Tag Archives: cow

Late Evening Repair

I completely forgot to check and repair a water gap along Cotton Road which was in a paddock in which i had a young cow get out last time the mob was in this paddock.  She was the only one to get out, thankfully.  Anyway,  despite having driven the 35 minutes and shifting the cows that morning, i had to go back in the evening to check the gap.  Especially since it is adjacent to a cemetery.  I thought i’d just run up in my pickup since it’s faster, but she was out and had taken a friend with her!  Cotton Road is not passable by pick up, so i had to drive back home and get my Gator and some more tools.

The two escapees had drifted into the cemetery instead of continuing west down Cotton Road which made it MUCH easier and quicker to walk them back into the paddock.  Very thankful they were not yet near the tombstones.  I’ve had to pay for repairs in the past and i sure didn’t want another round of that!

Made it back up there before dark and drove a steel t-post and dropped this heavy section of an old hay feeder.  About a week ago, i had cut down these hedge tree sprouts and they were laying nearby, so i dragged them to lay in there as well just to discourage any lounging.  Hedge trees are covered with tiny thorns.

Next day, i needed to check to be certain my repairs had stopped the escapees and thankfully, they had.

 

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Beef Cuts – Lots to Learn!

This guy cuts and talks fast, but you can always back it up to listen again.  Now, remember, your local butcher may not be familiar with all these cuts.  Names for various pieces can vary from region to region and country to country as well.  Also, this guy doesn’t mention ground beef.  Some of that stuff he set aside will likely be ground, but also you can choose any or all of the beef to be ground.  That will make expensive ground beef, but it will also be the highest quality ever!  For more information about buying from your neighbor, read my earlier post.

 

Here are charts from the Beef It’s What’s For Dinner website.  You can even download for printing or magnifying.

 

Beef Retail Cuts Chart 2018
Beef Retail Cuts Chart pdf
BIWFD Foodservice Cuts Poster_FINAL
Beef Foodservice Cut Poster pdf

Parity? Not a chance in Farming

It’s not hard to understand why most young people have no interest in farming as a career.  Low wages, working conditions can be brutal at times (weather related or dangerous), and very low return on investment coupled with high financial risk.  Not a good combination.  The average age of principle operators continues to rise and is now over 58 years old – a time when many in other sectors are planning retirement.  However, the young people who are starting up do seem to work smarter and not harder with the result being a more balanced family/work lifestyle.  Also, mechanisation and better ranching principles continue to make the work more pleasant and give farmers/ranchers the opportunity to expand without working harder or longer hours.  There is hope that agriculture will continue in the US, just with fewer operators and sadly, still supported with off farm income.  There is a joke amongst farmers and ranchers that when asked what they’d do if they won a million dollars, the answer is ‘farm until it’s gone.’

1966

Land cost per acre:  $93/acre  (my Bowyer Place)

Cow Prices:  $20/cwt  (20 cents per pound)

Fed Steer Price:  $25/cwt  (25 cents per pound)

Wages per hour:  $1.25 (minimum wage)

Fuel:  .32/gallon

2018

Land cost per acre:  $2800/acre (similar land sales in Linn County, MO)

Cow Prices:  $63/cwt  (63 cents per pound)

Fed Steer Price:  $115/cwt  ($1.15 per pound)

Wages per hour:  $7.25 (minimum wage)

Fuel: $2.45/gallon

CPI Inflation Calculator to compare:

Land – $93 in 1966 is the same as $725 in 2018 dollars

Cow Prices:  $0.20/lb  in 1966 is the same as $1.56/lb in 2018 dollars

Fed Steers:  $0.25/lb in 1966 is the same as $1.95/lb in 2018 dollars

Wages per hour:  $1.25/hr in 1966 is the same as $9.74/hr in 2018 dollars

Fuel: $0.32/gallon in 1966 is the same as $2.49/gallon in 2018

Both my guys are sick!

Well, buggers, both my husband and son are sick with the croupy head and coughing junk.  Dallas has had it for nearly 10 days, my husband got hit yesterday, but woke up with it already down in his lungs – he sounds bad.  If he feels bad in the morning, he’s gonna go ahead and make a doctor appointment.

Since we are nearly out of beef in the freezer and completely out of bones, I stole the big bones that were intended for the dog that i had the butcher cut from our own grass finished cow to make broth! (thankfully, i was able to get a cow booked in to the butcher on the 6th of February).

The bones are kind of big, but thankfully, they still fit in the pot.  I pack the bones in the pot and fill to 2 inches to the top of the pot.  Bring to a boil, but watch it or it will boil over and make a mess, then turn it down and let slow boil for 3-4 hours.

With tongs, carefully lift out all the bones.  I then set the entire pot outside to cool so the saturated fat will float to the top and solidify.  Yes, a little fat is good, but these bones will make a lot of fat, it’s really overwhelming in our opinion.  Once solidified, i remove it from the top and put into a tub with lid for later use.

Warm the remaining liquid.  Now, you can just eat it this way for clear broth – maybe add some salt or pepper OR what i did tonight, was to the 1 gallon of broth is one large onion chopped and sauteed in some of the beef fat, 1/2 cup dried parsley, 1/4 cup dried sage, 2 tablespoons celery salt, and about 3 cups of sliced carrots.  Slow boil until carrots are softened to however you like them, maybe 20-30 minutes.  Ready to serve.

Keep well!

tauna

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King’s Processing does a fabulous job of getting all the bits of beef off the bones, so the meat yield is quite high. However, you can see there are some bits on this that may be available after it’s cooked.
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Yup, after cooking and the meat is softened, i was able to pick up about 1 cup of beef bits. Always let those bones cool off completely before handling; they are hot and hold heat for a very long time.
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Use a couple tablespoons or so of the hardened beef fat to saute chopped onions that will be added back to the broth once softened.