Tag Archives: noodles

Grinding Fresh Berries

As i grind pound after pound of hard red winter and white winter wheat, i wanted to know the best use for the various varieties.  I also have some Einkorn berries, an ancient grain with original DNA, which i’m finding difficult succeed with using it by itself.  But i keep trying.  It’s a lovely nutty flavour.

What a fabulously helpful article written by Julia Debes and provided by the Kansas Wheat Cooperative

Posted December 2, 2014

Six classes of U.S. wheat

You stuffed yourself with Thanksgiving pie and warm rolls in November. And the smell of Christmas cookies baking fills the air in December. You know you can count on your family’s special baked good, shared year after year, during the holiday season. But, you might not realize that each product may require a different type of flour, maybe even a different class of wheat.

Image: U.S. map of the 6 classes of wheat.

American wheat farmers grow six classes of wheat. Each wheat variety fits into one of these six categories based on the growing season (winter or spring), hardness (hard or soft) and color (red or white). While munching on holiday treats this year, stump your relatives with these class differences.

Hard Red Winter (HRW)

Ninety five percent of the wheat grown in Kansas is hard red winter (HRW). In fact, Kansas farmers grow more HRW wheat than any other state.

With high protein and strong gluten, HRW wheat is ideal for yeast bread and rolls. But, this versatile class is also used in flat breads, tortillas, cereal, general purpose flour and Asian-style noodles.

Hard White (HW)

About three percent of wheat grown by Kansas farmers is hard white (HW) wheat. This class is grown primarily under contract.

HW wheat is used for whole wheat white flour, due to its naturally milder, sweeter flavor. Bakers also use HW wheat in pan breads, tortillas, flat breads and Asian-style noodles.

Soft Red Winter (SRW)

Less than 1 percent of the wheat planted by Kansas wheat farmers is soft red winter (SRW). Farmers east of the Mississippi River often double crop SRW wheat with soybeans.

Soft wheats have lower protein and less gluten strength. This makes SRW ideally suited for cookies, crackers, pastries, flat breads and pretzels. SRW wheat is even used in Maker’s Mark and Twizzlers.

Soft White (SW)

Pacific Northwest farmers grow primarily soft white (SW) wheat – both winter and spring varieties. SW wheat has two sub-classes. Club wheat has very weak gluten and western white is a blend of club and SW.

SW wheat has low moisture, but high extraction rates. With a naturally whiter color, SW wheat is used for Asian-style bakery products, cakes and pastries. Fun fact, Triscuits refer to SW as the “cashmere” of wheats.

Hard Red Spring (HRS)

Northern plains farmers require a shorter season crop wheat crop. Hard red spring (HRS) wheat is planted in early spring, rather than the fall, and does not vernalize or go dormant over the winter.

HRS wheat has high protein and strong gluten, perfect for artisan breads and rolls, croissants, bagels and pizza crust. Internationally, HRS is often blended with domestic wheats supplies to improve the strength of a flour blend.

Durum

Durum is the hardest of all six wheat classes, produced in two areas of the United States. The northern plains grows hard amber durum, while the desert southwest (Arizona, California) grows Desert Durum® under irrigation.

With a rich amber color and high gluten content, durum wheat is used primarily for pasta, couscous and some Mediterranean breads.

By Julia Debes

Wheat classes

Egg Noodles

Egg Noodles
INGREDIENTS
2 cups unbleached white or whole wheat flour
3 egg yolks
1 egg
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 to 1/2 cup water
DIRECTIONS
Make a well in center of flour. Add egg yolks, egg, and salt; mix thoroughly . Mix in water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until dough is stiff but easy to roll. Divide dough into 4 equal parts. Roll dough, one part at a time, into paper-tin rectangle on well-floured cloth-covered board. Cut into narrow strips with a knife or noodle cutter. Shake out strips and place on towel until stiff and dry, about 2 hours. Break dry strips into smaller pieces. Cook in 3 quarts boiling salted water (1 tablespoon salt) until tender, 12 to 15 minutes; drain. About 6 cups noodles. Storage: after drying, noodles can be covered and stored no longer than 1 month.

