Tag Archives: cows

Bulls Almost All Pulled

Today was not the most productive and had some frustrations, but Yah is good all the time and no one is hurt or killed.  That’s a good day when mustering in all one’s cows and sorting off 8 bulls.  Granted, only 4 of them are mature 1500-1800 lb bulls, even yearling age bulls can get cranky and hurt you in a heartbeat.

The frustration was only in that it was hot and the cows moved slow like pushing water uphill and that one bull was missing.  Completely, i looked and drove and walked a few ditches, but i knew it was a waste of time because of the heat – no doubt he was hidden down under some brush somewhere.

I did have another small group (24 head) located about a mile from the corral, but i had already set up tapes, so once they finally decided to go to the right corner of their paddock, they moved easily albeit slowly to the corral.  Sorted off that bull and let the cows back out.  The bugger was that i found one of those expensive cows i’d purchased from Ohio in the middle of the field – fat, slick, and dead.  I hate that!  Haven’t a clue what happened.  Wasn’t located to make sense that she was struck by lightning.  Maybe had a heart attack or something, it has been incredibly hot and humid and although she was a young cow, some just can’t hack it.

Called Dallas and he hooked onto the trailer and came up.  Kudos to him for backing the tricky curves to the load out.  Too muddy today to pull in and around, so he had to back all the way from the sealed road and make two sharp turns whilst backing.  Nailed it both times!  He helped me load the first bulls going back to pasture to use next year and i rode with him to make sure all went well.  We went back up for the two bulls that will sell in a bit once they gain a few pounds and maybe the price comes up a bit.

Sorry no photos, but when i’m sorting bulls from cows and calves, then sorting the bulls for each load, then loading, i do not want to be distracted by taking photos.

The good news is that by this time it was starting to cool off and i went to look for the lost bull again and there it was up and headed in the right direction.  Sadly, completely blind, so i eased it in through the gateway towards the cows and shut the gate (single strand bungee electric).  It was getting dark, so i decided to leave the cows in the corral paddock so he could continue towards them by listening and smelling.  Hopefully, in the morning he will be near enough that i can help him find a 16 foot opening.  This is not a handy thing, but i have a plan on how to accomplish moving the cows out of the way to give me plenty of time  to coerce the bull with any opportunity of him getting in with the cows.

But if tomorrow’s plan goes as well as my plans for today, it could be a long day.

Long, slow, hot day, but by and large it went okay – well, except for the expensive dead cow. 😦

Cheers!

tauna

Let Them Eat Weeds!

Kathy Voth, Fred Provenza, and others have long promoted letting cows eat weeds.  There are few weeds that are poisonous and unless cows are starved, they won’t eat them anyway.  Many farmers and ranchers clip or mow pastures and weeds, especially this time of year preparing the paddocks to grow for winter stockpile.

I like to mow pastures – i’ve clipped pastures with a 9-foot sickle bar mower bouncing around (sweating and burning) on a modified wide front end Farmall 460 for years.  The result is a beautifully laid down forage that allows the new growth to pop through and look like a lush lawn.  It’s a good feeling —but i now question its profitability and no longer mow.

Alan Newport recently wrote on an article (Who’s Afraid of Weeds and Brush?) on this very thing.  Greg Judy espouses the benefits of weed grazing in his books and videos.

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Another example of mature forage laid down by decent grazing and trampling pressure.
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This photo is just terrible, but it shows on the left the cows have eaten even Kansas (lanceleaf) ragweed.  The right side of the fence has yet to be grazed.
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Well rested tall grass nicely laid down by trampling and eating.
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If my cows are getting this much grazing out of ragweed, i don’t see much point in mowing it except to lay down those stalks for better microbe use.  But can i afford to own and run a tractor to mow it?  What is left here, the cows will snarf it down once it’s dried down this winter.
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This is a thorny locust tree sprout practically stripped by my cows and calves.  I’ve owned sheep and they do a good job as well, but not any better than my cows.

Who’s afraid of weeds and brush?

In the right system, cattle grazing under ultra-high stock density will eat most “problem” plants and thrive doing it.

Alan Newport | Jun 05, 2019

 

Over the past year I have been grazing beef cattle at high stock density, and at times at ultra-high stock density grazing (UHDG), and I am regularly amazed at the things they eat.

A few examples are: Most of the leaves from buck brush (aka Indian currant), almost all the leaves they can reach from most trees, the top half or more of sericea lespedeza, a fair bit of ironweed and most ragweeds, and at least the top half of goldenrod. In fact, they clean up or at least take part of nearly everything in their environment. And they do it by choice. These plants are sometimes the first things grazed, sometimes the last things grazed, and sometimes taken in the middle of the grazing period. In other words, they are not eaten in desperation or starvation.

