Tag Archives: health

Greens in the Winter

Snow has kept me from getting out of our driveway since i returned from Fundo Panguilemu – arriving at MCI in a snow and ice storm on 11 Jan.  However, the day i arrived, i got back into the habit of growing sprouts for health and greens.  Now, my husband and son refuse to eat sprouts, so they have green beans or nothing.

Although, i have several gallons of home grown green beans frozen up from 2018 (last year’s crop was a bust due to getting shaded out i mess up so much),  we do get tired of eating them everyday.

Finally, got to town last Friday (24 Jan)- all three of us crowded into the four wheel drive pickup since we combined scooping snow off the sidewalks at the church, stopping in at the bank, and the grocery shopping (picked up a clam shell of organic lettuce/spinach).  The shopping had to fit in three cloth bags and tied to the back of the flatbed pickup.  It was a bit soggy on the bottom of the sacks, because of melted snow, dirty hay, and mud – but it was not big deal – main thing we didn’t lose anything blowing off.  (First world problems  HA!)

Cheers!

tauna

 

Watching Grass Grow

Thank you to all of you who take the time to ‘like’ or read or view my blog postings.  Goodness knows, some of them are pretty specific to ranching and farming, but since we all eat then, perhaps in a small way, nearly all of them relate to all of us – so, just maybe not really interesting.  These videos are great illustrations of why growing grass, then properly managing it for optimum animal, soil, forage, water, and ultimately human health is so important.  If you are into the carbon credit, carbon sink, carbon sequestration thing, this is the heart of the matter.  So, here we go…..!  Thanks to On Pasture for finding and sharing great information.

Let’s Watch Grass Grow!

By   /  January 20, 2020  /  1 Comment

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You know how we always tell you that leaving more leaves of grass results in quicker recovery, and quicker recovery means more forage for your livestock?  If you’d like to see that in action, here some videos you’ll like.

This first video is a comparison of the difference in response between Orchard grass continuously grazed to about 1″ height and rotationally grazed Orchard grass left at 3.5 inches tall. It’s taken over a 5 day period.

Here’s the last picture in the series to give you a closer look:

This second video does the same comparison with tall fescue. The grass on the left was grazed continuously to 1″. The grass on the right was rotationally grazed to 3.5 inches.

Again, here’s the final picture in the time-lapse:

It’s also interesting to compare the responses of different grasses. This last video compares Orchard grass on the left to fescue on the right. Both were “grazed” to 3.5 inches once a month. The video takes place over 7 days.

Here’s the last picture from this time-lapse series:

What kind of ideas do these videos give you?

Of course, time of year that grazing occurs and the amount of rest between grazings all factor in to the complex task a grazier has of managing stock. For more, check out this two-part series from Dave Pratt about grazing heights, rest and recovery times, and seasonality.

This picture links to an article by Dave Pratt talking about why it is one of the most important words in a grazier’s vocabulary if you want to build capacity on your farm or ranch.

This week he applies his principle of “leaving more leaves” to show how this works as forages change through the growing season.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Publisher, Editor and Author

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she’s not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

1 COMMENT

  1. CURT GESCH says:

    The photo time lapse sequence is great: clear and convincing (if we needed any convincing). It’s also something we could do at home in pots, but maybe better than that in a field with a rest for a stationery camera. I would like to see 1″ versus 6″ on Orchard grass. Maybe I’ll try to set it up?

 

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Mob stocked paddocks with heavy utilization followed by a long rest.  Proven practice that builds soil, forage diversity, healthy livestock diet, deep roots providing protection against soil erosion of all types.  View of Fundo Panguilemu.
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Proper land management results in this sward!  My camera does not do justice to the beautiful example coaxed by Jose and Elizabeth, (owners of Fundo Panguilemu), with the use of their cattle and sheep.  Contact Jose in Chile to help develop your plan or in the States, Jim Gerrish, American Grazinglands Services, LLC
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This kind of grazing management (short duration mobbing, long rest period) is what creates magnificent sward of healthy soil and forage.  Thanks to Elizabeth Barkla de Gortazar for this illustrative photo.
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No bare soil here!
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A luscious sward for beauty and health.

