Tag Archives: Missouri

Getting Into the Cattle Business: Buying a Ranch and Making it Pay

Solid figures to help me decide whether or not to pursue any land purchases should any come up for sale. Farms in Linn County, MO rarely change hands.

Land & Livestock International, Inc.

By Dr. Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume, President & CEO, Land & Livestock International, Inc.

What and Why?

First, do you want to own a ranch or do you just want to be in the cattle business? Did you know that you can enter the cattle business without owning either land or cattle?

"Waiting for a Chinnook" Also known ...
“Waiting for a Chinnook” Also known as “Last of the 5000”

You are already thinking, “This guy has lost his mind!” But seriously, you can. You can lease land and take in pasture cattle–i.e. you can pasture someone else’s cattle on leased land for a monthly per head fee. Once you get a reputation for paying your bills and taking good care of other peoples land, ranch lease opportunities will come to you. You won’t have to look for them.

This is an excellent way for young prospective ranchers to get into the business without having to…

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Dangers of Grazing E+ Fescue Short

Study Shows Dangers of Short Grazing Toxic-Fescue Pastures by Cattle Herds

Research results published November 30, 2017 by Sarah Kenyon, PhD, University of Missouri once again illustrate how grazing the non-native, invasive toxic-endophyte (E+) fescue plant causes health problems in cattle and other livestock, including horses.  Other studies show the effects on the soil microbial populations and wildlife.  E+ Fescue is pervasive, persistent, and poisonous.

Short grazing of E+ fescue in the last fall/early winter before a killing frost has been used by us and others to manage the spring growth of the plant by shortening the root system which slows spring growth, allowing more desirable grasses and legumes to get a foot hold.  This is effective, but a relentless endeavor since it must be done every fall/winter to control the fescue and quite simply, there is no way to manage ALL the fescue at once everywhere on the farm.

I’m thankful for professors and agricultural leaders bucking the status quo and revealing this long-known information to a modern generation and offering solutions to not only mitigate the health issues associated with the toxin, but also ideas on eradicating it.  Time will tell if changes will work – it’s expensive to renovate and manage pastures and fields – – and farming and ranching does not lend itself to wide margins of profits to plough back into improvements.

Cheers!

tauna

Price Reduced and Offering Change

My farm in south Missouri has been recently split into two offerings to hopefully generate interest by people with different interests.

This link is to Whitetail Properties who is representing and showing the property.  This piece is 30+/- acres fenced pastures with two ponds, nice shade/timber, beautiful updated earth contact home, detached garage and one bedroom apartment.  Huge barn out back, horse arena, and round pen.  Horse property with home near Springfield, MO.

The other piece is 173 +/- acres just across a lightly used paved road and also includes an RV barn with electrical hookup, fenced, live water, several ponds, stunning views, mountain and mature timber with world class hunting opportunities.  Currently leased for cattle pasture.  Pasture/Timber

Of course, it is also available in its entirety.

Located in Christian County, Missouri

Share and reblog if you will – thanks in advance!

Cheers

tauna

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View from the front porch of updated home.
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Farm View

The Hummingbird Bakery

“If you buy your dairy at the supermarket, the butter aisle can seem a baffling place. However, the margarine-versus-butter debate is quite straightforward if you are a baker: no quality cake is ever made with anything less than honest, quality-made butter.”

A great meal starts with great ingredients.  And Hummingbird Bakery makes it clear they are committed to creating superb cakes, cheesecakes, whoopie pies, brownies, and cupcakes for a discerning audience. (though i doubt they can rival Kaitlynn Reichert’s cheesecakes in Brunswick, MO)

There are even cookbooks you can buy if you want try you hand at recreating their lovelies at home.  However, i have seen a few of them posted online by other people.  For example, the frosted brownie i enjoyed, here’s the recipe, but I’m not home to try it yet.

Three convenient locations, Mall of the Emirates, Dubai Mall, and Citywalk Dubai as well as delivery and custom care.

Yum Yum

tauna

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Individual treats generally priced between 13 and 18 dirhams (AED) which translates to about $3.50 to $4.90. My frosted brownie was 15 dirhams.
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Scrumptious desserts delightfully packaged!

