Tag Archives: health

Tidiness Tips

  1. Make your bed, hang up your clothes, shut closet door, drawers, straighten rug
  2. If you take it out, put it away – where it belongs!
  3. If you make a mess – clean it up.
  4. When you get out of the car – take all your stuff and rubbish with you.
  5. Deal with paper that comes into your house daily – mostly rubbish usually – which means deep six it immediately – no piling.
  6. Wash the dishes, let dry, put them away along with the drain rack.  Clean and shine sink/faucet/handles.
  7. Clear and wipe counters, sinks, back splash, faucets every day.  Just takes a moment – just do it.
  8. Keep laundry current – when hamper is full – wash the clothes, dry or hang them to dry.  Fold them and put away.  Consider washing a load everyday.
  9. Throw away things that don’t work, give away or sell things you don’t use.
  10. Some tasks simply take time and need doing at least once a week.  Cleaning showers, bathtubs, toilets, vacuuming or washing floors, dusting ceilings, washing walls, windows, sills.  Some prefer scheduling the same time each week to do all or choose one or more to do each day until it’s all done.
  11. Consider carefully whether or not you need more storage units or shelves vs just getting rid of extra stuff.  Less stuff; less to clean.

 

Benefits:

  1. Company can drop in and you won’t be embarrassed or feel the need to apologise for filth.
  2. Having to unload papers and junk from a chair to allow a guest to be seated or clearing papers from the dining table or washing it off before serving puts your guests at odds with feeling welcome – already they feel guilty for causing you extra work on their behalf.
  3. Clean and organised eliminates the stress caused by a chaotic environment.
  4. Putting things away saves time in looking for ‘lost’ items.  “A place for everything and everything in its place.”
  5. Cleaning and keeping things clean often increases its useful life in addition to it looking nice during its life in your home or property.
  6. Being clutter free and organised saves time/money/health.

 

IMG-3891
I’m not a fan of buying shelving or other storage units – usually that just means i’ve got too much stuff.  However, when renovating our old house and enduring NO shelves in the lower cupboards, after 3 years, i finally relented to purchasing this nice inexpensive unit and now, finding stuff is oh such joy!  This is actually called a 2-tier shoe rack, but works perfectly in this space for my needs.  

What are your tips for keeping your house, job, and life neat and tidy?  What are your challenges?

Cheers!

tauna

 

Grazing Management Primer – Part 3

Pond fenced with poly wire electric fence
Alan Newport
You can save a lot of money on water development by taking cattle to existing water sources with temporary electric fence.

Here’s a primer for managed grazing, Part III

A few more thoughts on grass regrowth, animal production and timing.

Alan Newport | Dec 08, 2017

In the first two stories of this series we covered some terms used in managed grazing, provided their definitions, and explained why the terminology and the ideas they represent matter.

In this third and final article of our managed grazing primer, we’ll cover some important concepts that aren’t based in terminology.

Plants: Taller and deeper is better

Early in the days of managed grazing there was a huge and largely mistaken emphasis on grazing plants in Phase II, or vegetative state.

Pushed to its logical end, this resulted in what then grazing consultant Burt Smith once commented about New Zealanders: “They’re so afraid of Phase III growth they never let their plants get out of Phase I.”

Young forage is high in nitrogen/protein and low in energy, while older forage is higher in energy and better balanced in a ratio of nitrogen/protein, although it has higher indigestible content.

This older attitude foiled the greatest advantages of managed grazing. It never let the plants work with soil life to build soil. It never let the grazier build much forage reserve for winter or for drought.

Last but not least, we were told for years the quality of taller, older forages was so poor that cattle could not perform on it. That is not necessarily true of properly managed, multi-species pasture where soil health is on an increasing plane and cattle are harvesting forage for themselves. It’s all in the management.

Balance animal needs with grass management

One of the most important concepts to managing livestock well on forage is to recognize livestock production and nutritional needs and graze accordingly.

If you have dry cows or are dry wintering cattle, you might ask them to eat more of the plants.

