Tag Archives: organic

Apricot Ginger “Granola” by Wheat Belly

I’m no good at sticking with the Wheat Belly diet with the exception of keeping grain out of my diet, and by default, milk, simply because even grass based, organic, real milk doesn’t agree with me and i’m not going to buy almond or coconut milk.  But i do keep this ‘granola’ made up and stored in a Ziploc Bag in the freezer – just dipping out about 1/4 cup for brecky most mornings and usually eat without milk, but sometimes 1/2 sliced organic banana.  Most of my organic nuts and seeds come from Food To Live which can be ordered directly from their website or some are available through Wal-Mart online ordering.

My version of Wheat Belly‘s Apricot Ginger “Granola”

5 dried or apricots or more likely i use prunes

1/4 cup coconut oil, melted

2 teaspoons vanilla (Mexican pure)

2 cups raw sunflower seeds

2 cups raw pumpkin seeds

1 cup chopped raw pecans

1 cup chopped raw almonds (these aren’t available in the US; mine come from Italy)

2 cups unsweetened desiccated coconut

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground allspice

NO SWEETENER (it really doesn’t need it, but you can always drizzle a bit of pure local  honey on top, then eat with a spoon).

 

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Here’s the published recipe, but above in the body of this blog entry, i’ve published the way i actually make it.

Spraying Done for this Year

One of the main projects i had planned for this year was to spray brush.  Truly had hoped to cover the entire farm, but there is just so much that between regular work and windy or rainy days – well, i did get quite a lot done actually and i’m pleased.  My focus did switch to completely covering (spot spraying) the west 160 and that was accomplished by July 1.  It is important to keep track of that date because three years from then, the farm can be used to grow certified organic crops.  Weed and brush management from now on will have to be by brush hogging and intensive grazing.  One of the ironies of ‘certified’ organic is that i can’t chemically treat individual plants even once for three years, but i could burn all the fossil fuel i want mowing them down.  But rules are rules.

So to finish the project also means to clean up and put away the tools used.  My 30 gallon spray tank and pump were purchased new at Orscheln’s this year and i hope to get several more years’ use out of it.  Their brand name is Country Tuff and it has worked flawlessly all season.  I did switch out the coiled hose for a straight one we already had – i just didn’t like the coiled one.

For the chemical, the easiest and most effective in my opinion is Crossbow.  i buy it by the case (4 gallons) at a cost of $200.46 at Butterfield & Associates Grain in Meadville, MO.  Mix half gallon to 30 gallons of water and you are ready to go.  This spring and summer, I sprayed about 1200 gallons of mixed spray.  That’s about 45 hours worth of spot spraying.

Cleaning up:

  1. drain and rinse out the tank with clean water
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This photo shows that i place a 2×4 between the tank and the edge of my Gator bed which keeps the tank from rubbing on the side and also keeps the clips that hold the sprayer wand from breaking off.
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i used a couple tarp straps around the tank to secure the tank in place.  The 3×3 inch board in front keeps other items from bumping against the tank and the motor.  (My Gator is usually full of other stuff)
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Under the motor, the draw pipe is located.  Shown here, i’ve undone the pipe from the tank and showing the screen is partially plugged.  The sprayer will operate with this little bit of stuff clogging it, but you will definitely notice a lack of spray distance.  It’s important to use clean water and keep stuff out of the tank which can clog the orifice and screen.
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I’ve cleaned the screen and replaced it.  (Yeah, i know, i need a manicure badly!)
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This tube actually had a small part of a leaf in it when i set out to clean the tank for storage.  I knew i had a lack of power and had cleaned the screen before.  I just thought maybe i had run the motor so much it was worn out.  However, i have no doubt now it was because of the leaf blocking this tube.  I’ll remember to check that next year.
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Inside the tank is the draw tube.  This is where that leaf had gotten trapped.  i’ve cleaned it out now.
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The electrical plug and wire goes from the motor and up through my Gator back window and down under the passenger seat to the battery.
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Horrible photo, but black to negative and red to positive for battery connections.
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Cleaned, drained, ready for winter storage
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Properly labeled as to what was used in this tank and when.

 

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna

Getting Ready

One would think you could just pull in and start with tillage for planting crops as part of my fescue elimination project.  Alas, that isn’t true in my case.  Since i had subdivided the 120 acres into 6 paddocks with 2 wire hi-tensile electric wire, all this had to be wound up and stowed for replacement after 4 years as per my plan.  Old fence posts and wired had to be pulled up and stacked for burning when time allows and entrance gateway had to be widened.