I’m sure some of you are asking what qualifies as UHDG. Johann Zietsman, the Namibian rancher and consultant who pioneered UHDG back in the 1990s, says a stock density of 1,000 to 2,000 animals per hectare. If we consider that one hectare is 2.47 acres and that Zietsman and his “disciples” typically run cows that weigh closer to 700 pounds than the 1,500-pound average for modern cattle, this helps us figure out a stock density of maybe 283,000 to 567,000 pounds of stock per acre — or higher. This generally matches my own definition that UHDG starts somewhere around 250,000 pounds per acre, while high stock density or very high stock density probably runs from 60,000 to 250,000 pounds per acre.

Anyway, last night my wife and I turned the cows into a really small paddock with tall and dense forage, in which I’d estimate from past experience they were grazing at well over 500,000 pounds of stock density. The little calves and the cows were all eating almost everything in there. There were still some cheatgrasses, some bermudagrass, a smattering of other warm- and cool-season grasses, and quite a bit of both lambsquarter (pigweed) and giant ragweed of the knee-high to thigh-high variety. They took it all out. It appeared to me each animal was eating a little bit of everything, switching from one plant type to another as they grazed. It’s pretty much what I’ve seen time and again under UHDG or even high stock density.

These are the same results I’m hearing from people all over the globe, on every continent. All are connected through Zietsman’s website and app-based discussion groups he runs. Their pictures and comments they share from their own ranches tell me volumes.

I’ll remind you the first goal of this type management is maximum sustainable profit per acre, which actually incorporates inseparably the goal of land improvement with beef production.

However, an advantage of this type management that has occurred to me lately is the reduced need for goats and sheep to eat the things cattle normally won’t eat. Maybe a little work by goats will be needed at times, but the cattle graze and browse almost all the plants. (Cedars and full-sized trees, of course, will require other control methods.)

Further, as I watch cattle of all ages graze/browse every imaginable kind of plant, I can only imagine what kind of quality they are building into their bodies, therefore their meat and milk.

Debi NewportCalf eating tree leaves

Even calves like fresh tree leaves that haven’t been exposed to grazing, therefore haven’t built up high tannins.

A few weeks ago, I published a blog about the importance of secondary and tertiary compounds in the quality and healthfulness of beef and other meats. It was called Here’s how grassfed beef really could be superior. If you haven’t read it yet, I recommend you do so. Fred Provenza and others recently published a great paper on the importance of these compounds particularly to humans eating meats from animals adapted to diverse, native habitats.

So, besides achieving the highest sustainable stocking rate, the fastest rate of soil and rangeland improvement, and the highest potential profit in a cow-calf operation, you’re also getting the best weed and brush control possible with cattle and the greatest consumption of plants providing a wide variety of nutritional benefits. And by the way, once they learn to eat these plants they will continue eating many of them even when grazing at lower stocking densities.

The caveat is that conventional cattle of today are very poor at this job. They have been bred to graze selectively under continuous grazing and generally to receive large amounts of hay and supplement through large portions of the year. We need to breed cattle suited to this task.

And incidentally, they will have good carcass quality because any beef animal that can thrive under this kind of grazing, laying on fat for winter survival, then fattening in the spring on green grass for calving and reproduction. Any animal that can get fat on grass has great potential to produce a quality carcass, and the US Meat Animal Research Center carcass data on the African Sanga breeds, as well as other testing, has indicated this is true.

The innovators and early adopters of grazing management and now cattle breeding are leading the way. I’m watching.

TAGS: BEEF WEEDS PASTURE

 

Meal for the Men

Allen is working his calves today and Monday (mine are tomorrow) – it’s time for their second round of vaccinations and some fall calving cows need pregnancy checking.  Weather is perfect except super windy.  My job is to prepare lunch for the guys for whenever they arrive.  It’s ready now (11:30), and i was notified that they’ll be in probably about 1p.  Hopefully, all will go smoothly.

For lunch:

  • Beef short ribs offered with BBQ sauce
  • Homegrown slow simmered green beans with onions and garlic
  • Paraguayan Corn Bread (this is a new recipe for me i’ve made a few times this week – adding this one to my lineup and will post recipe soon)
  • Deviled eggs laid by our silly old hens
  • Blackberry cobbler
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Paraguayan Corn Bread (Sopa Paraguaya)
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It was a challenge to fill a plate with neatly peeled eggs.  Although i set a couple dozen back, it was still not long enough for them to peel easily.  In other words, they are too fresh!
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Home picked blackberries with fresh ground wheat berries for the batter.  Yeah, and sugar, and honey, and butter, and milk, and baking powder, and cinnamon.

 

Mustering & Weaning – 18 MAR 19

Weaning calves later than i had planned, but weather always trumps the best laid plans.  Despite there being a chance of rain, the temperatures are warm enough to take the chance to wean my 10-11 month old calves – about time, their mommas could use a rest before calving again as soon as the 15th of April.

With sun shining, using my best Bud William’s stockmanship, I moved the cows forward about 1/2 mile – mostly on foot because of the  mud everywhere and having to cross three deep ditches complete with sucking mud as footing.  So, although the move was slow, the cows and calves cooperated nicely and eventually all rolled into the corral, where i then began sorting cows from calves.  About half done Dallas came up to help finish sorting.  Was very glad for his help given that i’d logged about 29,000 steps in my tall rubber Lacrosse boots.  Without a doubt those boots are NOT made for walking.  At least not that much.  (Hand ‘n Hand Livestock Solutions for discovering stockmanship skills)

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Single strand electrified polybraid and electric netting make that final push to the corral uneventful for one person on foot mustering in 160 adult animals and 100 calves.
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Fenceline weaning – cows are far side of panels quietly eating hay.  Next day, they were ready to move out.  Methinks they were tired of their big babies!!
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Calves on the hillside eating hay with mommas within sight – no worries.  However, by morning, they’ll start missing her.

 

 

 

 

 

The sounds of fenceline weaning the first night.

Cheers!

tauna

My husband has weaned his calves these past two days as well.  The weather is cooperating nicely.

Climate Change and Cows

Great article!

Iowa Agriculture Literacy

By now you’ve probably heard rumors about cow farts containing greenhouse gases or that reducing the meat in your diet will save the planet. But how true are the things you’re hearing? Today, I’d like to go through and fact check some rumors and claims to see where the truth is.

First of all, I’d like to establish what climate and climate change is. Climate is not weather. Weather is how cold or warm or rainy or sunny it is on one particular day. Climate is the pattern. It’s how consistently it is warm or cold or rainy or sunny during certain times of the year. We are experiencing climate change. Things like warmer Arctic temperatures delivering an Arctic blast as far south as the Midwest and more frequent severe storms during the summer months attest to this.

In agriculture, climate change is especially concerning, because agriculture…

View original post 1,164 more words

A Big Snow for Us!

Okay, i know, in many parts of the world, including the United States, a foot of snow is hardly an event.  But we haven’t had accumulation like this for at least a decade!   I’m not a fan of snow, but soft, loose snow like this is useful for subsoil moisture and filling ponds.

Thankfully, with managed grazing protocols in place, one can largely avoid having to get out into the weather and on the bad roads.  Today’s event is continuing, but the temps hovering around 30 degrees.  The snow ploughs have been doing the best they can to keep highways open.

Mostly livestock have no problems grazing through this snow, though heavy cover of ice on top of a foot of snow is actually a really bad situation, which we haven’t had for many, many years.

Below are some photos from years past since i’m not driving up to my farm today on slick roads just to take a photo of my cows.  In a few days, i’ll mosey on up in my JD Gator and check on them.  If they need more grazing, i’ll roll up the polywire and let them have access to the next paddock already set up.  In the next paddock are 5 big hay bales they will have access to as well as mostly grazing.  However, i don’t expect them to need a new break.

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Cattle grazing through snow – strip grazing stockpiles forage
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Sheep bale grazing near a small patch of timber.
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Queen of the Log!  Sheep and horses handle the snow very well, since they will just paw through to the goodies.
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This photo is not taken today, but illustrates how cows and calves alike have no problem grazing through deep snow.  They are not expecting to be fed.  

The only livestock we have that refuses the snow are our small flock of laying hens!

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Happy hens when i fed them inside their eggmobile.  

Be safe out there!!!

tauna

 

 

 

Pregnancy Check – 2018

Pregnancy check and calf vaccinations for fall 2018 are recorded history.  October 25, 2018 held on to become a pretty nice day.  Veterinarian was hour and half late, but with the changes i’d made in the corral which made it more user friendly, we still managed to finish before dark.  The changes shaved at least an hour off working time.

Results of preg check were far more favorable than i could have ever expected given the very hot, dry, droughty, short grass conditions.

135 cows and heifers were checked.

  • Open/Bred
  • 2/39 of the 2 year olds – 95% bred
  • 3/19 of the 3 years olds – 84% bred
  • 2/15 of the 4 year olds – 87% bred *
  • 0/1 of the 5 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/6 of the 6 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/20 of the 7 year olds – 100% bred
  • 1/21 of the 8 year olds – 95% bred
  • 2/8 of the 9 year olds – 75% bred
  • 0/1 of the 10 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/1 of the 11 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/1 of the 12 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/3 of the 13 year olds – 100% bred

Totals – 10/135  = 7.4% open or 92.8% bred

THRILLED with this result even had there not been a drought and i hadn’t changed the breeding season.

Since i was going to Kenya this summer and because i cannot be out past the 15th of August to move the bulls away from the cows (because of severe ragweed allergy), i changed the breeding season from 17 July to 7 July and lopped off 12 days on the end.  In other words, last year breeding season was 17 july – 20 September, but this year is 6 July – 19 August.  Breeding season went from 65 days to 45 days.

According to gestation tables, this puts the first calves arriving April 14th and the last ones on May 28.  I do not like to start calving so early, but since the Corriente cows give such rich milk and combine with heat, humidity, and toxic endophyte fescue of late spring, it was a disaster the two years i calved them out in the mid-May to end of June time frame. (30% calf death loss due to scours despite major treatment).  Add in my allergies, i made the decision for my present season.  We can get some super nasty weather, however, in April, so time will tell.

Measuring for improvement

Cheers

tauna

*(these two young cows raised the biggest calves – not sustainable for my operation)