Tag Archives: treasures

100 Years

On September 6, 2019, my husband’s Aunt June turned 100 years old.  She has outlived all her siblings now, yet she is not alone.  We live very close by, though she is in a nursing home, and we pick her up for church, then she comes to our house afterwards for lunch with Allen’s 93 year old dad and we have a great time visiting and catching up with the news events of the community and family.

She also has nieces and nephews who adore her and stay as active as they can from a long distance.  For her open house type birthday party we held for her, they came from Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and far eastern Missouri.  Over 80 people came to visit and she was animated and the life of the party.  June thrives amongst people and activity and she was still talking about it when Allen arrived back to the nursing home with her about 10pm.  Not surprisingly, she was so exhausted, that the next morning, she couldn’t be roused for church.  What a wonderful and exciting day for her.

I decorated her home (where we held the party) with treasures she had from her past.  Daughter, Jessica, before she left for teaching in Hanoi, Vietnam helped me with the travel display (June and her late husband, Bill, escorted tour groups all over the world from the late 70s through to early 90s (he passed away in fall of 1991), then she continued until she was 85!) and also found this lovely quilt pictured below.  We were so excited!  So i figured a way to display it for the party.

The quilt, as the sign says, was completed in 1946 and given to her and Bill as a wedding gift.  It features all of the extension clubs in the county as of that time along with all the members’ signatures embroidered.  What a thoughtful and clever gift.  Only one person of those listed on the quilt is still alive – Martha Murrell – who now lives in the same nursing home as June and just across the hall from one another.

June Lamme has been so important in our lives and our children’s lives, we are thankful for the opportunity to support her now.

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Unexpected “Treasures”

For some reason, farmers of old (and, sadly, probably some still) thought that throwing old metal farm implements, myriads of rolls of barbed wire or woven wire in ditches, along with old hedge posts would somehow magically make the ditch stop washing.  Nothing could be further from the truth!  However, it could be said that throwing trash in the ditch answers men’s idea of ‘cleaning’ sort of the ‘out of sight, out of mind’ that women simply cannot fathom.  It’s still there for goodness sake!

Blessed with incredibly fine weather and a wee bit of time and some great help last week and after owning this property for about 26 years, this 50 foot stretch of ditch had the metal pulled out.  Because of the junk, the water simply pools and won’t allow healing.  Once I graze the pasture down this winter with my cows, I’ll burn all the wood trash and cut down as many rubbish trees as necessary to allow this ditch/draw to grass over and heal, so erosion will STOP!

What a surprise to find these fine implements stacked alongside the ditch – most are in decent working order, though too antiquated to be useful except as yard ornaments.

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Numerous heavy rolls of woven wire with farm implements loaded on the back.  It took the three of us with pickup, machinery mover, tractor and loader about 3 hours to clean it out of the ditch.  Environmentally, it’s the right thing to do, but putting a pencil reveals high costs and no income side to this type farm improvement project.
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Son, Dallas, loads the old horse drawn seated one bottom plough.

 

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Two antique harrow sections; one of them is in excellent condition.
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Cute horse drawn cultivator.
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This is likely a walk behind one bottom plough.  It’s missing the wooden handles.
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One of at least 20 big rolls of woven wire buried in the mud and muck, this one even had small trees and multiflora rose grown up through.
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Brett and I worked together to wrap log chains through the center of each roll, Dallas pulled them out with the tractor, then smashed them flat with the front end loader.  Later, we would pack two or three of them in the loader and Dallas would load them onto the machinery mover (trailer).