Tag Archives: honor

Convictions of Honor and Good Sense

Another great blog by Paul Marchant

Irons in the fire: Convictions of honor and good sense

Paul Marchant for Progressive Cattle Published on 24 February 2020

His color was just ordinary old bay, but he was a real looker – big, stout hip; nice, neat, pretty head; solid, heavy bone; four black feet and built like a brick house.

I wasn’t a real virtuoso in the art of horse trading, but I figured a $1,200 investment was a surefire deal on one of the prettiest 3-year-old geldings I’d ever had a crack at. We weren’t exactly flush with cash, but I convinced my wife I knew what I was doing. In a couple years, and with a few wet saddle blankets, there was no doubt we’d get four or five times our money back. He was that kind of a horse.

Like the shiniest girl in the homecoming court, he seemed to have figured out that his looks could help him get away with quite a bit more than the average geek at the back of the class. From the first ride, he was a little goosey, but he was an honest bucker. He’d hog and snort pretty much the whole way across a 320, but he’d always buck in a straight line, so I got a counterfeit confidence in my super-punchiness. Every time I stepped aboard, I could count on some sort of action from him. But somehow, he never bucked me off, and I wasn’t going to give in.

It was mid-October. We were gathering off the mountain. It was nearly dark, and I’d been riding the prima donna bay since early that morning with nary a hint of mischief from him. I’d picked up half a dozen pairs and was following them down a steep trail out of a long canyon. To the right of the trail was a rough, rocky mass of brush and boulders. To the left was a steep 80-foot drop-off, with the creek running down the bottom of the canyon. It was at this particular juncture of space and time that the bay rascal decided to cut loose. I rode him through the first couple of jumps, but it quickly became apparent I was in a bad spot.

There was going to be a wreck. I bailed off on the uphill side and ended up with my feet in the air, in the middle of a big snowberry bush. By the time I’d gathered my senses and body parts and determined an ankle sprain and a bruised ego were the extent of my injuries, the noise and ruckus down the trail had stopped. I hobbled 75 yards down the trail where I found my erstwhile can’t-miss money maker in a scraped-up pile of horseflesh. He’d somehow managed to get his front leg through the breast collar, which sent him tail over tea kettle and brought his rampage to a halt. I got the mess of tack and horse untangled and got him resaddled. The horse didn’t really appear to be injured, but there was a trickle of blood coming from one nostril, and he seemed shrouded in a hazy humility.

I got to the trailer about an hour after dark and finally made it home, where I hobbled into the house to a wife and three young kids who’d long since learned to mask their worries when my return was hours later than it should have been. I cussed the horse as I told my tale, but I assured them I was pretty sure I’d finally “rode the rough off him.” And, indeed, I had. His little trickle of a nosebleed never really stopped, and a week later he died, a victim of his own foolishness and an apparent lung injury.

About 20 years later, I had another pretty bay horse, a mare. She had a colt my son named Winston, in honor of the late, great British prime minister, whom my son had often heard me praise. One of my favorite Churchill quotes was from his “never give in” speech, which he gave in October of 1941 at his alma mater, the all-boys Harrow School.

“…never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never – in nothing great or small, large or petty – never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.”

I’d always abridged the real power of the speech to simply mean that one should never give up in whatever pursuit he or she may be after. It’s always handy for a halftime speech when you’re down by 15. The real beauty and wisdom of the statement, however, is found in the last eight words of the message.

Sir Winston realized that unrelenting determination is for naught if the cause is not just or rational. The goals of imperial Japan and Nazi Germany would have been justified in the dogged pursuit of their maniacal leaders’ ambitions, if the goal were simply to never give up, no matter what. Such a quest is rather elementary. But to have the acumen to steadfastly fight on but give in only to convictions of honor and good sense takes genuine fortitude and wisdom.

There’s little sense in riding a crazy horse off a cliff while the wife and kids need you at home. end mark

Paul Marchant is a cowboy and part-time freelance writer based in southern Idaho. Follow him on Twitter, or email Paul Marchant.

