Tag Archives: Chile

Ultimate Glamping

Fundo Panguilemu is just a 20 minute drive from Coyhaique, Chile.  Stepping into your booked yurt is settling into surprisingly luxurious accommodation overlooking the renowned Simpson River – famous for waters rich with trout and perfect for fly fishing.  and quiet.  Peace and quiet with dark skies and stars like diamonds.

Relax and get away from it all, fly fish, go for a hike, sign up for horse trekking, or just enjoy being on a working farm complete with sheep, cattle, chickens, and horses.  Owners José and Elizabeth are dedicated to regenerating their beautiful property to an even higher level of productivity and beauty through proper management of resources and they are happy to share their knowledge with anyone interested in such endeavors.

Follow along on Fundo Panguilemu Facebook page.  There is good reason to plan your Chilean trip around this outstanding experience.

img_7700
Walking towards one of three yurts available for booking.

img_7701img_7703img_7704img_7705img_7706

img_7707
There are two other yurts available.  you can see both here along with the larger one to the left of the photo which is the commons area where meals are provided (kitchen in the silver shed in back)
img_7694
Your hosts, José and Elizabeth.

 

The view from one of the yurts.

Across Country-Across the Borders

After a great supper followed by a good night’s sleep and enjoying a delicious breakfast next morning, we loaded in our vehicles and headed for the Argentinian border.  Crossing the border here is just part of the experience.  There are two windows and agents to visit with at each border with a driving space of about 7 kilometers between the two.  Getting out, showing and studying paperwork (for vehicles and people), stamping, questions, get loaded back up.  It took our small tour of about ten people, 2 hours to navigate this labyrinth.  The return was somewhat quicker – still a few bumps and luggage needed to be opened but only a cursory examination, more paperwork.  If you don’t have your paperwork in order, chances are good, you will not cross.

But the effort was worth it once we arrived at Numancia Estacion.  First greeted with open warm hospitality and then seated informally for a traditional Argentinian meal.  We did have to wait about an hour for the rain to stop before we began our now shortened farm walk.  Pablo shared details of his Hereford cattle program and Merino sheep scheme.  Then we went out to examine how his 10-year implementation of managed grazing has improved forage quality and yield.

Back to Coyhaique for supper at Hotel El Reloj (awesome) then to Raices Bed and Breakfastjust before they closed the doors for the night!  Finally to be in bed by midnight – scheduled departure is at 5:15a to meet a family business to take us to see the condors on a cliff side.

img_7585
Now this is just a fun group.  On the left front, Mimi Hillenbrand, owner of 777 Bison Ranch in South Dakota, as well as recent owner of a small property in Chili and on the right front, Elizabeth, owner of Fundo Panguilemu.  Photo taken just before supper at Cabañas El Diamante
img_7590
El Diamante’s owner (on the right) is assisting the builder with sprucing up the lovely accommodation and meals served business in Chile.  Stihl chainsaws all over the world!

img_7592img_7596

img_7597
Traditionally roasted lamb.
img_7604
Our host slicing off slabs of tender juicy lamb to serve to his guests.  
img_7624
Pablo explaining his pasture improvement methods.
img_7611
Yes, we got to walk these quiet Hereford pairs into another lot.
img_7621
This and several other Merino rams being graded for quality by an inspector for a composite which tries to improve both wool and meat quality.
img_7593
And back to Chile.