go north on Hwy U about 1 1/2 miles to a gravel road going east near the bottom of a hill. Park on gravel road and walk uphill south on Hwy U about 60-70 yards, then walk west up over the hill; cemetery is on west slope of the hill just 50 yards from Hwy U.
Thorne Cemetery Located in S29-T59N-R20W. From Linneus, go north on Hwy 5 about 2 miles to gravel road east. Go east on gravel road about 0.7 mile to where road turns north. Cemetery is about 150 yards east along fence line from this point.
United BrethernCemetery Also known as Pleasant Grove Methodist ChurchCemetery. Located in SW 1/4 S36-T60N-R20W. From intersection of Hwy C and Hwy KK (about 2 miles east of Purdin), go east on hwy C about 1 mile then turn left (north) on a gravel road; go north about 1 mile, then east about 1/4 mile, then north 1/4 mile, then back east. Cemetery and church are on the left (north) side of road.
Venable Cemetery Located somewhere around Eversonville in T59N-R22W
Ware Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 & SE 1/4 S28-T59N-R20W. From Linneus, go east on Hwy P from intersection of Hwy 5 about 2 1/4 miles to a gravel road going north. Go north 1 1/2 miles, then turn right (east). Go east 1/2 mile where road turns north again. Go south down a lane about 0.2 mile; cemetery is about 150 yards east with several trees in it.
Watkin Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S24-T58N-R21W. From Linneus, go south on Hwy 5 about 2 miles to a gravel road going west. Go west about 1 mile then turn left (south) on another gravel road. Go south about 0.6 mile to a private drive on the right (west) side of the road. The drive leads to a farm house; the single tombstone is in the back yard under pine trees about 100 yards west of the road.
Wesley Chapel Cemetery Located in NW 1/4 S32-T60N-R20W. Go north from Purdin on Hwy 5 about 0.2 mile to a gravel road also going north. Stay on gravel road to left about 1.6 miles then turn right (east). Go about 1/2 mile to cemetery 150 yards south of road.
West Liberty Cemetery Located in SW 1/4 S25-T59N-R21W. From Linneus, go north on Hwy 5 about 1 1/2 mile to first gravel road west. Go west on gravel road about 1 1/4 mile then turn south at a ´T´ intersection. Go south about 1/2 mile; cemetery is 250 yards west of the road just north of the line fence.
Worley Cemetery* Located in SE corner S2-T60N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy 11 and Hwy 129, go north on Hwy 11 about 1 mile to intersection with a gravel road on the left. Turn left and go about 75 yards to another ´T´ intersection; turn left and go another 75 yards; cemetery is on the left in a wooded area.
Wright Cemetery Located in SE 1/4 S21-T57N-R18W. From intersection of Hwy WW and Hwy ZZ east of Marceline, go north on a gravel road 1 mile, then turn left (west). Go west about 3/4 mile – the road dead-ends at a reservoir. Follow the old reservoir road on foot north about 750 yards; cemetery is east of old road.
Wyandotte Cemetery Located in NE 1/4 S29-T58N-R18W and NW 1/4 S28-T58N-R18W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy U, north of Marceline, go north on Hwy U about 4 miles to a gravel road going east. Go east about 1/2 mile; cemetery is on the north side of the road surrounding the Wyandotte Church.
Wyant Cemetery* Located in SW 1/4 S20-T59N-R18W. From St. Catharine, go north on Hwy 11 about 6 1/4 miles to a gravel road going east (1st road north of ´S´ in highway). Go east about 1 1/2 miles, then turn north on a gravel road about 1/2 mile, then east 1/2 mile, then north again 0.6 to 0.7 mile; cemetery is on a ridge 75-100 yards east of the road in a pasture.
Yount Cemetery Located in Se 1/4 S21-T58N-R20W. From the intersection of Hwy 36 and Hwy FF (west of Brookfield), go north on Hwy FF about 3 1/4 miles to a gravel road going west. Go west for about 0.6 mile; cemetery is on the right (north) side of the road.

Productive & Organized at Work

ZipRecruiter author Kaila Kea offers these five tips to be productive and organized at work.

It is no secret that being productive and organized at work leads to positive professional outcomes. Being organized and productive can help you feel less stress and greater satisfaction at work. Increased efficiency and better communication are just two of the positive side effects of employing organization skills in the workplace.

While you must find a system that works for you, there are some strategies that can help anyone become more organized and productive.

We have put together 5 top organization skills that will enable you to increase efficiency, maximize your workspace, effectively use information, and employ timely communication skills.

  1. Use Your Time Wisely.

The importance of time management cannot be overstated. Time is the one resource that cannot be replenished, so it is best to use it wisely.

