Tag Archives: beef

Beef Short Ribs and Yellow Fat

Health Benefits of Grassfed Food stuffs

Buggers, my photo doesn’t properly show just how yellow the fat is from these super tender grass finished beef short ribs.  I buy grassfed butter from our friends, but it’s extremely expensive, so when i can, i use our home grown beef fat for cooking and flavouring.

Our cattle are fully finished on pasture only – no grain ever – which allows the fat to be high in vitamin E and betacarotenes, thus giving its yellow colour.

Absolutely tasty.  The broth will be frozen up for soup making.

Keep hydrated out there!

tauna

 

Sabbath Day Devotion – Kit Pharo

Sabbath Day Devotion

April 8, 2017

Was Jesus a Vegetarian?

I had someone ask me if Jesus was a vegetarian.   That is a question I have never thought much about.   Apparently there are some in the vegan world promoting this concept.
Answer: Jesus was not a vegetarian.   The Bible records Jesus eating fish in Luke 24:42-43.   In Luke 22:7-15, we are told that Jesus ate the Passover meal with his disciples.   This meal included the Passover lamb.

I would like to say that Jesus was a big beef eater, but I cannot find any scriptures to support that way of thinking.   However, when Jesus tells the parable of the prodigal son in Luke 15:11-32, he said the “father killed the fattened calf” to celebrate the return of his son.

After the flood, God gave mankind permission to eat meat (Genesis 9:1-3).   God has never rescinded this permission.

With that said… there is nothing wrong with a Christian being a vegetarian.   The Bible does not command us to eat meat.   The Bible does say, though, that we should not force our convictions about this issue on other people or judge them by what they eat or do not eat (Romans 14:1-3).

Don’t just GO to church; BE the Church

Kit Pharo

Pharo Cattle Company

Cheyenne Wells, CO

Phone: 1-800-311-0995

Email: Kit@PharoCattle.com

Website: www.PharoCattle.com

 

Both my guys are sick!

Well, buggers, both my husband and son are sick with the croupy head and coughing junk.  Dallas has had it for nearly 10 days, my husband got hit yesterday, but woke up with it already down in his lungs – he sounds bad.  If he feels bad in the morning, he’s gonna go ahead and make a doctor appointment.

Since we are nearly out of beef in the freezer and completely out of bones, I stole the big bones that were intended for the dog that i had the butcher cut from our own grass finished cow to make broth! (thankfully, i was able to get a cow booked in to the butcher on the 6th of February).

The bones are kind of big, but thankfully, they still fit in the pot.  I pack the bones in the pot and fill to 2 inches to the top of the pot.  Bring to a boil, but watch it or it will boil over and make a mess, then turn it down and let slow boil for 3-4 hours.

With tongs, carefully lift out all the bones.  I then set the entire pot outside to cool so the saturated fat will float to the top and solidify.  Yes, a little fat is good, but these bones will make a lot of fat, it’s really overwhelming in our opinion.  Once solidified, i remove it from the top and put into a tub with lid for later use.

Warm the remaining liquid.  Now, you can just eat it this way for clear broth – maybe add some salt or pepper OR what i did tonight, was to the 1 gallon of broth is one large onion chopped and sauteed in some of the beef fat, 1/2 cup dried parsley, 1/4 cup dried sage, 2 tablespoons celery salt, and about 3 cups of sliced carrots.  Slow boil until carrots are softened to however you like them, maybe 20-30 minutes.  Ready to serve.

Keep well!

tauna

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King’s Processing does a fabulous job of getting all the bits of beef off the bones, so the meat yield is quite high. However, you can see there are some bits on this that may be available after it’s cooked.
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Yup, after cooking and the meat is softened, i was able to pick up about 1 cup of beef bits. Always let those bones cool off completely before handling; they are hot and hold heat for a very long time.
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Use a couple tablespoons or so of the hardened beef fat to saute chopped onions that will be added back to the broth once softened.

Beef Jerky

Lots of recipes, variations, etc, but here’s our favourite.

While still partially frozen, slice trimmed strip steak in 1/4 inch strips.  Put those trimmings in a small pot and later add enough water to cover, bring to boil, then reduce heat to simmer for an hour or two.  After water has cooled, pinch off any meat bits and throw fat strips to the dog or cat if you don’t like them (the fat not the dog/cat). This is great beef broth for veggie soup base.

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Put lean strips into a larg bowl or heavy plastic bag that doesn’t leak when closed.  After the strips have fully thawed (may need to pour off more blood at this point), then prepare the seasonings and pour into meat.  Stir or massage  until strips are coated in the seasoning mix.  Cover bowl or bag and place in frig for 24 hours.  You may want to place the bag in a deep dish or something, just in case it leaks a bit.  Stir or massage meat strips a couple times during that 24 your period, just to mix it up a bit with the seasonings.  This recipe can accommodate 2-4 lbs of meat.