Sprouting!

Basic instructions for sprouting healthy addition to salads, sandwich toppings, or  a stand alone snack.

Put 3 tablespoons of seed into your sprouting jar.  Add 2-3 times as much cool (60°-70°) water.  Mix seeds up to assure even water contact for all.   Let stand in water 6-12 hours.

Drain off soak water.  Rinse thoroughly in cool water. Drain thoroughly!  (this is important)

Set sprouting jar anywhere out of direct sunlight and at room temperature (70° is optimal) between rinses. Ensure sufficient air circulation is provided.

Rinse with cool water and drain thoroughly every 12 hours for 3-7 days.  Always drain thoroughly.  Refrigerate after growing if you don’t eat them all straightaway.

Food borne illness is a possibility when consuming raw products.  Sprouts will smell fresh not musty.  Keep them cool.

Here’s an interesting article concerning health benefits.

Raw Sprouts:  Benefits and Potential Risks

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Day 1 – 3 tablespoons of sprouting seeds in a quart jar with screen top or use cheesecloth and a rubber band.  These are broccoli, alfalfa, radish, and clover seeds.  I’ve chose Food To Live brand, but there are others.
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Day 1 – pour in some cool water, swish it around to stir up the seeds, then allow to stand in water for 6-12 hours.  Pour out the water.  Add more and swirl around then drain thoroughly.
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Day 3 – Be sure to add cool water, swirl it around to rinse seeds and drain thoroughly EVERY DAY TWICE A DAY!
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I start another batch every 3 days or so because i like a continuous supply to eat if i want them.  This batch is using 2 tablespoons rather than 3 tablespoons in this quart jar which should allow more room to grow longer and green up more.  This also helps eliminate those extra crunchy seeds by allowing the it to sprout longer.
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This first batch had filled the jar in 6 days.

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Great for toppings on sloppy joes, sandwiches, and most everything!  —  well, maybe not ice cream.
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Or as a stand alone salad.  Here i sliced olives and our home raised eggs.  Squirt a bit of dressing you like on top or none at all.  

Tidiness Tips

  1. Make your bed, hang up your clothes, shut closet door, drawers, straighten rug
  2. If you take it out, put it away – where it belongs!
  3. If you make a mess – clean it up.
  4. When you get out of the car – take all your stuff and rubbish with you.
  5. Deal with paper that comes into your house daily – mostly rubbish usually – which means deep six it immediately – no piling.
  6. Wash the dishes, let dry, put them away along with the drain rack.  Clean and shine sink/faucet/handles.
  7. Clear and wipe counters, sinks, back splash, faucets every day.  Just takes a moment – just do it.
  8. Keep laundry current – when hamper is full – wash the clothes, dry or hang them to dry.  Fold them and put away.  Consider washing a load everyday.
  9. Throw away things that don’t work, give away or sell things you don’t use.
  10. Some tasks simply take time and need doing at least once a week.  Cleaning showers, bathtubs, toilets, vacuuming or washing floors, dusting ceilings, washing walls, windows, sills.  Some prefer scheduling the same time each week to do all or choose one or more to do each day until it’s all done.
  11. Consider carefully whether or not you need more storage units or shelves vs just getting rid of extra stuff.  Less stuff; less to clean.

 

Benefits:

  1. Company can drop in and you won’t be embarrassed or feel the need to apologise for filth.
  2. Having to unload papers and junk from a chair to allow a guest to be seated or clearing papers from the dining table or washing it off before serving puts your guests at odds with feeling welcome – already they feel guilty for causing you extra work on their behalf.
  3. Clean and organised eliminates the stress caused by a chaotic environment.
  4. Putting things away saves time in looking for ‘lost’ items.  “A place for everything and everything in its place.”
  5. Cleaning and keeping things clean often increases its useful life in addition to it looking nice during its life in your home or property.
  6. Being clutter free and organised saves time/money/health.

