Tag Archives: sea salt

Baking Powder Biscuits

My go to recipe for quick biscuits and beef (or lamb) sausage gravy.

Baking Powder Biscuits

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/2 cup softened butter
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 cup milk

DIRECTIONS
Heat oven to 450 degrees. Cut butter into flour, sugar, baking powder and salt with pastry blender (or by hand) until mixture resembles fine crumbs. Stir in milk (don’t add in all at once) until dough leaves sides of bowl (dough will be soft and sticky). Turn dough onto lightly floured surface. Knead lightly 10 times. Roll or pat ½ inch thick. Cut with floured 2 ½ inch round cutter. Place on ungreased cookie sheet about 1 inch apart for crusty sides, touching for soft sides. Bake until golden brown for 10-12 minutes. One dozen biscuits. If using self-rising flour, omit baking powder and salt.

Exciting discovery!!

Today, i tried my 10.25 inch cast iron skillet (Lodge – made in the USA).  Place skillet in oven whilst it is preheating to 450°F.  Roll out and cut 7 biscuits and place in skillet.  Bake uncovered for 10 minutes.

So easy!

Baking Powder Biscuits
Baking Powder Biscuits baked in iron skillet.

Deviled Eggs – Newest Recipe

In my quest to use more local and less processed ingredients in making meals, I’ve updated my previous deviled egg recipe with this one which does not need Worcestershire sauce or Bragg’s Amino Liquid.  There is too much soy in our lives and there is no need for it.  Especially given the proliferation of genetically engineered soybeans.

Deviled Eggs

Ingredients:

  • 12 large eggs (hard cooked)*
  • 4 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoons black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Directions:

Peel hard cooked eggs, slice in half lengthwise and remove yolk to food processor or mixer (or smash by hand with a fork).  Place the egg white halves on a plate or special deviled egg plate or container.  Smash the yolks to fine pieces and remove to a bowl, then add the remaining ingredients mixing thoroughly.

You can then spoon a bit of the yolk mixture into each egg white half or use a pastry tube for a more decorative look.  Cover, refrigerate and use withing a couple days.

Clearly, i don’t have all the ingredients local – we cannot grow lemon trees in our north Missouri, Hardiness Zone 5B.  (Find your hardiness zone here at Stark Bros Nursery.)  So, i’m sure looking for suggestions for a suitable replacement.  Salt and pepper is also a work in progress.

*Tips:  Remember to use 7-10 day old eggs for easier peeling.  Allow them to come to room temperature before cooking.  Place in a pan and just cover with water, place on a lid, then bring to a boil, turn off the heat and let stand in hot water for at least 20 minutes.  Drain and cool before peeling.

My Homemade Mayonnaise

Using the directions from Fail-Proof Mayonnaise, then modifying the ingredients, I’ve decided on the recipe for us.
Ingredients:

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon mustard (Dijon, yellow, or whatever you like)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon sea salt (we prefer 1/2 tsp)
  • 1 cup oil*

Directions:

Put the first four ingredients in a blender or food processor and start processing, then while the blender is mixing, slowly, very slowly – take at least a minute – pour in the oil.  By the time the oil is completely poured in, the mayonnaise should be thickened and ready to serve.

Remember!  this recipe has no preservatives, it will keep about 5 days in the frig.

* i don’t care for the taste of extra virgin olive oil, but you might.  Right now, i’ve settled on grapeseed oil, but i have yet to try raw walnut, pecan, or sunflower oils.

Also, i don’t use vinegar because it doesn’t need it and my father-in-law is allergic to it anyway.

Now you are ready to make deviled eggs, tuna, beef, or chicken salad, mix with a bit of milk and spices for health ranch dressing, or spread on your favorite sandwich.

Tuna and Egg Salad
Tuna and Egg Salad

 

 

Fail-Proof Mayonnaise

There is so much junk in commercial mayonnaise, that it’s really become a journey and conviction to get into the habit of making my own.  We really use very little anyway and we have oodles of eggs from our own grazing hens, so there is no excuse.