Seasoning Ingredients:

  1. 4 oz liquid smoke (i use Wright’s)
  2. 1/2 cup Bragg’s Liquid Aminos
  3. 1 tsp Real or sea salt
  4. 3 tsp onion powder
  5. 1 tsp black pepper
  6. 1 tsp garlic powder
  7. 1 tsp cumin
  8. 1 tsp cayenne pepper (optional, i don’t use it – my husband is allergic – and it makes the mix pretty ‘hot’ (picante)

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After 24 or so hours marinating, preheat oven to 160°-175°F and place strips in a single layer on a cooke sheet that has a raised edge so the liquid seasonings don’t run off the pan.  I scrunch them in close together because i don’t want any more pans to wash than i have to.  Plus the meat will shrink considerably whilst drying.  However, today, i’m going to try lining them with parchment paper and see if that affects drying time.  Definitely should make cleanup a LOT easier.  Actually, i think i’ll try a side by side test of just placing parchment paper directly on oven rack and one on the tray.  Hmm – will let you know.  But for sure i’m not going to place the strips directly on the oven rack as many recipes will say to do – that’s far too big a mess to clean those racks!

Now the key is to dry them to the point your family likes.  The thicker slices take a little longer, thinner ones less.  Do you like jerky crispy?  then cook it a bit longer, chewy, a bit less.  So, just check it after a couple hours, then every hour or so.  One thing i’ve discovered is that the jerky will dry out a bit more after you removed from the oven, so allow for that before leaving it in the oven too long.  If the meat is completely dried, then you can likely store it at room temperature – no problem.  We typically like ours with a bit of moisture so it’s more chewy, this requires refrigeration.

I’ll update this blog entry with the results of my drying test

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna

Update – I decided to line my stone pans with aluminum foil.  No doubt this causes longer cooking time for the jerky (6-7 hours at 170°F).  But cleanup was so easy.

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4 lbs of sliced strip steak, marinated and ready to slow cook for jerky.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hamburger Soup

Sunny, but frosty out this morning and although we are expecting a high of 45F, warm soup will feel mighty good today.

Hamburger Soup

1 lbs grass-finished ground beef (browned)

1 cup sliced carrots

1/2 chopped onion

2 cups diced tomatoes

2 cups water or soup stock

1 cup diced celery

2 teaspoons salt (if desired)

1 teaspoon black pepper (if desired)

One pot directions:  brown the ground beef in 1 tablespoon olive oil until no longer pink, add all the other ingredients and simmer.  The longer you simmer it, the more the flavours will meld and veggies soften.

Be creative in ingredients – celery substitute could be the leaves off the back of a head of cauliflower or chopped kohlrabi, leeks would work.  Instead of carrots, maybe turnips, swedes, or rutabaga.  I use my own frozen tomatoes from my garden and since i don’t really cook them down, there is plenty of water in with them, therefore i don’t add more water.  Recipes like this are perfect for emptying the frig or freezer.

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The leaves off the back of a head of cauliflower make a LOT of greens for soup!  Add vitamins A and C plus antioxidants to your meal, not the rubbish bin!

Voting for Beef Producers in Missouri

Sign up online at the Missouri Beef Referendum to be able to vote yea or nay in this forced upon us referendum.  The Missouri Beef Industrial Council says they need more money to ‘educate’ people about beef.  Don’t most consumers already know that we have beef available for sale in Missouri?  Honestly, I’m tired of taxes.

Cheers

tauna

Other ways of signing up for a ballot:

phone:  573.751.5633

e-mail: voter.registration@mda.mo.gov

in person: visit your local county USDA FSA office

Missouri Beef Referendum

Buying Beef or Lamb From the Farmer

There are many articles out there addressing this and to be sure, each producer may do things just a bit different, so please don’t take this article as the end all for ‘how to purchase beef from a farmer.’  This is what we do.

Step by step.

  1. If it is important to you, ask questions or visit the producer’s website (if they have one – many don’t,  we are producers not techies or salesmen) about how the animals are handled and raised.

Sample Question:

  1. Are the beeves you sell fully grass finished or grain finished (feedlot) do they receive grain on pasture? If so, is the grain non-GMO?
  2. Do you vaccinate your animals?  Are the animals you sell to me treated with antibiotics, synthetic dewormers, hormonal implants,
  3. Is your farm and animals raised organically?  certified organic (3rd party certification)?, (Certified organic animals/meat must be processed in a certified organic abattoir, all this adds tremendously to the cost of certified organic but doesn’t necessarily mean it’s better than your local producer.)  For example, many of us raise fully grass-fed and finished from conception to consumption, no implants, no synthetic dewormers, no antibiotics, etc, etc.  But, we might treat some brush in the next paddock with weed killer, so no way can that animal be certified organic.  Also, even if our farm and animals could be certified organic, if there isn’t a certified organic butcher shop, the meat cannot be certified organic.  I would have to make a 4 hour one way drive to a certified organic butcher.  Not going to happen.
  4. Why can’t i just ring up and you have a beef available?  Don’t you keep cattle year round?  Yes, we keep cattle year round, but most of us are cow/calf producers and will only finish enough animals to fill orders placed six months or more in advance.  Once an animal is finished, it needs to go to slaughter – every day that it is still on pasture, it is losing money.   Most of our animals are sold as calves through traditional markets, so if you haven’t ordered a beef well in advance, we won’t have saved back enough beeves to finish one for you.  Also, sometimes the weather plays havoc with finishing times as well.  If you want factory finished feedlot beef, you’ll have to go the store.