Paul Marchant

The One Who Helps

I took this from Facebook this morning – there have been several write ups of this ilk and i’ve even made comments on Facebook sharing my experiences that in the agriculture world women ’empowerment’ (whatever that looks like as opposed to lifting up anyone and everyone)  is not necessary – men, women, and children respect and help each other.  (well, except me – i’m kind of mean and scary).  If you think you need to be in a march of some sort to promote women, then you hang out with the wrong crowd.  There is a world out there where people are pulling together and not ripping each other apart.

Shalom!

tauna

Sue Tebow

While women march the streets of America, protesting for rights that they already have, allow me to applaud a way of life that has honored women in ways the rest of the world never has (for a very long time).
I’m proud to be a part of the silent, steadfast women of rural America, where:

Little girls are taught to work alongside little boys, not hate them.

We let the men lead us on the dance floor, in prayer, and in life. There is strength in partnership.

The woman’s housekeeping and the man’s ranch work are both vital aspects of the operation’s success, even though gender roles don’t have much of a place on the ranch.

Women ride Bronc’s, wrestle calves, and rope just as often as men cook, sew and tend to children.

We actually participate in meetings, sit on boards, and vote to create REAL change.

We see the miracle of life in every foal, calf, and child and believe all life should be protected.

The men never question a woman’s strength, and women know that a door held open is a simple sign of respect.

The ranchers/farmers/blue collar people of America create empowered women, respectful men, and a brighter future than any “protest” could bring about.

Sue Tebow founder of agri.CULTURE
AUTHOR: Kaycee Monnes
PC – Robin L Green

Rodeo Way.

I never thought about this, but it’s true!!!

livehumblyandhavefaith

rodeo


Stands filling up, quickly. The ‘pump up’ music playing. A bronc starts dancing in the chute. Fresh arena dirt and fresh livestock. 

The excitement is felt, seen and heard. An electricity that is circulating throughout the stock, contestants, and spectators. And then, the announcer begins to speak…

He doesn’t begin by giving the statistics of the riders, or rant about the stock contractors, no. The announcer begins with “This is the home of the free and the land of the brave and because of that we want to honor those who give up their freedom so we can enjoy ours. Every Marine, Sailor, Airman, First responder, please stand up.” Some slower than others, stand. Stand in remembrance of their fellow men and women, stand in remembrance of the commitment they made to this country. Stand to be honored. And as each one stands up, the electricity of the building, changes, ever so slightly, as…

View original post 437 more words

Memorial Day – USA

Although the focus of Memorial Day (formerly Decoration Day) is for our fallen war veterans (and rightly so), most of us also use this time to remember and honor our family and friends who have died as well. My routine is to take fresh flowers to the graves of my grandparents, Virgil Lee and Virginia Lea (Pulliam) Falconer, my dad, Stanley Lee Falconer, my great grandparents, Dallas and Hermia (Bowyer) Falconer, and Susan Emily Pulliam. Last year (2014) with Memorial Day a bit earlier and the extended cold winter, there were few flowers about and no roses at all. So I started looking for attractive greenery. These included eastern red cedar branches and wild grape vines stuck in with the few irises and peony blossoms made for what I thought was an attractive bouquet. Even tried some dusty miller, but it wilts too quickly.

Although it is cold again this year (2015) and Memorial Day is early, we have had an abundance of flowers for decorations.  I liked the greenery from last year, so I still included some this year.

Have a safe Memorial Day weekend.

tauna

Memorial Day - 2014.   With fewer flowers available due to cold weather, greenery, such as cedar trees, grapevines, and other greens contributed to a lovely bouquet.
Memorial Day – 2014. With fewer flowers available due to cold weather, greenery, such as cedar trees, grapevines, and other greens contributed to a lovely bouquet.
More flowers available, including roses.  My grandma always enjoyed roses, so I put more roses in her vase.
More flowers available, including roses. My grandma always enjoyed roses, so I put more roses in her vase.
Linneus, MO dressing up for Memorial Weekend and Day.
Linneus, MO dressing up for Memorial Weekend and Day.