Tag Archives: garden

Pruning Zucchini?!

Had never heard of pruning zucchini until i searched online for a way to keep my plants producing.  So, i tried it – on all of them – it’ll work or kill them, but it’s okay either way, i have plenty frozen up for winter use now anyway.

I used some hand pruners since these stalks are very easy to cut, yet i was afraid if i tried ripping them off, i would damage the main stalk.  The video i watched said to cut off the leaf stalks up to the first flowers.

Pruned zucchini

Pruned zucchini

 

 

 

Corned Beef & Corn on the Cob

Tough to top this delicious lunch for today!

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Corned Beef

Sandra Best from her days of preparing food for the sheep shearing crew in Longreach, Queensland, Australia

INGREDIENTS: 

  • 5 lb rolled rump roast
  • 4 1/2 quarts of water
  • 2 lbs coarse salt

DIRECTIONS: 

Heat water to dissolve salt then let cool completely. Stab thawed roast about 60 times with a long-tined meat fork. Pour salt water into a #2 ceramic crock and submerge roast into it. Weight down the roast with a brick or whatever. Place crock in a cool place and cover with kitchen towel. Let sit for 9 days. (I found some recipes, which called for turning the roast everyday, but we forgot to do that and it worked fine).

To cook:

Rinse roast, then place in a stockpot filled with enough water to cover roast 1 inch. Bring to slow boil, then pour off water, rinse out pot and refill with enough water to cover roast 1 inch. While water is heating add 2 tablespoons brown sugar, two bay leaves, 1 onion, quartered, 2 teaspoons nutmeg, and 1/4-cup vinegar. Cover and bring to slow boil, then simmer until meat falls off of a fork or skewer. (about 3 hours).

Serve with mashed potatoes or for an easy potluck, break up the meat and stir into potatoes and serve in a crock pot. Or let cool and slice off for sandwiches to take to work.

Life Lesson in the Garden

A life lesson from my friend Tina Reichert.  She lives and works on her husband’s family farm and hosts guests from around the world at their Sycamore Valley Bed and Breakfast home/farm stay outside Brunswick, Missouri.

Enjoy and Shabbat Shalom!

tauna

 

A Little Life Lesson from My Garden

Training the blackberry canes, mulching, weeding, watering, weeding, watering, weeding, more training, weeding, weeding and finally some fruit. Then comes pruning the dead canes that are spent from producing the season’s fruit. But the weeding, watering, training continue through the summer into the fall in preparation for the next year’s crop. I am hot, sweaty (or is it “glowing”), and scratched from the process today. But there is a sense of purpose and accomplishment that makes me smile.

This morning’s garden experience has brought to mind this is a lot like relationships. Meaningful relationships take work, a lot of work, continuous work, sometimes unpleasant and even painful work. But if I want to see the harvest: healthy, vibrant, life giving relationships that flourish bearing much fruit in my life and the lives of others, I must stay the course and remain faithful to the “garden” of relationships the Lord has called me to tend.

“If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone. ” Romans 12:18

I am no Master Gardener, but I know the One who is. He continues to teach little life lessons in the simplest of tasks. Another sweet reason to give thanks for my garden.

May you have a blessed day tending to your “life’s garden.”

 

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Image may contain: plant, sky, tree, outdoor and nature
Image may contain: plant, food, outdoor and nature

A Busy Day!

Typical farm day – nothing exciting – but each activity was successful and that makes for a rewarding, yet exhausting day.  I’ll be sore tomorrow, but Panadol and Pukka tea will help me relax for a good night’s sleep.  Rain forecasted for all day tomorrow, so inside work.

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Using a tractor, front end load, and bucket is not a handy way to accomplish this job, especially in tight quarters and having a bale unroller on the back end.

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Son, Dallas, expertly maneuvered the tractor to level previously hauled dirt in the corral, then we laid large sheets of geotextile fabric i had previously cut, then the 1 1/2 inch gravel was piled and leveled on top.  All this is in preparation for my new cattle working tub which we hope can be installed next week after these rains.

While he was finishing up (and i kept supervising), i had time to walk my weaned calves 1/2 mile from their 5 acre paddock to pasture.  Grass isn’t growing very fast yet, so i hauled two square bales of hay – one good brome and one alfalfa to supplement.  However, the calves are still very much more interested in grazing the bit of green.  It’s a bit of work to feed the square bales since they have to be pushed off a flake at a time.  Each bale weighs 700 lbs.

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Walked my weaned calves to pasture this morning a half mile. Nice and quiet even without a nanny cow. One escapee figured her back around and now she was hurrying to catch up.

Back home, i spent the remainder of the afternoon and evening shoveling soil in a wheelbarrow and moving it to some containers and low spots in my garden.  Then loaded about 30 4 ft old hedge posts onto the flatbed pickup to haul to a neighbour to use as firewood.

How was your day?!

Cheers

tauna

 

Garden is Done

Last night hit 31 F and my garden is wilted and done.  Sadly, there are several large green tomatoes which will not ripen, but not a loss – fried green tomatoes are a treat.  My tomato plants just didn’t get a good early start this year; same with Zucchino Rampicante Squash.  Only two are grown and large.  Incredibly, last year, i had so many of these and they are such good keepers, that i still have 3 of them to eat!  It was a challenging year for growing food.

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This squash is ripened and i’ll harvest it today.

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This monster at nearly 4 foot long isn’t ripe – i’ll harvest it and hope that it will finish in the house.

Master Gardener

Perhaps Jessica was 8 or 9 when she enrolled in the University of Missouri’s Master Gardener program.  That was nearly 20 years ago!  She really got a lot out of it (though i think her favorite lesson was flower arranging) by learning a lot about companion cropping, planting and caring for flowers, trees, and community involvement.  One of the requirements for finishing the program was to do a community service/beautification project.  Contact your local county extension agent for information about Master Gardener and other education programs available in your area.

Anyway,  October Gardening Tips from Garden Talk! for the Heartland garden enthusiast, a 4 page newsletter available online including past editions.

The ones which i will use are:

  1. Transplant deciduous trees after they have dropped their leaves.  We found a few redbud trees saplings we’d like to enjoy closer to our house.
  2. Persimmons start to ripen, especially after frost.  Well this year, no frost yet, but the persimmons are already ripe, picked up, processed, and in the freezer!
  3. Place wire guards around trunks of young fruit trees for protection against mice and rabbits.  Last year, i lost nearly all my new fruit trees during the winter.  i did have protection around them that was about 18 inches tall, but the snow drifted taller than that and the critters girdled them above the protective sleeves by walking on top the snow!!! Grrrrr…..
  4. Continue harvesting produce.
  5. Sow oats as a cover crop (i’m also chopping down the Sunn Hemp and laying it flat on the soil)
  6. Winterize lawn mower.  We send ours to John Deere for complete maintenance then remove the battery and store it inside so it doesn’t freeze.

 

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