You may want to visit the farm before making a purchase, but remember, we are producers, not salesmen – if you aren’t serious about making a purchase, please don’t take up too much time.  Be prepared ahead of time with questions.  You may decide after you meet with the farmer and see how he operates, not to purchase, but don’t take up time just out of curiosity.

If you decide to purchase, already have it in your mind how much you want to buy.  For example, a typically grass-finished carcass will weigh 600-700 lbs.  Be sure to ask the producer, his might be bigger or smaller, but armed with that information, you can quickly determine whether you need a whole, half, or quarter carcass AND you can budget for it.  Be prepared that the carcass may be larger than the producer says – we cannot guarantee an exact hanging weight.  We are just not that good.  We can usually get within 50 lbs more or less.  Quarter carcasses are more likely sold as a split side rather than a hind or fore quarter, but ask; some producers sell both ways.  Half and quarter (split side) will be more expensive – Why?  because we have to find another buyer(s).

So, figure out  how much  meat your family will eat in a year or 6 months.  Most of us only offer beeves once or twice a year since it is time consuming to sell directly to the consumer, however, we are happy to do so if you are serious about quality meat for your family – we share that vision with you.

For a rough figuring, say your family eats 2 lbs of beef per day.  A whole beef of 600 lbs carcass will yield about 360 lbs of packaged meat.  If you want enough for a year – buy two beeves.  You must let the producer know at least 3-4 months in advance so he can keep the animal for you on pasture plus have it booked in at the butcher.  Many local butchers shut down for deer season, which means all domestic animals have to be butchered, hung, and out by 1 October.  They won’t take more in until the first of December, so it is critical to let the producer know well in advance if you want any.  Spring time purchases can be just as critical because so many people want to get animals in.

Once you’ve settled on a price (this will vary a LOT), then you may be expected to make a down payment to hold your beef.  This is reasonable.  Kind of like making a down payment on a vacation trip or anything else you’ve spoken for to do in the future.  Most of the time, you will pay the producer for the beef and the butcher for the processing.  Our processor charges 44 cents per pound hanging weight for basic processing and $30 as a kill fee.  But, i will tell you, that he charges less than most places and certainly less than a USDA inspected plant.  If you want extras like burger patties, extra tenderizing, excessive deboning, or other specialties, these will be an additional cost.  Work that out with the butcher.  Your producer will give you the contact information.

Retail Beef Cuts – most butchers are glad to help you with your custom order, but do a bit of study ahead to make best choices.  Also, remember, local butchers aren’t going to be into fancy, exotic cuts, so ask about special cuts, but you may not get exactly what you want.  You’ll also be asked how thick you want steaks cut and how many to a package, what size roasts and what kind.  Deboned or bone-in.  (i personally like a lot of bone – makes a ton of soup stock or treats for your dog, however, i always get my rump roasts deboned because i make corned beef with them).  How many lbs of burger in a package (1 or 2)?  Organ meats?, Suet?  These are just a sampling.

The butcher will tell you when the animal will be taken in to the butcher and it will likely be killed that day.  If you want organ meats, you MUST notify the butcher in advance!  Don’t forget this.  It is not the producers responsibility to tell the butcher how you want your animal custom processed.  If you don’t notify him, it will probably be thrown away, after which it cannot be salvaged.  If you wait until after the calf is delivered to call the butcher, do so as soon as possible.  Don’t make the butcher track you down and keep them waiting on how to process your calf.  This is not polite.

The producer will likely notify you within a day of the weight of the animal and what you own him.  The animal is yours now and has your name on it, pay him promptly!

Once the butcher calls you that the beef (or lamb) is ready for pickup, GO GET IT!  Some butchers may start charging storage if you leave it for long.  Just go get it and pay him for goodness sake.

How Much Freezer Space?  Allow 20 lb per cubic foot.  That’s packing it in there, though, and won’t be handy for sorting and finding what you need.  It will keep better in a chest type freezer kept near 0ºF versus your frig freezer or even a stand up freezer.  A stand up freezer certainly takes less floor space, but the chest type is typically more energy efficient as well.

What breed?  Some breeds are naturally more lean than others, but if it’s in the feedlot on a high grain diet, it’s gonna be fat regardless if it’s Corriente or Angus.  On grass, the genetics of the animal will be more expressed, but by and large, the producer will take the animal to a determined end point.  Grass finished will generally have less cover and internal fat that grain finished.

Hope this helps!  Do some online googling and research – there are loads of info out there.  Don’t assume the producer is producing in such manner that is important to you.  Don’t complain about the price or the lack of availability.  If you think a producer is too expensive, just shop elsewhere – don’t complain about it.