I found this recipe online called Fail-Proof Homemade Mayonnaise and so for, for me it has been.  I’ve made it with EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) and grapeseed oil.  My goal is to make it as local as possible, so my next try will be with sunflower oil which i’ve sourced from a Kansas farm family.  (be aware that some oils are extracted using chemicals and petroleum products – find first press)

Fail-Proof Homemade Mayonnaise

How to make mayonnaise in less than 10 minutes! Using whole eggs instead of just the yolk, makes this homemade mayonnaise recipe practically fail-proof and extra easy. Jump to the Whole Egg Mayonnaise Recipe or watch our quick video to see how we make the tastiest and easiest mayonnaise from scratch!

Watch Us Make Mayonnaise

Why You Should Make Mayonnaise At Home

I’ve used this mayonnaise recipe more times than I can count. If you’ve never tried homemade mayonnaise, then you are in for a treat. Homemade mayo is ultra creamy and so much more flavorful than anything you can buy at the store. Here’s why I love this recipe so much:

  • Our recipe uses whole eggs instead of just the yolks so you can skip separating the eggs.
  • The remaining ingredients are simple and very likely in your kitchen right now.
  • The whole process takes less than 10 minutes.
  • You can add extra ingredients for more flavor (like roasted garlic or herbs). I’ve shared suggestions below.

Mayonnaise Ingredients

The ingredients to make mayo are simple — we bet you even have them in your kitchen right now. You will need the following:

Egg — You need to use egg to make mayonnaise. We do use raw egg in the recipe. Personally, I don’t have an issue adding raw egg to the recipe, but if you are concerned about eating raw eggs, buy pasteurized eggs. They are sold in the egg section of the grocery store. You can also pasteurize eggs yourself, just search for a tutorial online.

Mustard — I know that not everyone loves the flavor of mustard, but when it comes to making homemade mayonnaise mustard is sort of a magical ingredient. Mustard adds a bit of flavor, but it also helps to keep the mayonnaise stable. Along with the egg yolk, mustard helps emulsify the mixture, reducing the risk of our mayo breaking.

Vinegar or lemon juice — Not only does a little acid like wine vinegar, champagne vinegar, and lemon juice add incredible flavor to the mayonnaise, it also helps to stabilize the mixture.

Neutral Flavored Oil — By neutral flavored oil, I mean use an oil that is light in flavor. Quite a bit of oil is added to make mayonnaise, so it’s important to like the flavor of the oil you use. For a clean tasting mayonnaise use something like grape seed, safflower, avocado or canola oil. Since posting the recipe, quite a few readers have asked about olive oil in mayonnaise. You can use olive oil, but it can be a little overpowering so I prefer to use a brand that’s light and fruity. I think robust or spicy olive oils would be too much. You might also consider only replacing half of the oil called for in the recipe with olive oil and use something more neutral for the rest.

How to make mayonnaise in less than 10 minutes! Using whole eggs instead of just the yolk, makes this homemade mayonnaise recipe practically fail-proof and extra easy.

Let Me Show You How To Make Mayonnaise, You’ve Got This!

There are a few ways to make mayonnaise. We use our food processor with the small bowl attachment, but an immersion blender or making it completely by hand will work. (Expect tired arms and strong biceps if you do choose to do it by hand.)

Room temperature ingredients are best when making mayonnaise at home. If you’re not able to wait for the egg to come to room temperature, submerge it in lukewarm (not hot) water for a couple of minutes.

The Five Steps For Making Mayonnaise

Prepare your food processor. I prefer to use the small bowl attachment that came with our food processor to make mayonnaise.

Add an egg to the bowl of your food processor and process for about 20 seconds.

Add mustard, vinegar, and salt then process for another 20 seconds.

Slowly add the oil, in tiny drops, until about a quarter of the oil has been added. Adding the oil slowly is really important. If you were to dump it all in at once, you’d have mayonnaise soup!

Taste the mayonnaise and adjust with additional salt and vinegar or lemon juice.

Stream the oil in slowly
For the best mayonnaise results, add the oil slowly very slowly.
Homemade Mayo
The mayonnaise is done! Thick and so creamy.