 

 

Green Hills Farm Project

Started in 1988, Green Hills Farm Project is non-profit, family-oriented, sustainable agriculture group of like-minded farmer families who support each other in sometimes crazy ideas.  Each month, we meet with a potluck and farm tour at members’ farms and ranches and once annually with an invited guest speaker.  This year on 4 March, we welcome Jim Gerrish, world renowned grazing expert,  back to his old stomping grounds at FSRC (Forage Systems Research Center) at Linneus, MO to share his unique perspective with a presentation entitled, “Grazing Around the World.”

Join us on Green Hills Farm Project Facebook page for upcoming events!

Here is your invitation!  (GHFP meetings and farm walks are open to the world)

Jim Gerrish, author of Management-Intensive Grazing – The Grassroots of Grass Farming and Kick the Hay Habit – A Practical Guide to Year-Around Grazing, is our guest speaker at the Green Hills Farm Project annual winter seminar March 4, 2017 At FSRC (Forage Systems Research Center, Linneus, MO). Known world wide as an expert in management-intensive grazing systems, Jim is also available for private consultation. Today’s seminar “Grazing Around the World” will be exciting insight into grazing management in many different climates and cultures from Jim and his wife, Dawn’s, personal experience. American GrazingLands Services, LLC.  Jim and Dawn now reside near May, Idaho.american-grazing-lands-pasture-walk-jim-gerrish

This annual seminar has a cost of $30 per family and will include a one year membership to Green Hills Farm Project. Please bring a potluck/carry in dish for lunch. More information contact Allen Powell at 660.412.2001 or myself (tauna) – taunapowell@gmail.com

Hope Ya’ll Can Come!!

Cheers

tauna

 

 

 

David Rankin, Farmer, 1906

In a recent farm magazine, a young farmer was recognised in an article as one of  America’s (United States)  best.  Lo, and behold, he is from Tarkio, Missouri and the article made mention of David Rankin, Missouri Corn King, who died in 1910, but had amassed 30,000 acres, 12,000 head of cattle, and 25,000 hogs. It was reported that he raised a million bushels of corn in a single season, much of it from a 6,000 acre field.

David Rankin, Farmer: Modern Agricultural Methods Contrasted With Primitive Agricultural Methods By The Life History Of A Plain Farmer (1909)

So, i did a quick search online about Farmer Rankin and to my delight, discovered he wrote a small book about his life and how he managed his assets to obtain such wealth.  ALthough the writing is not fancy and sometimes seems disjointed, his simple outline is a great insight into basic business management.  Some of his early income would have been taxed at a 3%-5% rate, but that income tax was rescinded in 1872.  Full on income tax didn’t come about until 1913.

But the crux of his idea, is to invest in time saving modern implements and buy land.  For a time, he was paying 17%-18% interest on money he borrowed to buy land.  Granted, he had some good hits that were just plain lucky, but not always.

You can read his short book here for free online or it can be ordered for a modest amount on Amazon.

Multiflora Rose

History of multiflora rose from the Missouri Department of Conservation website:

“Multiflora rose was originally introduced to the East Coast from Japan in 1886 as rootstock for cultivated roses. In the 1930s the U.S. Soil Conservation Service advocated use of multiflora rose in soil erosion control. Experimental plantings were conducted in Missouri and Illinois, and as recently as the late 1960s, many state conservation departments were distributing rooted cuttings to landowners. It was planted in the Midwest for living fences and soil conservation. Managers recognized that plantings of this thorny, bushy shrub provided excellent escape cover and a source of winter food for wildlife. The species soon spread and became a serious invader of agricultural lands, pastures, and natural communities from the Midwest to the East Coast.”

The trunk can be as wide as 8 inches diameter and the bush can exceed 15 feet.  They are extremely hard to control and viciously difficult to handle because of the length of canes and that they are covered with thorns.  Millions of dollars are spent in time in mechanical and chemical control of these government-introduced, non-native, invasive shrubs.

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Thankfully, most of our multiflora rose bushes are not as huge as this one in view of Brook Road.  I estimate the highest canes of this bush to be nearly 20 feet!  We, along with every farmer and rancher in Missouri battle these things year round.  I’m certain they would take over the world if left unchecked!