Improve your time management by setting reminders. Technology makes setting reminders easier than ever! Between phone alarms, calendar reminders, and smartwatch cues, we can effectively manage our time. In addition to this, note and prioritize your goals, eliminate distractions, and say “no” when necessary.

Read more about the importance of time management here.

  1. Write it Down.

Writing notes is one of the best ways to be organized and productive. Mueller and Oppenheimer’s classic study indicated that writing requires the processing and rephrasing of information, which makes a lasting impression on the notetaker’s memory. This results in an increased ability to recall what is required of you to be productive for the day.

Keep a calendar, planner, notebook, or set of post-it notes along with plenty of writing utensils in your workspace. When an important commitment is brought to your attention, you will have what you need to record it. Keep notes that are brief, detailed, and legible to help you stay organized.

  1. Work Ahead of Schedule.  

Why work up to the deadline when you can work ahead of schedule? Use this form of time management to set gradual deadlines that are at least three to five days earlier than the official deadline. This aids in being more productive and avoids last-minute communication with colleagues about tasks that require immediate attention.

If you need to respond to pending inquiries in your inbox by close of business, set your deadline just before lunch. Or, if you must submit your contribution to a team project by Friday, set your planning tools to remind you to meet gradual deadlines then aim to submit it a day early. The key to getting better at working ahead of schedule is viewing your final deadline as a last resort. Instead of working up until the very last minute, work toward an earlier deadline that gives you space to walk away from your work and return to it later to apply finishing touches.

  1. Keep a Clear Workspace.

The space in which you work affects how you work. Working in an orderly space will help you reduce distraction and keep a clear head and keep track of all your notes and calendars. You can extend this idea to your digital workspace. Just a physical files on your desk will hinder your productivity, so will stray files on your computer desktop or having tabs open that you don’t need to look at. Taking a little time each day to do some basic housekeeping will help you stay organized, productive, and on task.

  1. Customize Your Approach.

For maximum efficiency, customize your approach to work for you and the way you operate. Some people organize assignments according to the order in which they are due while others tackle tasks in order of difficulty.

To customize your approach, consider the ways you work best一do you fare better with visuals, words, or a combination of both? Perhaps you are more audial and would benefit from leaving voice notes for yourself or listening to soothing sounds while you work. You can do some trial and error and be mindful of what helps you work best.


Written by Kaila Kea.

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Tidiness Tips

  1. Make your bed, hang up your clothes, shut closet door, drawers, straighten rug
  2. If you take it out, put it away – where it belongs!
  3. If you make a mess – clean it up.
  4. When you get out of the car – take all your stuff and rubbish with you.
  5. Deal with paper that comes into your house daily – mostly rubbish usually – which means deep six it immediately – no piling.
  6. Wash the dishes, let dry, put them away along with the drain rack.  Clean and shine sink/faucet/handles.
  7. Clear and wipe counters, sinks, back splash, faucets every day.  Just takes a moment – just do it.
  8. Keep laundry current – when hamper is full – wash the clothes, dry or hang them to dry.  Fold them and put away.  Consider washing a load everyday.
  9. Throw away things that don’t work, give away or sell things you don’t use.
  10. Some tasks simply take time and need doing at least once a week.  Cleaning showers, bathtubs, toilets, vacuuming or washing floors, dusting ceilings, washing walls, windows, sills.  Some prefer scheduling the same time each week to do all or choose one or more to do each day until it’s all done.
  11. Consider carefully whether or not you need more storage units or shelves vs just getting rid of extra stuff.  Less stuff; less to clean.

 

Benefits:

  1. Company can drop in and you won’t be embarrassed or feel the need to apologise for filth.
  2. Having to unload papers and junk from a chair to allow a guest to be seated or clearing papers from the dining table or washing it off before serving puts your guests at odds with feeling welcome – already they feel guilty for causing you extra work on their behalf.
  3. Clean and organised eliminates the stress caused by a chaotic environment.
  4. Putting things away saves time in looking for ‘lost’ items.  “A place for everything and everything in its place.”
  5. Cleaning and keeping things clean often increases its useful life in addition to it looking nice during its life in your home or property.
  6. Being clutter free and organised saves time/money/health.

 

IMG-3891
I’m not a fan of buying shelving or other storage units – usually that just means i’ve got too much stuff.  However, when renovating our old house and enduring NO shelves in the lower cupboards, after 3 years, i finally relented to purchasing this nice inexpensive unit and now, finding stuff is oh such joy!  This is actually called a 2-tier shoe rack, but works perfectly in this space for my needs.  

What are your tips for keeping your house, job, and life neat and tidy?  What are your challenges?

Cheers!

tauna

 

Faith, Family, Farm

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