Tag Archives: Australia

Corned Beef & Corn on the Cob

Tough to top this delicious lunch for today!

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Corned Beef

Sandra Best from her days of preparing food for the sheep shearing crew in Longreach, Queensland, Australia

INGREDIENTS: 

  • 5 lb rolled rump roast
  • 4 1/2 quarts of water
  • 2 lbs coarse salt

DIRECTIONS: 

Heat water to dissolve salt then let cool completely. Stab thawed roast about 60 times with a long-tined meat fork. Pour salt water into a #2 ceramic crock and submerge roast into it. Weight down the roast with a brick or whatever. Place crock in a cool place and cover with kitchen towel. Let sit for 9 days. (I found some recipes, which called for turning the roast everyday, but we forgot to do that and it worked fine).

To cook:

Rinse roast, then place in a stockpot filled with enough water to cover roast 1 inch. Bring to slow boil, then pour off water, rinse out pot and refill with enough water to cover roast 1 inch. While water is heating add 2 tablespoons brown sugar, two bay leaves, 1 onion, quartered, 2 teaspoons nutmeg, and 1/4-cup vinegar. Cover and bring to slow boil, then simmer until meat falls off of a fork or skewer. (about 3 hours).

Serve with mashed potatoes or for an easy potluck, break up the meat and stir into potatoes and serve in a crock pot. Or let cool and slice off for sandwiches to take to work.

Hanging in the Wind!

One of my best investments is the Hills Drymaster 42 rotary clothesline I purchased 10 years ago after admiring them in all the backyards of Australia. Cost about the same (less now) as an electric dryer, but we can only use it about 6-8 months of the year, but line dried clothing and sheets are such treats.  Find them at Breeze Dryer.
Last May (2014) Nathan and Allen re-installed my Hills rotary clothesline. SO glad for that. The pole is set in concrete, but they had dug the chunk of concrete which contained the receiving end for the pole from the lawn of the Lamme house, then hand dug a hole by the northeast corner of the Young farm house (formerly Powell’s Country Guest House) where we now live. I purchased this Hill’s rotary clothesline after our return from Australia in March of 2005 because EVERYONE had them over there and they are so efficient. However, the heavy duty ones used there were not available in the US, so I purchased this lighter duty one from an outfit in Canada via paypal – that was the first time I’d used Paypal. (Funny, the things our minds remember, eh?) In only a couple of years, the small plastic snap which held the ‘arms’ up and out broke and for years, I just had a gnarly piece of wire holding it up, albeit not tightly. Dallas helped me drill a hole underneath the collar and through the pole, so I could insert a 5/16ths by 2 ¼ inch PTO locking pin. Should have done this years ago. Works like new now!

I was dumping about 12 gallons of water a day from our basement dehumidifier largely because of running the dryer so much (it simply vents into the basement) and could still not get the humidity level below 55%. Works fine in the winter since we need the humidity, but springtime and summertime humidity can quickly overwhelm a basement and coats and valuables start moulding because of high humidity! With the rotary clothesline up, now I hang out all the clothes and rarely run the dryer and, as long as we keep the dehumidifier running, the humidity level is dropping already to about 43% – hope to level off about 37%.

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The Drymaster 42 is no longer made, but there are newer models now and they can be purchased in the US. I had to purchase mine out of Canada. It is not the heavy duty model found in Australia, but it serves the purpose well. I see now that the prices have come down which is a pleasant surprise!

The little orange latch broke years ago so I repaired it by drilling a hole through the post and then using this pin to hold the rotary clothesline in the upright position.
The little orange latch broke years ago so I repaired it by drilling a hole through the post and then using this pin to hold the rotary clothesline in the upright position.
Stormy or super windy weather is a good time to fold it up.  This can really get to spinning if the wind is whipping around.
Stormy or super windy weather is a good time to fold it up. This can really get to spinning if the wind is whipping around.

Just discovered that today is National Hanging Out Day.  Way too windy, rainy, and stormy here, but maybe later this week!

Cheers!

tauna