 

Use these noodles for the Egg Noodles w/Sausage & Kale Recipe.

Refuge in October

Once a month, on a Wednesday (except in the summer), I make the meal for Refuge Ministries of Mexico, Missouri.  Each fall, there is a new set of faces and enthusiasm as the fifth graders from last year have moved into junior high and are now old enough to attend.  Lots of catching up to do amongst the ‘ladies in the kitchen’ from my summer hiatus.  Attendance dips a bit in the summer and I get terribly busy with farm work, so my contribution is about 8 months of the year.

The changes in some of these young peoples’ lives are subtle in some cases and drastic in others as they learn about God (Yahweh) and how He can use broken lives for His good through repentance and redemption.  For some, this weekly gathering of strong Christian volunteers are the only parental-like mentorship they have in their lives.  These volunteers are real heroes as they uplift and teach these, oftentimes, rowdy and rambunctious young people, week after week.

I’ve taken to starting the meal the day before since I get so worn out now if I try preparing all day then making the drive, serving, then drive home.  My son, Nathan and friend, Christian, leave at 4pm for Mexico, MO and return about midnight.  So, Tuesday I mixed up, rolled out, and cut 9 batches of egg noodle and stuck them in the freezer.   Since I didn’t have any sausage, I had set out 7 lbs of ground beef to thaw, then added 1/2 cup of sage, 1/4 cup black pepper, and 1/4 cup Real salt, then mixed that well (in two batches) in my Kitchenaid mixer.  Then set the whole thing in the frig overnight for the flavours to meld and it passed muster with enthusiasm, except my husband, who deemed it too ‘peppery.’  I may back off the black pepper just a bit next time.  I used spinach for my recipe today and adjusted the amounts to feed about 60 people.

Egg Noodles w/Sausage & Kale*

INGREDIENTS:

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 lb lamb or beef sausage

1/2 lb kale, tough stems and centre ribs discarded and leaves coarsely chopped

1/2 lb egg noodles

2/3 cup water

1/2 cup Parmesan cheese

DIRECTIONS: Heat oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then cook sausage, breaking up any lumps with a spoon, until browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Meanwhile, blanch kale in a 6-quart pot of boiling salted water, uncovered, 5 minutes. Remove kale with a large slotted spoon, drain over pan, and add to cooked sausage in skillet. Saute stirring frequently and scraping up any brown bits from bottom of skillet. Return cooking water in pot to boil and cook egg noodles in boiling water, uncovered, until al dente. Add noodles to skillet with a slotted spoon and 1/2 cup reserved cooking water if necessary, tossing until combined. Stir in cheese and thin with additional cooking water in desired. Serve immediately, with additional cheese on the side. Serves 6.  Lettuce or other greens can take the place of kale. Hint: Retain some of the cooking water and add to any leftovers for easier warming up. As always, use eggs (for making noodles) from pastured hens and sausage from grass-finished animals for best nutrition and flavour. Grow your own or buy the greens from your neighbour. *adapted from recipe in the March 2006 Gourmet magazine.

Egg Noodles

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups unbleached white or whole wheat flour

3 egg yolks

1 egg

2 teaspoons salt

1/4 to 1/2 cup water

DIRECTIONS:

Make a well in centre of flour. Add egg yolks, egg, and salt; mix thoroughly . Mix in water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until dough is stiff but easy to roll.  Divide dough into 4 equal parts. Roll dough, one part at a time, into nearly paper-thin rectangle on well-floured surface. Cut into narrow strips with a knife or noodle cutter.  Shake out strips and place on towel until stiff and dry, about 2 hours. Or I just drop the individual fresh noodles directly into boiling water.   Cook in 3 quarts boiling salted water (1 tablespoon salt) until tender, 12 to 15 minutes; drain. About 6 cups noodles. Storage: after drying, noodles can be covered and stored no longer than 1 month.

Use these noodles for the Egg Noodles w/Sausage & Kale Recipe.