Tag Archives: skills

Craft Supplies

For whatever reason, public school teachers seem to need to buy supplies for their classes each year, using money from their own pockets.  I won’t comment on that being right or wrong or even why because i simply don’t know.  However, we as home educators, really can’t afford to purchase extraneous supplies, so we are careful to collect and use free stuff for educational supplies.  When possible, we purchase secondhand textbooks and use them for all the children in the family.  Or we share with other families whose children may be similar in age, but offset just a bit.  (Currently, Missouri public education is funded by taxpayers at the rate of $10,457 per student per year).  Since i have three children – had that been sent to me, i could have managed nicely on $31,371 per year!

Missouri Statistics by district

Linn County R-I School District

Name: Linn County R-I School District
City: Purdin
Average Daily Attendance: 220.8
Expenditure per Pupil: $11,343.44
Local, Percent of Expenditure: 43.89%
Local, Contribution in Dollars per Pupil:$4,978.31
State, Percent of Expenditure: 46.54%
State, Contribution in Dollars per Pupil: $5,279.22
Federal, Percent of Expenditure: 9.57%
Federal, Contribution in Dollars per Pupil: $1,085.91

Brookfield R-III School District

Name: Brookfield R-III School District
City: Brookfield
Average Daily Attendance: 968.3
Expenditure per Pupil: $9,569.70
Local, Percent of Expenditure: 44.99%
Local, Contribution in Dollars per Pupil:$4,305.84
State, Percent of Expenditure: 43.91%
State, Contribution in Dollars per Pupil: $4,202.25
Federal, Percent of Expenditure: 11.09%
Federal, Contribution in Dollars per Pupil: $1,061.61

To that end, i have on hand various supplies that have been given to me or sent in the mail (we get a bunch of return addresses from outfits asking for donations and typically there are fun stickers and parts of the address that can be cut for stickers.)  Gifts that have been given to us (or i unapologetically collect tissue and paper from bridal showers or birthday parties that would have just been thrown away).  Coloured tissue paper is so fun for tearing into shapes (think Eric Carle) and making books.  Also, fun to fold and tie to make flowers, etc.

Coloured paper from flyers in the mail can be cut into strips to make decorative chains.

Making books involves math skills (ie: fold paper in half, one fourth), large and small motor skills (folding, tearing, punching holes, gluing, drawing, etc), sharing and helping (work in groups), creativity (develop story telling skills, logical and chronological thinking, and how to express ideas in picture and words), understanding relations (large and small, tall and short, etc), shapes, colours.  Goodness, so many skills in just one fun activity.  At the end, have each child read and show their creation to encourage public speaking and reading skills.

There are a multitude of craft and art activities that can be expanded to teach nearly all aspects of education.

Time is the most important investment in the education and training of your children.

Ask for, gather, then develop a plan using those free supplies.  Wow, you can even then teach the importance of repurposing, recycling, reducing.

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Some of this is brand new that was given to me but i have no use for so it needs to be in the hands of someone who can educate and encourage children.  Not shown is an envelope of stickers that i cut out of the Arbor Day return address labels that were sent in the mail.  

 

 

Productive & Organized at Work

ZipRecruiter author Kaila Kea offers these five tips to be productive and organized at work.

It is no secret that being productive and organized at work leads to positive professional outcomes. Being organized and productive can help you feel less stress and greater satisfaction at work. Increased efficiency and better communication are just two of the positive side effects of employing organization skills in the workplace.

While you must find a system that works for you, there are some strategies that can help anyone become more organized and productive.

We have put together 5 top organization skills that will enable you to increase efficiency, maximize your workspace, effectively use information, and employ timely communication skills.

  1. Use Your Time Wisely.

The importance of time management cannot be overstated. Time is the one resource that cannot be replenished, so it is best to use it wisely.

Improve your time management by setting reminders. Technology makes setting reminders easier than ever! Between phone alarms, calendar reminders, and smartwatch cues, we can effectively manage our time. In addition to this, note and prioritize your goals, eliminate distractions, and say “no” when necessary.

Read more about the importance of time management here.

  1. Write it Down.

Writing notes is one of the best ways to be organized and productive. Mueller and Oppenheimer’s classic study indicated that writing requires the processing and rephrasing of information, which makes a lasting impression on the notetaker’s memory. This results in an increased ability to recall what is required of you to be productive for the day.

Keep a calendar, planner, notebook, or set of post-it notes along with plenty of writing utensils in your workspace. When an important commitment is brought to your attention, you will have what you need to record it. Keep notes that are brief, detailed, and legible to help you stay organized.

  1. Work Ahead of Schedule.  

Why work up to the deadline when you can work ahead of schedule? Use this form of time management to set gradual deadlines that are at least three to five days earlier than the official deadline. This aids in being more productive and avoids last-minute communication with colleagues about tasks that require immediate attention.

If you need to respond to pending inquiries in your inbox by close of business, set your deadline just before lunch. Or, if you must submit your contribution to a team project by Friday, set your planning tools to remind you to meet gradual deadlines then aim to submit it a day early. The key to getting better at working ahead of schedule is viewing your final deadline as a last resort. Instead of working up until the very last minute, work toward an earlier deadline that gives you space to walk away from your work and return to it later to apply finishing touches.

  1. Keep a Clear Workspace.

The space in which you work affects how you work. Working in an orderly space will help you reduce distraction and keep a clear head and keep track of all your notes and calendars. You can extend this idea to your digital workspace. Just a physical files on your desk will hinder your productivity, so will stray files on your computer desktop or having tabs open that you don’t need to look at. Taking a little time each day to do some basic housekeeping will help you stay organized, productive, and on task.

  1. Customize Your Approach.

For maximum efficiency, customize your approach to work for you and the way you operate. Some people organize assignments according to the order in which they are due while others tackle tasks in order of difficulty.

To customize your approach, consider the ways you work best一do you fare better with visuals, words, or a combination of both? Perhaps you are more audial and would benefit from leaving voice notes for yourself or listening to soothing sounds while you work. You can do some trial and error and be mindful of what helps you work best.


Written by Kaila Kea.

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