Mayonnaise Variations

I love this classic mayonnaise as-is, but love it even more when I make it my own. I almost always add a squeeze of lemon juice to brighten things up a little. I love how fresh it makes it taste. Fresh herbs, roasted garlic, chipotle, Sriracha or curry powder are all amazing options, as well.

How to Fix Broken Mayonnaise

When making mayonnaise, the worst, but not unfixable, thing that can happen to you is that the mixture breaks, leaving you with a curdled mess. The recipe we’ve shared tries to prevent this a few ways: we use a whole egg, which adds a little more liquid to the mix, mustard acts as an emulsifier from the get-go and we are careful to stream our oil in slowly. While we have never had this particular recipe for mayonnaise break on us, if it happens to you don’t fret! You really should be able to fix it.

To fix broken mayonnaise, add about 1 teaspoon of mustard to a bowl then use a whisk to slowly beat the broken mayonnaise, bit by bit, into the mustard until it becomes emulsified and creamy again.

Another trick is to add an egg yolk to a large bowl and slowly use a whisk to beat the broken mayo, bit by bit, into the yolk.

Homemade Whole Egg Mayonnaise Recipe

Frequently Asked Questions

Since posting this recipe for mayonnaise, a few frequently asked questions have come up, so I’m going to do my best to answer them here:

Do I have to use raw eggs to make mayonnaise? Eggs are essential for making mayonnaise. Risks of using raw eggs are low, but there is a chance that the egg contains a germ called Salmonella. Personally, I am not too concerned about this, but here’s what the CDC suggests you do to reduce the risks of using eggs:

  • Consider buying and using pasteurized eggs
  • Keep eggs refrigerated at 40°F (4°C) or colder at all times.
  • Only buy eggs from stores and suppliers that keep them refrigerated.
  • Discard cracked or dirty eggs.

Do I need to use mustard? You can make homemade mayonnaise without mustard, but remember that mustard is one of the fail-safes we have added to our recipe to encourage an emulsification.

Can I use olive oil to make mayo? Yes, but keep in mind that quite a bit of oil is called for in the recipe so a strong or robust flavored oil will make the mayonnaise strong in flavor. When I use olive oil, I like using a light, fruity brand and only replace half of the oil with olive oil and use a neutral flavored oil for the remaining oil.

My mayonnaise won’t thicken, what am I doing wrong? Ugh, I’m sorry! Broken mayonnaise happens to everyone and it doesn’t necessarily mean that you did something wrong or that the recipe you used was a bad one. The key thing to keep in mind when making mayo is to add that oil slowly and by slowly, I honestly mean to add it drop by drop. I know it seems extreme, but it’s the best way to ensure creamy mayo. Mayonnaise can be finicky so if it breaks on you or it just doesn’t thicken, there are some things you can do to fix it. Take a look above in the article where I outline a couple of fixes to broken mayo.

How long does homemade mayonnaise last? Here’s the thing, homemade mayo will last as long as your eggs would have lasted. A good rule of thumb is that mayo will keep covered in the fridge up to a week, but you might find that it lasts a little longer depending on the freshness of your eggs.

Delicious Ways To Use Homemade Mayonnaise

Recipe updated, originally posted May 2015. Since posting this in 2015, we have tweaked the recipe to be more clear and have added a recipe video. – Adam and Joanne

Fail-Proof Homemade Mayonnaise

  • PREP 
  • TOTAL 

Homemade mayonnaise is such a treat. It’s very simple to make, too. Room temperature ingredients are best when making mayonnaise at home. If you’re not able to wait for the egg to come to room temperature, submerge it in lukewarm (not hot) water for a couple of minutes. There are a few ways to make mayonnaise. We use our food processor with the small bowl attachment, but an immersion blender or making it completely by hand and large whisk will work. (Expect tired arms and strong biceps if you do choose to do it by hand).

Makes approximately 1 cup

YOU WILL NEED

1 large egg at room temperature

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon red or white wine vinegar

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste

1 cup (240 ml) neutral flavored oil, grapeseed, safflower or canola are best

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice, optional

DIRECTIONS

    • PREPARE EQUIPMENT

If you have a large food processor, use the smaller bowl attachment that came with your processor so that the bowl is not too large for the amount of mayonnaise this recipe makes. Not using the smaller bowl can prevent the mayonnaise from emulsifying since the mixture will not have enough contact with the blade.

