Tag Archives: time

Tidiness Tips

  1. Make your bed, hang up your clothes, shut closet door, drawers, straighten rug
  2. If you take it out, put it away – where it belongs!
  3. If you make a mess – clean it up.
  4. When you get out of the car – take all your stuff and rubbish with you.
  5. Deal with paper that comes into your house daily – mostly rubbish usually – which means deep six it immediately – no piling.
  6. Wash the dishes, let dry, put them away along with the drain rack.  Clean and shine sink/faucet/handles.
  7. Clear and wipe counters, sinks, back splash, faucets every day.  Just takes a moment – just do it.
  8. Keep laundry current – when hamper is full – wash the clothes, dry or hang them to dry.  Fold them and put away.  Consider washing a load everyday.
  9. Throw away things that don’t work, give away or sell things you don’t use.
  10. Some tasks simply take time and need doing at least once a week.  Cleaning showers, bathtubs, toilets, vacuuming or washing floors, dusting ceilings, washing walls, windows, sills.  Some prefer scheduling the same time each week to do all or choose one or more to do each day until it’s all done.
  11. Consider carefully whether or not you need more storage units or shelves vs just getting rid of extra stuff.  Less stuff; less to clean.

 

Benefits:

  1. Company can drop in and you won’t be embarrassed or feel the need to apologise for filth.
  2. Having to unload papers and junk from a chair to allow a guest to be seated or clearing papers from the dining table or washing it off before serving puts your guests at odds with feeling welcome – already they feel guilty for causing you extra work on their behalf.
  3. Clean and organised eliminates the stress caused by a chaotic environment.
  4. Putting things away saves time in looking for ‘lost’ items.  “A place for everything and everything in its place.”
  5. Cleaning and keeping things clean often increases its useful life in addition to it looking nice during its life in your home or property.
  6. Being clutter free and organised saves time/money/health.

 

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I’m not a fan of buying shelving or other storage units – usually that just means i’ve got too much stuff.  However, when renovating our old house and enduring NO shelves in the lower cupboards, after 3 years, i finally relented to purchasing this nice inexpensive unit and now, finding stuff is oh such joy!  This is actually called a 2-tier shoe rack, but works perfectly in this space for my needs.  

What are your tips for keeping your house, job, and life neat and tidy?  What are your challenges?

Cheers!

tauna

 

Greatness, Time, and Wisdom

For the reflective and thinking person…..

Enter Wonderland

Image credit: Annca, source (edited by author)


Author’s note: Following a series of life events which conspired to prevent me from writing, I’m finally publishing the remaining stories from last year’s trip, as well as more recent writings which have never been released.  Thank you for your patience, and enjoy the ride!

There’s a story in David Batstone’s book Not for Sale about a woman who works in rural Thailand to rescue children from the slave trade.  It’s a powerful, moving tale as she boldly goes into situations where she is not wanted in order to rescue them, and it left me wondering.  You see, almost no one outside of those who have read the book and she knew directly will ever hear about her.  Yet how great is the work that she does?  Almost all of us would agree that she is having a tremendous impact on the world…

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The Big Till

As a first step of my endophyte infected fescue eradication and pasture renovation project, today was the big day of tillage.  My husband had purchased a Howard Rotavator 600, which is 10 foot wide sod-cutting and chewing machine and the soil (actually just dirt, it’s in pathetic condition) it’s been through gave it a real workout.  Even the tractor couldn’t keep up and i had to sidle over and only take 2′-5′ bite of new sod at times, especially going up hill.  This first pass took place on May 17-18, 2017.

