Category Archives: Fauna

Prairie State Park

Before i lay into the management of the park, let me be clear that i haven’t a clue as to the constraints and regulations a state park must adhere to. Also, don’t hesitate to visit the park – winter is certainly not its most beautiful season. I did see about a dozen bison.

Covid stuff has made doing stuff a bit awkward – i didn’t see a soul at this park – rangers or visitors. The Prairie State Park visitor’s center was closed, so i back tracked to the camping area and with a bit of driving around, discovered an outdoor privy. It was gross, but didn’t gag me – maybe because i was desperate.

Anyway, that relieved, I drove back towards the visitor’s center – there was one long trail near the privy, but it was too late in the day for me to conquer it. I found one much shorter which was only a path through a burnt out field of native prairie – or what is accepted as native prairie.

Let me admit my bias up front; for regular pasture/field/timber management, i think fire is stupid. It destroys the micro organisms, small critters, and sends amazing amounts of carbon into the atmosphere – not to mention it is dangerous and takes careful management so that the fire doesn’t get away. Typically, it does the exact opposite of what it is touted to accomplish.

There, having said that, fire can be a necessary tool for emergency renovation if we haven’t managed a parcel and now need to jump start healing – a one time deal – if other practices have been exhausted.

As i drove around the park, it appeared to have perhaps half of the property burnt to the ground. I almost didn’t take the time to make this hike, but so glad i did. This was the first time, i’ve explored, examined, encountered the devastating effects of fire on pasture/range/prairie.

Path of the Scorched Earth – would have made a better title.
The grasses are completely burnt, leaving not only no cover, but scorched soil. Any nutrients and saliva provided by bison are burnt up as well. Hopefully, the plants were allowed to grow enough to develop deep root systems to facilitate fast growth in the next growing season.
Oodles and myriads of small rodents and other critters skeletons and bones completely stripped of any hide or sinew. Either these animals were eaten or died a very long time ago or they were caught in the fire.
Pieces of a turtle shell. No one can know for sure the demise of the turtle. We have so few box turtles in north Missouri, i hate to see their destruction. We do have a lot of snapping turtles though, which we could do without – terribly hard on ducklings and goslings.
Woody sprouts thick and getting out of control without proper grazing by bison. These are a result of very low density grazing which allows selective grazing. Once these tree sprouts, thorny vines, etc get started, it’s very difficult to restore the prairie without mowing or chemicals. Fire does not hurt them.
People of the Sky trail – more charred earth – it was getting cold and i’ve learnt a lot by walking on charred pastures.

Wildlife Walkabout – Trumpeter Swan

Finally getting back to my idea of posting about area flora and fauna with this week’s contribution being the Trumpeter Swan.  These past several trips to my farm – Tannachton Farm – has been highlighted by these graceful and seldom sighted birds.

Missouri Department of Conservation

TRUMPETER SWANS BRING GRACE TO WINTER WATERS

Don’t miss this video from Missouri Department of Conservation:

Voice of the Trumpeter Swan in the Wild

Read up on Trumpeter Swans in this Field Guide published online by the Missouri Department of Conservation.

Trumpeter Swans are a protected species and are not to be hunted since efforts are still underway to established greater numbers of this beautiful bird.

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Killdeer Mama!

This time of year, the killdeer are laying eggs and setting on them.  Officially a shorebird (plover), but often found in short pastures and especially along gravel drives on dry ground.  The wary mommas will lead predators away from the nest by running, then acting as if she is injured.

 

 

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Killdeer are masters of camouflage, but thankfully i found this nest or we would have run over it with the pickups and trailers whilst unloading and loading herd bulls last week.

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Killdeer mama guarding her nest seen just above her to the right.

 

Killdeer nest camouflaged
Killdeer nest well camouflaged.

Kildeer (2)

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Mama with one of four babies.