 

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I’m not a fan of buying shelving or other storage units – usually that just means i’ve got too much stuff.  However, when renovating our old house and enduring NO shelves in the lower cupboards, after 3 years, i finally relented to purchasing this nice inexpensive unit and now, finding stuff is oh such joy!  This is actually called a 2-tier shoe rack, but works perfectly in this space for my needs.  

What are your tips for keeping your house, job, and life neat and tidy?  What are your challenges?

Cheers!

tauna

 

Grazing Management Primer – Part 3

Pond fenced with poly wire electric fence
Alan Newport
You can save a lot of money on water development by taking cattle to existing water sources with temporary electric fence.

Here’s a primer for managed grazing, Part III

A few more thoughts on grass regrowth, animal production and timing.

Alan Newport | Dec 08, 2017

In the first two stories of this series we covered some terms used in managed grazing, provided their definitions, and explained why the terminology and the ideas they represent matter.

In this third and final article of our managed grazing primer, we’ll cover some important concepts that aren’t based in terminology.

Plants: Taller and deeper is better

Early in the days of managed grazing there was a huge and largely mistaken emphasis on grazing plants in Phase II, or vegetative state.

Pushed to its logical end, this resulted in what then grazing consultant Burt Smith once commented about New Zealanders: “They’re so afraid of Phase III growth they never let their plants get out of Phase I.”

Young forage is high in nitrogen/protein and low in energy, while older forage is higher in energy and better balanced in a ratio of nitrogen/protein, although it has higher indigestible content.

This older attitude foiled the greatest advantages of managed grazing. It never let the plants work with soil life to build soil. It never let the grazier build much forage reserve for winter or for drought.

Last but not least, we were told for years the quality of taller, older forages was so poor that cattle could not perform on it. That is not necessarily true of properly managed, multi-species pasture where soil health is on an increasing plane and cattle are harvesting forage for themselves. It’s all in the management.

Balance animal needs with grass management

One of the most important concepts to managing livestock well on forage is to recognize livestock production and nutritional needs and graze accordingly.

If you have dry cows or are dry wintering cattle, you might ask them to eat more of the plants.

Remember the highest quality in mature, fully recovered forage is near the top of the plants and the outer parts of newer or longer leaves

Again depending on livestock class and forage conditions, an affordable and well-designed supplement program can let you graze more severely, also.

Erratic grazing breeds success

Nature is chaotic and constantly changing, so your grazing management needs to be also.

If you graze the same areas the same way and same time each year, you will develop plants you may not want because they will try to fill the voids you are creating and you may hurt plants you desire because they will become grazed down and weakened, perhaps at critical times.

If you move those grazing times and even change animal densities and perhaps also add other grazing species, you will create more diverse plant life and soil life.

Remember, too, that your livestock don’t need to eat everything in the pasture to do a good job grazing.

Cattle legs are for walking

Water is always a limiting factor for managed graziers, but the low-cost solution in many cases is to make cattle walk back to water.

Certainly you can eat up thousands of dollars of profit by installing excessive water systems and numerous permanent water points.

This can be overcome to some degree with temporary fencing back to water and using existing water sources.

Read Part I or Part II.

Beef Short Ribs and Yellow Fat

Health Benefits of Grassfed Food stuffs

Buggers, my photo doesn’t properly show just how yellow the fat is from these super tender grass finished beef short ribs.  I buy grassfed butter from our friends, but it’s extremely expensive, so when i can, i use our home grown beef fat for cooking and flavouring.

Our cattle are fully finished on pasture only – no grain ever – which allows the fat to be high in vitamin E and betacarotenes, thus giving its yellow colour.

Absolutely tasty.  The broth will be frozen up for soup making.

Keep hydrated out there!

tauna

 

Hay & Stockpile Lab Results -2015

Lab Results 2015 – Purdin Paddock 8 Old stockpile from May-June growth

Lab Results 2015 – various

Lab Results — 2015 – Oldfield purchased  hay 2015

Depending on weather conditions, it’s quite likely our cows may need some energy.  What we are concerned about is the lack of green in any of our stockpile which, from what we read, can result in a serious lack of Vitamin A.  We are looking into supplementing that since the lack of this important vitamin results in expensive compromises to animal health.

Cheers

tauna