If you do not the smaller bowl attachment, making the mayonnaise with an immersion blender or by hand are alternatives. Or simply make a larger batch and double the recipe and use the standard bowl attachment.

      • MAKE MAYONNAISE

Add egg to the small bowl of a food processor and process for 20 seconds. Add the mustard, vinegar, and salt. Process for another 20 seconds.

Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl, turn the food processor on then begin to slowly add the oil in tiny drops until about a quarter of the oil has been added (this is critical for proper emulsification).

When you notice that the mixture is beginning to thicken and emulsify, you can be a little less strict. With the processor on, continue to add it slowly, but increase to a very thin stream instead of drops of oil.

When all of the oil has been added, scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl and process for an extra 10 seconds. Taste mayonnaise for seasoning then add salt, lemon juice or extra vinegar to taste.

Note, if the mayo seems too thin, slowly stream in more oil with the processor running until thick.

ADAM AND JOANNE’S TIPS

  • Storing Homemade Mayonnaise: Store covered in the refrigerator up to a week.
  • Raw eggs: When choosing eggs for homemade mayonnaise, go for fresh, properly refrigerated, clean grade A or AA eggs with intact shells.
  • Olive oil: Olive oil can be a little overpowering so use one that’s light and fruity and consider only replacing half of the oil called for in the recipe with olive oil and use something more neutral for the rest.
  • Fixing Broken Mayonnaise: While we have never had this recipe for mayonnaise break on us, if it happens to you don’t fret! You really should be able to fix it. Add about 1 teaspoon of mustard to a bowl then slowly beat the broken mayonnaise into the mustard until it becomes emulsified and creamy again (a tip from Julia Child). Another trick is to repeat the same process, but replace the teaspoon of mustard with an egg yolk.
  • Nutrition facts: The nutrition facts provided below are estimates. We have used the USDA Supertracker recipe calculator to calculate approximate values. 1 serving equals 1 tablespoon.

If you make this recipe, snap a photo and hashtag it #inspiredtaste — We love to see your creations on Instagram and Facebook! Find us: @inspiredtaste

NUTRITION PER SERVING: Serving Size 1 tablespoon / Calories 126 / Protein 0 g / Carbohydrate 0 g / Dietary Fiber 0 g / Total Sugars 0 g / Total Fat 14 g / Saturated Fat 1 g / Cholesterol 12 mg
AUTHOR: Adam and Joanne Gallagher

Mashed “Potatoes”

As I wind up the last day of my Wheat Belly 10-day detox, I’ll share another basic yet tasty recipe from Dr William Davis.

Mashed “Potatoes”     (makes 4 servings)

  1. 1 large head cauliflower
  2. 1/4 cup canned coconut milk (i use raw milk from grassfed cows)
  3. 2 tablespoons butter (from the same cows, but you could replace this with olive oil)
  4. 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  5. Ground black pepper to taste

Place a steamer basket in a large pot with 2″ of water.  Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium. Place the cauliflower in the basket, cover, and steam for 15 to 20 minutes, or until tender.

Remove from heat and drain.  In a blender, food processor, or food chopper, combine the cauliflower, milk, butter, salt, and pepper.  Blend or process until smooth

Per serving:  131 calories, 4 g protein, 11 g carbohydrates, 9 g total fat, 6 g saturated fat, 4 g fiber, 214 mg sodium.

Dr Davis provides these additional notes regarding this recipe:

Although not a grain, potatoes yield too many carbohydrates when cooked.  This is a problem in your 10-Day Detox because excessive carbohydrates turn off your capacity to lose weight by triggering blood sugar and insulin to high levels.  Rather than simply subtracting another common staple from your dinner table, here is a way to not just replace mashed potatoes, but to create something that tastes even better, but with none of the problems.  Replace butter with extra-virgin olive oil for a dairy-free version.