Remember the highest quality in mature, fully recovered forage is near the top of the plants and the outer parts of newer or longer leaves

Again depending on livestock class and forage conditions, an affordable and well-designed supplement program can let you graze more severely, also.

Erratic grazing breeds success

Nature is chaotic and constantly changing, so your grazing management needs to be also.

If you graze the same areas the same way and same time each year, you will develop plants you may not want because they will try to fill the voids you are creating and you may hurt plants you desire because they will become grazed down and weakened, perhaps at critical times.

If you move those grazing times and even change animal densities and perhaps also add other grazing species, you will create more diverse plant life and soil life.

Remember, too, that your livestock don’t need to eat everything in the pasture to do a good job grazing.

Cattle legs are for walking

Water is always a limiting factor for managed graziers, but the low-cost solution in many cases is to make cattle walk back to water.

Certainly you can eat up thousands of dollars of profit by installing excessive water systems and numerous permanent water points.

This can be overcome to some degree with temporary fencing back to water and using existing water sources.

Read Part I or Part II.

Beef Short Ribs and Yellow Fat

Health Benefits of Grassfed Food stuffs

Buggers, my photo doesn’t properly show just how yellow the fat is from these super tender grass finished beef short ribs.  I buy grassfed butter from our friends, but it’s extremely expensive, so when i can, i use our home grown beef fat for cooking and flavouring.

Our cattle are fully finished on pasture only – no grain ever – which allows the fat to be high in vitamin E and betacarotenes, thus giving its yellow colour.

Absolutely tasty.  The broth will be frozen up for soup making.

Keep hydrated out there!

tauna

 

Hay & Stockpile Lab Results -2015

Lab Results 2015 – Purdin Paddock 8 Old stockpile from May-June growth

Lab Results 2015 – various

Lab Results — 2015 – Oldfield purchased  hay 2015

Depending on weather conditions, it’s quite likely our cows may need some energy.  What we are concerned about is the lack of green in any of our stockpile which, from what we read, can result in a serious lack of Vitamin A.  We are looking into supplementing that since the lack of this important vitamin results in expensive compromises to animal health.

Cheers

tauna

 

 

Looking Back – 2004

Here’s an old article and our operation has changed a little bit, but we still very much appreciate and use management-intensive grazing (MIG).  All our pastures are subdivided into 20 acres or less paddocks with hi-tensile electric wire.  With the focus on managing the grazing, our animals and soil benefit from good health.

MFGC/GLCI is hosting their 2015 annual conference this week (2-3 Nov) at the Resort at Port Arrowhead, Lake Ozark, Missouri.  

Allen & Tauna Powell Named 2004 “Grasslanders of the Year”
A Linn County farm family was named “grasslanders” at the Missouri Forage and Grassland Council annual meeting at the Lake of the Ozarks in November, 2004.

Allen and Tauna Powell, Laclede, Mo., were named Grasslanders of the Year. The Powells operate a 3000-acre farm stocked with 800 cows that use management-intensive grazing systems. Though the majority of their calves are marketed through traditional commodity channels, the last couple years, they have been finishing calves on grass only and marketing the beef locally and on the Internet.

The Powells learned grass management techniques at grazing schools at the University of Missouri Forage Systems Research Center near Linneus, Mo.

They now serve on the advisory board for the research farm and have been instructors at the grazing schools.

The award was accepted by the family, which includes Jessica, 12; Dallas, 11; and Nathan, 8. The children are home schooled and attended the educational meetings at the MFGC conference after doing their regular homework.

Tauna said, “I thought raising pasture-finished beef was a crazy idea when I first heard it from Fred Martz (former superintendent of MU FSRC.) Now, 12 years later, we are doing it.”

MFGC is an educational association made up of graziers, educators, agency representatives and businesses. It provides support for state and regional grazing schools.

They have also initiated and support a grassland evaluation contest for high school students and travel scholarships for college students attending national meetings.

The Powells were nominated by Fred Martz, retired MU professor and grassland farmer at Columbia, Mo.