 

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There’s been a 16 foot gate here for longer than i’ve been alive, although this is a new gate i had installed about 5 years ago.  But, 16 foot opening is far too narrow to pull in comfortably with big equipment, although you’d be amazed at what a skilled driver can get through!
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So, this is the new look – set two new corner posts and hung two 16 foot gates.  Very professionally done by Jim Fitzgerald.
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HUGE thank you and shout out to North Central Missouri Electric Coop for quickly removing, not only the lines from the transformer to the meter pole, but also my farm lines from the meter pole to windmill pump. About an 1/4 of a mile’s worth. While i did the ground work of chaining the pole to the front end loading, Dallas pulled the posts. Afterward, i dragged them to a burn pile with my Gator.
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The electric company removed the wires from two tall poles which were on my property.  Our little tractor had to shove a bit on the pole, then really hunker down to get these poles pulled up.  As you can see, they are buried quite deep.  Instead of burning these poles, they were cut to length and used as the corner posts for my new gateways!
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Old fence left over from who knows when still across the pasture with wire buried and tangled.  What a mess but at last we prevailed.
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Here are half the posts from that fence.  These will all burnt in a pile.  Would make good firewood if they weren’t full of staples and wires.  The corner posts were too heavy for me to lift into the bucket, so we just used the tractor to pull them ’round to the burn pile – it wasn’t far.
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An old home built load out chute we drug up out of the middle of the pasture.  
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With most posts pulled up, Dallas is building me a low water crossing while I pull the remaining posts to burn pile and roll up another half a quarter mile of hi-tensile wire.  Weather is perfect for working but I’m about out of steam!

 

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I bet you were wondering how I can roll up 12 gauge hi-tensile electric wire.  The key is this spinning jenny from Powerflex Fence.  Don’t do this without a spinning jenny  Notice the rolls of wire I stored nearby; ready to roll back out after the 4 year renovation.  All told, I rolled up a bit more than 2 miles of hi-tensile wire and pulled some 140 fiberglass posts.  Many were 1 inch and were easily pulled by hand.  I hauled them all home and have them stored on a pallet in the barn.
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Here you can see the old hand strung electric line from way up at the barn down to the electrified pump.  It used to be run only with the windmill, but there is not enough reliable wind to make that very viable.  Anyway, those were the posts Dallas and I pulled up.

Dallas and I did this in a couple days of remarkable weather in November!

Cheers

tauna

Egg Drop Soup for Liquid Diet

Home made egg drop soup:  (Tan Hua T’ang)

3 cups of chicken stock broth.

1/2 teaspoon salt (use Real salt or something that is 100% salt – check the label)

3 tablespoons cold water

1 tablespoon tapioca flour (cassava)* or cornstarch

2 eggs slightly beaten (farm fresh from pastured hens is best)

Heat broth and salt to boiling.  Mix cold water and tapioca flour; stir gradually into broth.  Boil and stir 1 minutes.  Slowly pour eggs into broth stirring constantly with fork, to form shreds of egg.  Remove from heat; stir slowly once or twice.

You can also make this without thickening it with the tapioca flour or cornstarch if it needs to be absolutely thin liquid.

For best medicine, you need to find a local farmer from whom you can purchase healthy pasture raised spent hens or broilers.  You may have to butcher them yourself.  Cook them down bones and all, pull off the meat bits, then throw the bones and cartilage back into the water and simmer another hour or so.  The goal is to get as much of the chondroitan out of the cartilage and minerals out of the bones and into your broth.  Once done, strain out the bones and let the broth cool.  Chicken fat is quite soft, so if you want to skim it off, you’ll eventually have to put it in the frig or other cool spot so that it will harden on the top of the broth so that you can remove it with a slotted spoon.

Buying chicken broth in the store is NOT the same product as what you are making here.

As always, find certified organic or organically raised ingredients.

This was a big hit with my father-in-law who is recovering from hernia surgery, is very weak, and really doesn’t have an appetite.

However, it’s quite good even if you aren’t sick or in recovery.

Cheers

tauna

*my friend Francoirse raises cassava in DRC!