Here’s to feeling great!

tauna

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Wash a head of cauliflower.
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With a sharp knife, cut away the stem and leaves of the cauliflower head.
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Don’t throw away those leaves and stem!  Save them all for later chopping for soup, casserole, lumpia.  The leaves have a tangy, crisp taste.
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The recipe calls for separating into florets, but i really didn’t find that necessary.
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Place the steamer basket and cauliflower in pot for steaming.
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Cover and steam 15-20 minutes.  Oh good grief, i got myself in the lid.
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For my family, I cut the head in half because we just don’t need so much.  One half, i will save for later to serve with melted sharper cheddar over top.
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After the cauliflower has cooled slightly, I process the cauliflower in my ancient food processor and add the remaining ingredients.
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Mashed “potatoes”
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Served with fresh green salad mix and a grilled grassfed ground beef burger from our own herd. (this one is actually from that bull!)  And a small piece of Wheat Belly Herbed Focaccia bread.
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A couple days later, I was going to make soup, so i whirred up those leaves and stems.

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Wheat Belly Pizza

My version:

2 1/2 cup almond meal/flour

 

1/4 cup ground flaxseeds

1 teaspoon onion or garlic powder

2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese – divided

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

2 large farm eggs

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup water (may not need this much)

8-10 ounces of grass finished ground beef or lamb or home made beef or lamb sausage

1 cup pizza sauce

Optional ingredients i usually add:  sliced black olives and sliced fresh mushrooms, extra cheese

Preheat the oven to 350°F .

Use a Ninja Blender (mine is called a Fit Blender i believe) or some other type.

In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, pumpkin, sesame flour, ground flax seed, 1 cup of the mozzarella cheese, onion powder, and sea salt.  Mix well.  Then i add the two large eggs, 1/4 cup olive oil, and the water.  Mix and combine thoroughly.

Butter a 10″ x 15″ pan (i use a stone jelly roll pan).  Place the dough on the pan, then spread the dough by hand.  You may have to keep your fingers wet using olive oil or water to keep it from sticking to your hands.

Bake for 20 minutes.

When you are ready, spread the pizza sauce, i sprinkle some Parmesan cheese if i have any, but usually i don’t, so i use some shredded raw cheddar or whatever i have on hand.  Then crumble the cooked meat on top of that followed by optional olives and/or fresh mushrooms.  Top with remaining mozzarella or other cheese.  Bake for another 12 minutes.

Cut into about 12 pieces; this is very filling.  One piece may fill you right up!

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Wheat Belly 10 day detox book

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Spatchcock a Chicken?!

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Start with a fresh or frozen pastured (preferably) broiler.  Using scissors, cut out out the backbone.

 

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Cut backbone out completely – this is easier than it looks.  The WSJ recipe says to use the backbone to make broth or discard – DISCARD!  what?!  no way.  Make broth. Using it to make egg drop soup.
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Turn the bird over and smash down breaking breast bone so that the carcass lays fairly flat.

 

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Smashed and ready for rub.
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Rubbed in seasoning of 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon salt (i used Hebridean Sea Salt Flakes harvested from the shores of the remote Scottish Hebridean Isle of Lewis), and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper.
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Heat 3 tablespoons olive oil in a heavy skillet then place chicken breast side down.  The recipe i used said on medium high heat for 20 minutes, but thankfully i checked this at 12 minutes and it was a bit too brown.  Perhaps using a cast iron skillet made the difference since they hold heat so well.  Next time, i plan to use medium heat for 12 minutes.
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Place aluminum covered bricks on top of chicken to press it down.  I didn’t have any bricks covered, so my improvisation was to lay the cast iron lid upside down, then stack a couple smaller skillets on top for added weight.  Do this for both sides of the chicken.
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Using tongs, flip the chicken over and weight down again, reduce heat to medium low and cook another 15 minutes or so.  This shows needing a bit more time.
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Crispy and done all the way through, including the thick breast meats.  My family really liked it.  So easy, too!

 

Spatchcock a Chicken Recipe
Here are the original instructions as found in Wall Street Journal some years ago.

Cheers!

tauna