Tag Archives: garden

Price Reduced and Offering Change

My farm in south Missouri has been recently split into two offerings to hopefully generate interest by people with different interests.

This link is to Whitetail Properties who is representing and showing the property.  This piece is 30+/- acres fenced pastures with two ponds, nice shade/timber, beautiful updated earth contact home, detached garage and one bedroom apartment.  Huge barn out back, horse arena, and round pen.  Horse property with home near Springfield, MO.

The other piece is 173 +/- acres just across a lightly used paved road and also includes an RV barn with electrical hookup, fenced, live water, several ponds, stunning views, mountain and mature timber with world class hunting opportunities.  Currently leased for cattle pasture.  Pasture/Timber

Of course, it is also available in its entirety.

Located in Christian County, Missouri

Share and reblog if you will – thanks in advance!

Cheers

tauna

Afternoon view from front door.jpg
View from the front porch of updated home.
Oldfield 009.JPG
Farm View

A CSA App

A new tool is available for market gardeners who operate CSAs!

Open Source Software for CSAs Funded by Western SARE
Press Release

Jacksonville, OR, March 15, 2016 – The Siskiyou Sustainable Cooperative CSA in Southern Oregon has recently unveiled innovative, open source software developed through funds acquired from SARE (Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education) to assist CSA farmers in connecting with their
members. At a time when farmers work hard to keep up with some of the latest trends in the local food movement nationally, CSA coordinator Maud Powell sought to provide a high-tech, user friendly tool to support CSA members interested in having their member information right at their fingertips. “CSAs continue to be a great marketing channel for farmers, but in order to attract customers, they need to be adaptive to cultural trends,” says Maud.

The first of its kind, the CSA App was developed by Josh Shupak with assistance from Lars Faye of Chee Studio and Becky Brown of iWrite. Siskiyou Sustainable Cooperative CSA members participated in surveys and focus groups to determine the features and functionality that would be used in the App. The CSA App supports CSA members with easy access to product information, recipes, cooking and storage tips and nutritional information for the produce found in their weekly CSA shares.

The mobile friendly tool was created using a web based platform and is easily customizable by anyone comfortable using a computer and navigating the internet. “The whole idea is to keep it simple for the farmer and easy to use for the membership,” says Powell. “I wanted to help make CSAs more relevant and accessible for younger generations, and the most obvious way to do that is through the use of technology.” Farmers can utilize the templates in the web platform to create their very own personalized App that can include product information, recipes, cooking videos, farmer bios and any specific instructions about how and where to pick up weekly CSA box deliveries. Creative users may even find additional ways to provide valuable information to their members using mobile technology.

Access to the customizable web platform is provided free of charge, although a valid credit card is required to secure information in the account set up phase. All existing content is open source and available for use, although customization may be necessary to reflect the specifics of a particular CSA farm. The Siskiyou Sustainable Cooperative CSA App can be viewed here: https://mobile-csa.herokuapp.com/.

For instructions on how to get started or for more information visit:
http://www.siskiyoucoop.com/csa/app/.

Becky Brown
Freelance Commercial Writer
541-890-1936

What is CSA (Community Supported Agriculture)?

the Garden – by George Weigel

Quick read in Rural Missouri magazine on pages 29-31. the Garden

Increase Your Gardening ROI – These 10 veggies off the best payback

Four Season Gardening – How to make your yard interesting year-round.

Seven Worst Gardening Blunders – Avoid these mistakes and improve your success.

George Weigel is a Pennsylvania-based horticulturist, garden consultant, author, and newspaper garden columnist.  His website is www.georgeweigel.net

these articles are published in our Rural Missourian Electric Coop magazine with recommendations to contact the University of Missouri extension for gardening tips.  Try checking with the extension in your area for more specific info.

Weather is warming up – get crackin’!

cheers

tauna

 

So You Want To Farm….

There are certainly obstacles  – huge obstacles- in place to keep a person from farming, but if you don’t even have a garden and feeding your family from it – i will suggest you take a really hard look at the reasons keeping you from farming.

Do you lack motivation?  knowledge? funding? land?  Of those four, lack of motivation is the most deadly to keeping you off the land (or whatever your dream).  The others are easily overcome.

The only way to get started is to do it!  In four square feet you can grow 15-20 lbs of pole beans! That is 60 servings of fresh green beans at a start up cost of seed (4 seeds at $0.08 each for $0.32) and a tiny spot of earth.  Plan ahead and start putting all your kitchen scraps into  your planting area all winter long.  Use the lasagne method of building compost in your garden (aka sheet composting).  Retail Value of your crop – $34.35!  On four square feet!  Now, that is not counting your labor or water.  But i can tell you that with green beans, the most labor is in harvesting!

What if you scale that up to 1/4 of an acre?  Don’t forget that gardening doesn’t scale without an increase in labor on every single plant or vegetable that you harvest.  And you can’t go on holiday during the growing season.  Oh, right, the RETAIL value of crop on 1/4 of an acre = $49876!

Before getting too excited about long pole beans, bear in mind, that even though the seeds cost 8 cents a piece and retail value of your production could approach $210,680 per acre,  (difference in math is number of plants on a larger property) it’s a LONG way between purchasing an acre, equipment costs, preparing the soil, purchasing and building trellises, watering when necessary during the next 5-6 months, and, without fail, hand harvesting every 2-3 days after the plants begin producing in about 80 days, finding a market for those fresh beans immediately, or be prepared with refrigeration and storage AND putting money in the bank.  Add in crop failures every once in a while and that seemingly massive income per acre whittles away very quickly.  BUT, with careful management, use of cover crops, crop rotations, offering a variety of staple produce, and developing an excellent market, a good living could be gleaned from a small property – even in town!

Additionally, i can tell you right now, that even if i was so motivated to produce this many best-tasting-beans in the world, there is no way i could find buyers for 92,000 lbs of long pole beans.   We simply have too much food produced in this country (not in Linn, CO) for people to buy that many.  That would be 19 lbs per household in Linn County, MO and $2.29/lb far too expensive.  Cheaper products are available at big box stores.

Just my opinion, but the easiest crops to grow and sell (available market) are tomatoes, bell peppers, green beans, snow peas, garlic, onions, potatoes, cucumbers, squashes (squash bugs are challenging though).  Now, put a sharp pencil to inputs, especially labor and marketability.  Only plant what you want to eat in case you can’t sell it all!  Too much diversity just increases stress!  But some variety all season can bring in more customers.

However, Missouri is considered a minor state in vegetable production, due to inappropriate soils and wide swings in weather variation.  Heavy soils in our north central part are particularly challenging and other than small gardens, vegetable growing is not part of the agricultural base found in this part of Missouri.

 

Ready to explore alternative profitable plants?  Read about these.  But you must do your homework!  Can you even find a market for ginseng or bamboo?

There is a movement across the country to embrace homesteading as a way of life.  Remember, though, farming is hard work with little financial reward, but it can be profitable with careful management, hard work, and no debt.  Keep your day job until the farm is paying.

What are your success stories of living on the land?!

Cheers

tauna

photos 007
Last fall, i put together a very short raised bed.  Only using a raised bed to make it easier to mow around.  This 2 ft x 16 ft spot will be all the gardening i plan this year.  
garden 001
Adding ALL of our kitchen food refuse to the buckets of dried cattle manure that had been placed in the 2 ft by 16 ft box.  My Asian long pole green beans will grow up the wire cattle panel along the back.

 

 

Another no-waste idea

Cutting vegetables this morning for Jerry’s 90th Birthday bash/open house.  Except for the parts that go onto the garden for composting (which was actually only the seeds, pith, and stems of the bell peppers), the rest of so-called waste is in this bag from 2 celery bunches, one cauliflower head, and two small broccoli heads.  This stuff will make great soup stock and soup parts, or chopped up to combine with ground beef or lamb for lumpia filling.  Absolutely nothing went into the bin.

Have fun!

tauna

 

Yom Kippur

Thankfully, I’ve accomplished quite a lot despite being inside most of the days.  I did mess up by mowing a small bit of tall lawn after my recip cows had grazed a spot about as short as they were going to.  Yeah, i was pretty shut down the next day.  My bad.

I had posted on facebook about building what The Seed Guy calls a lasagne bed.  By that he means to layer brown and green compostable stuff to build soil for next spring’s garden.  I scrounged around for a couple of 16 ft boards and cut a couple of 2 ft boards and lag screwed the four pieces into a long box.  Yes, i know that a 4 by 16 foot bed would be more efficient, but as you can see from my photo, i can only reasonable access two feet because of its proximaty to the propane tank.  Plus, this is plenty big for me; i don’t particularly like to garden and i’m not good at it at all.  But, I like a particular variety of heirloom tomato and my Asian long pole green beans.  I might throw in a few lettuce and spinach seeds early in the season.

16 ft x 2 ft raised bed.  Will start layer with cardboard, then add green grass clippings, then maybe hay or food scraps, then top with a sprinkling of soil and wet it down.
16 ft x 2 ft raised bed. Will start layer with cardboard, then add green grass clippings, then maybe hay or food scraps, then top with a sprinkling of soil and wet it down.

Also, managed to defrost and clean out the freezer amongst a host of other tasks.

Vacuumed out first.
Vacuumed out first.
Frozen food stacked outside while the freezer defrosts.
Frozen food stacked outside while the freezer defrosts.
I like to scoop out the ice before it melts. Much easier to pack out ice, than mop up water.
I like to scoop out the ice before it melts. Much easier to pack out ice, than mop up water.

Yom Kippur!

Starts at sundown and goes until tomorrow at sundown.  A shabbat.

What is the prophetic meaning of Yom Kippur?