Tag Archives: friends

Avery Bright – Fiddler

As you know from reading my blog, I home educated my three children for 13 years. Jessica, the eldest, started her homeschool career as a 5th grader, Dallas started 3rd grade, and Nathan started kindergarten and all home schooled through high school graduation. Our three excelled in all manner and two had crazy excellent college academically, but more importantly, through struggle became stronger Christians and spiritual leaders. Dallas, with his challenges with Asperger’s is a huge help on the farm full time. (I am blessed more than i can ever deserve with 3 fabulous children.) On top of that, we made fast friends who were also home schooling families and we are still friends as families.

Just this week, an article was published about our dear friend and fellow home schooler, Avery Bright, concerning his time at Wheaton College and beyond. We remember him as the little boy in cowboy boots running around the churchyard playing tag and soccer, transplanting seedlings in the greenhouse, milking cows at home, or showing pigs in 4-H. But always with his violin practicing, practicing, practicing. From his performances as a middle and high schooler at a local church to raise money for the camps he needed to attend to improve his skills to purchasing his home made CD’s “Jersey Lightning” and “Avery Bright” and later a great Christmas album to boost his coffers to drive to the next amazing endeavor, to driving 12 hours to attend his wedding to his beautiful bride, we’ve always loved and supported Avery and his amazing journey. His brother and sister are no slackers either with their stunning accomplishments – all coming from our dear friends, Eric and Hope – good people who we can always count on for a heart to heart.

Find his music on Spotify at these links:

Or follow all his music at Avery Bright to find all the albums he’s participated on.

Getting off the Page with Avery Bright ’10

SHARE Home / News / Recent News / 2020 / August / Alumnus making music during COVID-19 August 27, 2020

How 2010 alumnus Avery Bright’s Wheaton experience equipped him with the technical and creative skills he needed to thrive as a professional musician during COVID-19.

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Since graduating from Wheaton a decade ago, Avery Bright ’10 has become a professional musician, composer, and producer, working with recording artists ranging from U2 to Michael W. Smith to Phil Wickham, Danny Gokey, Ben Rector, Keith and Kristyn Getty, Little Big Town, and OneRepublic. He’s also played on Star Wars movie scores, spent time in-studio with Dolly Parton, toured Europe, and has played in the pit for arena concerts for rock bands including The Who and Paramore.

When coronavirus began to spread in the U.S. in March 2020, the live music industry turned upside down. Tours, weddings, and live concerts dried up almost completely. Artists and performers had to adapt to remote work quickly–something Bright had been unknowingly preparing to do for years.

Bright has his own recording studio inside of his home outside Nashville, which has provided him with the flexibility to maintain remote work for hire during the global outbreak of COVID-19. Even before the outbreak of COVID-19, Bright worked with clients all over the world–from Colombia to Russia to the UK and Tasmania, Australia–and was able to grow that side of his business as the pandemic threatened the production of live music worldwide.

“I feel very fortunate about the way I’m set up to record remotely from my studio,” Bright said. “I had no idea that it would play well into a global pandemic. I love the connections it’s created for me with artists and producers around the world.”

As a professional musician, session musician, arranger, and composer, Bright divides his time between playing in major studio sessions around Nashville, composing original works on commission for licensing in videos, movies, and video games from his home recording studio called “The String Cell,” and writing and performing original songs and covers as individual artist “RØRE” and as part of duos “Allen & Bright” and “kïngpinguïn.”

Bright credits his Conservatory training, private lessons with Dr. Lee Joiner, and his participation as fiddle player in a student-led bluegrass band called “Tim Dennison and the Creepers” with fellow Wheaties Tim Dennison ’11, Dan Fager ’10, Scott Cunningham ’10, Caleb Lindgren ’10, and Lee McComb ’10 as major contributing factors to his adaptability, flexibility, and success in Music City today.

“I was always sort of the black sheep of the Conservatory because I was at Wheaton for the classical training, but I played in a bluegrass band as a fiddle player and liked to improvise,” Bright said. “My teacher, Dr. Joiner, was always supportive of this. He explored playing jazz and was open to ‘getting off the page,’ as it were. So I always felt comfortable at Wheaton exploring those spaces, and I learned the violin world was much bigger than the obvious path of playing professionally in a symphony or string quartet. Nobody ever told me to stop thinking creatively.”

Bright’s music theory courses at the Conservatory were also integral in preparing him for his career.

“My Conservatory training helped prepare me for some of the technical requirements to execute on studio work like playing in tune and sight reading. I also learned the importance of being flexible,” Bright said. “Those are must-haves for a recording musician. I also learned how to work with different types of people, how to write my own music, and how to think beyond what’s on the page. Wheaton was amazing preparation for that.”

Bright noted that his participation as a fiddle player with Tim Dennison and the Creepers was a highlight of his Wheaton experience.

“There’s no way any of us will ever play in a band that had that much fun,” Bright said. “We all knew it, too: ‘This is as good as it gets.’”

Bright pointed out that, while the transition to working in the COVID-19 pandemic has been very difficult for people and musicians who are completely live-music based–touring musicians with bands, or road crews for big tours, for example–he noted that a lot of artists have pivoted to remote recording and production of livestream concerts, where artists are able to connect with their fan bases and play live online.