Find a local producer near you using a handy website search, here are a few:

Localdirt.com

Eatwild.com

Localharvest.org

 

Warm Banana Milk Drink

A friend from Manitoba, Canada posted a link on facebook to a recipe that gave me the idea of combining two of my father-in-law’s favourite foods; bananas and milk, and so i tried.  He LOVED it!

2 cups of milk

1 banana (unmashed)

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon powder

Bring the milk and banana to just past warm – don’t really want it to boil or it gets a funny sour taste.  Some don’t mind that though. Put a lid on the pot and let it heat through and simmer 10-15 minutes.  Remove the banana or pour through a sieve or cheesecloth into heat proof jar like a canning jar.  Add the cinnamon powder, but don’t shake a jar with hot liquid, it’ll spew out from under the cap.  Stir the cinnamon in when you are ready to enjoy.

Remember, i use canning jars with screw on one-piece lids to make the transport of broth, soups, and drinks easier.

This is another of the liquid diet recipes for helping my father-in-law heal from surgery, so use all organic ingredients (even if the banana comes from Colombia) including raw milk from your neighbour’s grassfed dairy.

Enjoy!

tauna

 

 

 

Banana Pudding

Recipes for soft or liquid diet – high calorie and yummy!

1 well mashed banana (i used the one left over from making a banana milk drink)

2 cups milk

1/3 cup honey

1/3 cup sugar

2 tablespoons cassava flour (tapioca flour)

1/8 tsp salt

4 egg yolks

1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix together in a saucepan banana, milk, sugar (and/or honey), tapioca flour, and salt.  Whisk while heating through about 3 minutes.   Pour about 1 cup of the hot mixture into the egg yolks and mix thoroughly, then add that back to the saucepan, whisking always another couple minutes.  Remove from low heat and whisk in the vanilla.  Pour into a heat tolerate container for cooling.  If you want to avoid the skim that forms on the top of pudding, then you can lay a piece of plastic wrap right on top of the pudding.  Should be set in a couple hours, but good to eat anytime.

The recipes I’m posting are for people who need or want top notch health, so all ingredients used are organically raised, preferably local as well.  The milk is from neighbours who specialise in cows whose diet is primarily grass or dried forages (hay or stockpiled grass in winter).   Honey is locally sourced and does not contain corn syrup, sugar is organically grown and harvested in the USA.  Not sure on the cassava flour, although the label says it is certified organic.  Eggs are from our own hens or the young lady who raises hens next door.  Bananas certified organic from the store which cites them having been grown in Colombia.  Are there any bananas grown in the USA?

Bear in mind that using cassava to thicken gravies, puddings, stir fry will give a significantly different sort of viscosity than cornstarch – that’s okay.  So far, Cassava is not genetically modified whereas corn is almost 100% GMO.

After setting – i notice that this recipe is less ‘stiff’ than what one normally expects pudding to be.  I’m guessing that has to do with the honey.  Just use 2/3rds cup of sugar if you like more traditional thickness.  Also, realise that using the cassava will likely be lumpier than using cornstarch.

Cheers!

tauna

If you try this one, let me know how it turns out for you!  banana pudding 002.JPG

Food Waste in the UK

Speak boldly  Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall!

From BBC News Magazine

Viewpoint: The rejected vegetables that aren’t even wonky

There is little doubt this situation is just as bad in the US and around the world.  Yet the big food companies (not food producers) tell us we’ll all starve if we don’t buy their products to produce more food.  It’s a pack of lies.  We waste far too much food.  What we have is a distribution problem and in the first world countries we have so much food that we are incredibly picky.

Food waste is a subject i feel is important – as a cattle rancher and mom, i hear a lot of people complain (in the US) about the high cost of food, yet most producers (meats, eggs, chicken, vegetables, fruit) barely scrape out a living.  The facts are that the cost of production continues to skyrocket, yet, by and large, the producer’s income has remained stagnant while the consumer’s cost has risen only a little.  The margins are very thin and oftentimes only the much aligned farm subsidies provided by the govt are the difference between going another year and losing the farm.  We could utilise our resources much more efficiently and produce a great deal more foodstuffs.  But there is no reason to do so.  Food is so cheap, we would simply lose money.

That huge pile of parsnips that Mr Fearnly-Whittingstall is standing in front of could consumed by cattle or sheep or just returned to the soil to be ploughed back in, but will it?  For sure, the food you throw into your bin at home will go only to the landfill.

Okay, i’ll step off my soapbox now!  😉

Cheers!

tauna

BBC magazine supermarketveg