Management-intensive grazing improves production and health of pastures, increases livestock gains per acre, and reduces soil erosion. The system is based on dividing large pastures into smaller grazing paddocks. Livestock are moved every few days to give forage time to rest and regrow. Livestock always has fresh pasture to graze.

For more information about the Missouri Forage and Grasslands Council go to their web site athttp://agebb.missouri.edu/mfgc/

Holistic Management Decision Making

Super intro to Holistic Management!

Creating the Farm and Life You Want With Holistic Management

Holistic management testing questions

HOLISTIC MANAGEMENT A WHOLE-FARM DECISION MAKING FRAMEWORK

Even though I’ve known about and used the testing questions for many years, too many times, i go ahead a purchase a band-aid which does nothing but make my work harder and negatively affect my quality of life and that of those i love the most.  While holistic management terms have been used mostly in farm and home circles, the precepts can be applied to most any business.

Good starter questions are:  Why am i doing this job?  If I can let nature do the job, then why am I not letting that happen?  Is there a better way?

Do you have daily repetitive chores?  You can probably get rid of them and not only save a tremendous amount of time, but also considerable out-of-pocket money.  Especially if they are non-income producing time-suckers.  Pets are notorious for this, but also having too many unrelated income streams.

For example, unless you have work horses (even then you’d better know your costs!), the time spent caring for and feeding them is astronomical with absolutely no return!  (unless you are using them for pleasure and have time to do so).  Horses consume 2% to 2.5% dry matter to the body weight or about 21 lbs for a 1000 lb horse.  About the same as a cow.  However, the cow is producing a calf on that same ration.  So, while feeding three horses you could be feeding three cows with the resultant calf sale each year which at current levels is about $1000 per calf.  If you spend 10 minutes a day feeding and watering the horses, in the course of one year, you’ve spent the equivalent of 60.8 hours!  How much productive work could you get done in 60 hours!  So, 60 hours times $15/hour is $900 plus feed, pasture rent, hay costs, water, vaccinations, hoof trimming, emergency vet costs.  You can figure your own costs, but a full-service boarding facility for a 12×12 stall is $250/month per horse (includes turnout and water/feed/hay) or $9000 per year for three horses.  This does not include farrier or vet services.  Pasture only boarding is $160/month, but you would need to care for the horse yourself.  What about tack, training, grooming?  Add up the costs and time.

In a continuous grazing situation, horses will do more damage to the stand of forage than cattle and even sheep in some respects because not only can they nip the new growth to the ground like sheep, but they are heavier and each step carries more weight per square inch than a sheep.  This often leads to pugging in soft pastures.  In other words, horses can destroy a pasture in no time at all.  As Penn State Extension puts it: “turning horses out on pasture should not start until the grass has reached a height of 6 inches, and should be stopped when grass has been grazed down to 2 to 3 inches.”  and “this grazing strategy (continuous) often results in overgrazing,…. The bad thing about this system, it allows horses to be very selective. Horses repeatedly graze the best-tasting plants. This stresses plants beyond their ability to survive. Pasture is never allowed to recover from grazing. In time pastures are soon turned into dry lots where only weeds will grow.”  Penn State’s recommendations are very basic, but a helpful start into learning about managed grazing.

Here’s a good starter article for pasture maintenance:  Care & Feeding of Overgrazed Pastures

This is just one example,  use the test questions against everything you do, gather information, and make the right decision!

Set goals, use the test questions, then really, really wait before buying work or any inputs.  If you need training to help you identify problems and what is a symptom, then get help!  Don’t spin your wheels getting nothing done or worse, digging a deeper hole and remaining confused by why you aren’t getting ahead.  Ask!  But if you are not ready to implement what you learn or make changes, then don’t waste your money or other people’s time.

HMI Testing Questions

Resources from Holistic Management International!

Creating Healthy Soil

Free Downloads

You and I won’t agree with all of HMI’s ideas, but there is a ton of good information and help for getting you started in a new business, established business, or life in general.

Shalom!

tauna