“At this time, the silver lining to not being able to play live is you have a golden opportunity to be creative,” Bright said. “People are making EPs from home, writing new songs, doing co-writes on Zoom or Skype, and are finding ways to make it work.”

Bright also pointed out that some larger recording studios are opening back up for business, but at an expense.

“Since March, I’ve played a couple of large recording sessions with 12 players on the floor in the recording room—we were all six feet apart, everyone was in a mask for the whole session. It was all done according to safety regulations, but it’s more expensive and difficult that way now because of the regulations and takes longer,” Bright said. “You also can’t have as many people as you normally would in the studio. All of that takes work, time, and money.” 

Looking to the future, Bright is building out a new studio space above his garage that is larger than his current studio space and will enable him to record ensembles rather than solely overdubs by himself.

“It’s a custom-designed, sound-isolated ‘floating’ room, big enough for four-to-six string players at a time, which will speed up my workflow and productivity a lot,” Bright said. “I’ll also be able to hire more of my friends and colleagues and attract bigger budget projects while providing an incredibly high quality of sound.”

Looking forward to his expanded home studio space is one way Bright is encouraging himself and others around him to “look for the silver lining” in the midst of a global pandemic.

Lawlessness

In the United States, from what we see on the tv, there is increasing lawlessness – rioting with burning, destroying, murdering, hurting – mostly, it seems in the big cities.  Thankfully, none of that in our part of the world is showing, though, we occasionally get some bad stuff going on.  Always seems to run its course when the perpetrators grow up, get a life, and quit being selfish snowflakes.  (also, the coppers getting in there and ferreting them out!)  But in the meantime, sometimes cattle are let out, combines destroyed, vehicles are stolen, inside of new homes being built are trashed, and multiple fires set to old buildings and piles of hay.

But, i hope that we never get to the point that others will attack and kill you for a coat they fancy, or a nice piece of jewelry or a sweet camera.  Yes, there are some countries in which this happens in broad daylight.  Tourists need to take care as to what they are wearing and displaying to avoid being accosted.

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This lovely hand made necklace is a gift from my daughter which she purchased from a crafts lady in DRC (Democratic Republic of the Congo) in 2013 when she traveled with and as a guest of our dear friends Clement and her new husband Patrick.  They live in Kinshasa, but Jessica was able to spend time on Clement’s mom’s farm outside of the city.  

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Hand crafted necklace and matching bracelet.  No real monetary value, but a treasured gift from our friends’ home land.  Nevertheless, i wouldn’t wear this in a public and dangerous place – especially as a tourist.

Road Trip

“Unsuccessful people make decisions based on current situations.   Successful people make decisions based on where they want to be.”   ~ Benjamin Hardy

This kind of goes along with ‘don’t go to the grocery store when you are hungry’.

The weather has been so dismally cold, windy, frozen, snowy, icy, miserable here in north Missouri, i decided to head south a bit to seek sun and warmer temps under the guise of looking for new land for me cows.  Sadly, i seemed to drag the cold weather around with me, although one day was warm enough for 3 hours of saddle time on a good mount with great friends.  A little hiking and exploring, but by and large it was too cold.  One cold afternoon in Eureka Springs, i managed 2 miles in this cute, but busy town, followed by expert mani/pedi before heading north to Ozark, MO.

Although, paradise wasn’t found anywhere on my 2 1/2 week sojourn, my time was better spent visiting and catching up with friends and family.  It was a wonderful time to observe, think, share, reflect, and be lifted in spirit.

Cheers!

tauna

Bright Sunshine!

That forecasted rain hit about 9:30 pm and just poured for about 5 minutes – storm over.  The Mizzou game in Columbia, MO, however, looked like miseryfor a LONG time – it didn’t help that the hometown team lost badly.

Today dawned clear and bright and i managed to clean the frig, wash a load of laundry, feed the calves, wash windows, and start the oven cleaning before the day got started.

Paperwork has been gathered for my trip to Chillicothe in the afternoon to the license bureau.   Allen and I had planned to purchase the pickup through bartering, however, i found out at the license bureau that that can only be done throught a dealership!  No private transactions.  That doesn’t sound fair.  So, of course, i had to pay sales tax after all.  The inspection for the pickup resulted in a $600 repair bill!!

I took some photos of an old McCormick International seed drill that I listed for sale on Powell Seed Farm, Inc facebook page.  It is old and small by today’s standards, but it would be perfect for someone starting out or for use in grass paddock improvements.

Stopped in Meadville at my friend’s house and we had a serious heart to heart visit.  I cannot imagine going through life without a close friend with whom each can share our joys, concerns, and heartaches.

Slow late afternoon since i’d allowed plenty of time for the license bureau, yet i was in and out in less than half an hour!  Fed the calves, worked on my chicken tractor (this is my 9th design and build of chicken tractors and eggmobiles).  I’ve been at the chicken tractor for months, but it’s the lowest item on my priority list, so I seldom have time to piddle around with it.  Had hoped to have it done before i butcher our last 14 hens so as to see if it works, but that may not happen.  Might get chicks next spring, but might not.  I may just enjoy not having extra chores, but it’s fun building stuff – it just won’t get used.

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna