Category Archives: Repairs & Maintenance

Land Considerations

As i get older, i’m more aware of how much time and hard work a piece of property can be.  Many years ago, my grandpa gave me a 160 acre piece of his land and i now realize that he was about my age now when he gave it.  I was much younger and was thrilled, but now i can see that he was probably tired of managing and fixing all its problems.  In fact, it is only about the east 80 acres of the farm i now have that incurs 80% of the work i do on the 520 acres i now own/manage.  (it is a sad reflection of our time that in north Missouri that is no where near enough property to make a living on).  At the same time, it’s the corner of that piece that is the best for working and loading out livestock.  (interestingly, my daughter, at about age 11 made the comment, ‘i don’t like this farm, it is too much work!”)

Truth be told, if it was possible for me to control the land to the north of me and to the south, i could all but eliminate the massive erosion and washing problems which cause my little piece to be so much work.  But i don’t, so difficult repairs are recurring.  Controlling the ‘heads’ of the water by building ponds or dams would practically stop all but the worst rain events which cause such destruction.  The biggest help would be to seed down the hills that are being farmed every year.  There are no roots to hold any soil in place and increase water infiltration on acres and acres of slope.

So, a point i’m trying to make is – look to your future self when purchasing a property – is this property you are considering fixable?  or will it be constant work?  We actually looked at a property last year that was adjoining and for sale, but with all it’s deep ditches and no control of the head, it would be more work than what we wanted to take on now at retirement age.  It is FAR too much asking price anyway.  (It’s still for sale)

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The water rushes through this gap so high and fast that there is brush and sometimes huge logs on top of the sealed road you see in this photo.  This time, there are only a few small pieces on the road, my fence caught most of the trash.  The fence is laid over so much, that i’ll actually take the wires off the two posts you see, pull the posts and reset them on the inside of the trash and it will still be in line with the existing fence.
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For fun, i found this map which shows the watershed area through which this one water gap i’m repairing all the runoff water passes through.  I measured the area and it encompasses 560 acres of surface land area.  When we get gully washers, which do come at least 3 times a year, that’s a lot of water rushing down Lick Branch – no wonder my fence gets washed out every time.

Replacing Solar Panel Fuse

My fences are completely dead now with the lack of a tiny fuse.  These photos are from the last time it needed changing.  I’m going to ask the fellow who installed this if we can turn that panel upside down so that the fuse box is lower to the ground.  This is just ridiculous how much work it is and equipment needed to change a fuse!

 

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Helpful Tools!

Saw a small ad in Stockman Grassfarmer recently for an adaptive full flow valve which can be attached to a low flow valve and float assembly.  I was super excited about this and it being a Jobe product, there was a good chance it would be a quality product.

So i hopped on the internet to find one and, although Valley Vet Supply had it for a good price,  i didn’t need any other supplies to meet the $75 minimum for free shipping (we use this good company regularly).  Then i found one on Ebay for a dollar less and Free shipping!  Seems like it was direct from the importer.  Jobe is a New Zealand company.

I only bought one because i wanted to see if it would actually work, then i may buy another.  I hesitated because these puppies are not cheap at $43.65 a pop.

Yesterday, i installed it on a tank here close to the house so i could keep an eye on it in case of failure, but it worked perfectly!  The flow is nearly that of just an open hose with the excellent pressure my husband built into the system which pumps from a distant pond.

Looking forward to seeing how long this will last.

It’s Called  Tranz Former by Jobe Valves.

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Pawls are good Pals!

Pawls usually need replacing after several years of hard use.  Buy them from Kencove Fence Supplies.

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All that is needed to replace the broken pawl with a new one are a Phillips screwdriver and a 10 mm wrench.
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This little piece of plastic will save a lot of frustration and time by effectively holding the metal catch up when unrolling polybraid.  
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With the new pawl installed, the metal catch is securely out of the way to keep it from stopping the reel from unrolling.

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna

Fences, Water tanks, and Corrals

What do farmers and ranchers do when they aren’t directly handling their stock?  To be sure maintenance of the infrastructure is at the top of the list!  Today was another day of such for me.  Dallas went with me, so with his help, we were able to accomplish more than twice what I can accomplish alone in the same amount of time.  Today was drizzly and muddy, but the temperature was mid-50s so that’s a good day to work outside.

It takes at least an hour to gather the materials and tools, plus loading a small bit of hay from the hayloft I’m cleaning out on the Buckman farm to haul up to my cows, fuel up, and head north.  The drive is about 35 minutes when the weather is good.  

We had a stretch of hi-tensile electric wire to repair which had been hit by deer and the wire had pulled through a gripple rendering this part of interior paddock fence completely useless.  So, the end post brace was reset and the wires reattached as well as patching the broken part.  All wires restretched with a gripple tensioning tool, then with the gate shut, electricity flowed freely to make the fence ‘hot.’

One water tank had lost its plug, so a couple days ago, I had to get creative and twisted a plug of hay and forced it through the hole.  Incredibly, this worked perfectly!  Absolutely no water came through.  However, I did replace the hay with the proper plug today.

It was still not quite dark, so we unloaded the polywire reel and some step in posts at the Bowyer barn (i’ll set them up next trip up), then went round the block (Cotton Road is FAR too muddy right now) to tie 2 inch by 3 inch welded wire 3 foot fence to four gates in the corral in preparation for mustering the sheep (hopefully tomorrow – weather permitting) and sorting off the ewe lambs I don’t want to get bred.

Even though it was all but dark, I wanted to get more steel posts pulled up and old barbed wire rolled up from around the old horse pond (small pond dug by horses way back in the old days).  So we managed about 7 posts and one strip of wire before the wind shifted and the rain started in serious and it was just flat out dark, dark, dark.   It’s a 35-40 minute drive home in the Gator, so we headed out.