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Here my husband has been running the equipment to make sure everything was working.  I’m getting ready for my dual.  Operating new equipment is always an uneasy step for me!
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The ‘soil’ more like dirt because it’s so dead is very compacted and lots of clay making for a lot of overlapping.  I even killed the tractor a couple times because there was simply not enough power to pull the machine.  I quickly learnt how much ‘bite’ the machinery could take so the John Deere 4250 would not be overwhelmed.
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The Howard Rotavator 600.  Here’s a link to a video of the rotavator in operation.
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My soil hasn’t been tilled since at least the early 1960’s.  It’s compacted with little to no life in it.  Just dirt.  The  hope is to allow water and other nutrient infiltration to encourage forage growth.  This is an example of first pass.

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One pass tillage next to existing stand of grass.  Serious clay content.  Methinks some of this worked up harder than if i took down the gravel road!

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Plenty of big rocks (these are some of the smaller ones) to make the machine go ‘klunk’!
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My office for a total of 8 hours.  Allen ran it for about 4 hours. 

All in all, i mapped out about 18 acres actually tilled.  There are about 25 acres total in the area being renovated, however, because of the steep slopes, several acres are left alone to serve as grassy waterways.  I wonder, however, as hard as the ground is, if the tilled portions won’t actually hold and stop more water than the hard pan waterways.  Hmmm.

So far, 12 hours spent (1.5 acres per hour) tilling, but not counting time servicing tractor and machine or time spent getting to/from the farm.  Tractor uses about 7.7 gallons diesel fuel per hour, so 92.5 gallons there.  Second pass should take a bit less time, but we’ll see!

We received a big storm last night with about an inch of rain, so the second pass won’t happen for a few days – depending on weather.  Allen will be right behind the second rotatiller pass with the Einbach harrow/seeder and my selected annual grass mix.

Per acre healing forages:

  1.  6 lbs buckwheat
  2.  6 lbs lespedeza
  3.  3 lbs pearl millet
  4. 12 lbs oats
  5.  6 lbs cowpeas
  6.  5 lbs sunflower
  7.  2 lbs red clover

These were chosen for their prolification, adaptability to poor soils, nitrogen fixing, and low cost as well as providing excellent grazing in 60-75 days.

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Grass waterways left to slow water during rains until the rest has forage established.
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Not a clear photograph, but a better idea of leaving waterways.
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On the far slope, the rows would have been so short that a lot of time would have been spent just turning around, so i chose to strip till through and across low and high spots.  Time will tell if that was the right decision.
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View from my office. 😉

Time Management Lesson

Too many times I engage in projects which end up as time wasted. Case in point this 12×12 chicken tractor. After spending time and money on it, I’m now faced with more time wasted disassembling it. I have no intention of raising layers on pasture again and it’s too awkward to move very far and a waste of space to store it. The high quality tarp from Troyer Tarp will be stored, however, since it is a $100 item. I’m learning, albeit slowly and with the wisdom my children bestow upon me, to utilize my time more wisely.

Cheers!

tauna

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“Not-To-Do” List

Here is another thought from Burke Teichert, a man whom I’ve yet to meet, who has words of wisdom and experience worth pondering taken from his column “Strategic Planning for the Ranch” in Beef magazine.

“We can all think of things we used to do.  We quit doing them because we discovered they were not necessary –often long after they’d ceased to be necessary, if they were ever necessary in the first place.  I’ll guarantee most of us are still doing things that don’t need to be done, but cost us time and money.”

Burke Teichert, a consultant on strategic planning for ranches, retired in 2010 as vice president and general manager of AgReserves Inc.  He resides in Orem, Utah.  Contact him at burketei@comcast.com

What are some things you do that are time wasters?  I know i have some, but it seems like they come from poor planning rather than day to day wasting (although this blog may easily fall into that category, but I am hoping it will build into a business someday).  Questions i ask myself:  What am i doing right now?  Is it costing me time and money? or is it a good investment for my time and money?  If it is a cost, why am I doing it?  Sometimes we do things because we enjoy them and that’s okay IF we can afford it.  For example, if we have no debt, if we have some serious savings, and if we can easily live within our means.  But if we struggle with finances, we need to seriously slash those costs that yield no income.  Don’t fall into a trap of justifying anything.