Tag Archives: vaccinations

Gardasil Victim

This is my cousin, Heather (Falconer) Miller and her husband Cory’s, daughter, Lauren.

This is Lauren’s Story, she’s one of many Gardasil victims.

(There was a video out of the interview, but i cannot find it anymore)

“On November 22, 2016 our lives were changed forever. My healthy 13 year old was given a flu and HPV vaccination. I declined the HPV shot 4 times because I had a bad feeling about it and had read about healthy teens developing autoimmune diseases following this particular shot. We were told (by our pediatrician) nothing like that ever happens & that those girls were already going to get sick. “You can’t believe anything you read on the internet”, she said. My pediatrician insisted that she would get throat cancer from kissing if I did not give her this vaccine. I was NOT given INFORMED CONSENT, and will regret letting them give my daughter the Gardasil 9 shot for the rest of my life. After pulling her medical records I learned it was her 37th injection and the 51st vaccine that had been put into her body since birth.

Before the shot, Lauren was an elite athlete and an honor student. She played soccer on a highly competitive, regional level soccer team. She also played tennis, guitar, was active in our church, straight A student, and was a member of the national junior honor society. She had big dreams and a bright future ahead of her.�
After the shot, Lauren had an adverse reaction. She developed chronic fatigue and head-pain…every second of every day. She also told me, “Mom”, my brain isn’t working right”. She was trying to keep count of reps she was doing for a training exercise and her brain was unable to remember the numbers. She was diagnosed with mitochondria damage and still struggles with her short-term memory and processing information. Her headaches are usually between a 5-8. Ten being the most pain you can imagine or for example a bear tears your arm off. Nothing takes her pain away, not even prescription meds. We have tried everything under the sun these past 3 years to try to heal her body. She says the fatigue bothers her the worst. I asked her what it felt like and she said its like she hasn’t slept in 500 days. The vaccine also triggered her body to launch an attack on itself. At one point her ANA (Antinuclear Antibody) levels were 1:1280, which is an extremely alarming rate. She has since developed autoimmunity of her thyroid and it is likely that she will continue to develop multiple autoimmune disorders because of her reaction. She now has a 500% increased risk of cancer (based on studies) because of the cell damage she has endured. �
Lauren can no longer participate in any sports or extra activities. She can’t even play the guitar anymore because it makes her head hurt worse and her brain doesn’t function like it used to. Heat and physical activities make her feel worse as well. She had to stop taking the advanced classes that she would have taken.�
Her treatment and recovery plan are the focus of our daily lives. Hundreds of doctors appointments, blood test, scans, IV infusions, pills, supplements, and the extra burden of eating an organic diet that is free of gluten, dairy & refined sugar are just some of the things we continue to do to try to restore her health. We are grateful that her last ANA tests were negative. There are no days off when trying to heal from a vaccine injury. I will never stop defending her health.�
I have learned a lot these past few years. Nothing is one size fits all. My daughter is compound heterozygous for 2 SNP’s of the MTHFR gene. Because of this, she has methylation & detox deficiencies which put her at a high risk for vaccine reactions. Unfortunately, I didn’t learn about this until it was too late. Watching your child’s health and life be taken from them is soul crushing. This has affected our entire family and I am still grieving for the life that she once had.

If we are not given the right to choose what medical procedures are best for our families, then we are not living in a free land. Everything that Lauren has developed is a listed side-effect (on the package insert from the manufacturer) of the Gardasil vaccine. I had concerns that I addressed with my pediatrician that day, and I was told nothing like that ever happens. Parents deserve informed consent. Where there is a risk, there must be a choice. Thank you for taking to time to read Lauren’s story.

At the time we were interviewed for the VAXXED documentary I thought she was goin to recover with help from the IV infusions. However, when she went back to school and tried to play sports, her symptoms came back and then we learned about the autoimmunity. This is pretty common because autoimmune issues take several months or even years to develop after damage has occurred.

Today, Lauren continues to suffers from chronic fatigue, chronic head pain & short-term memory problems. She has also been diagnosed with autoimmunity to her thyroid, metabolic dysfunction & immune dysfunction since having the adverse reaction. She is able to attend school, but it’s much harder than is was before her injury. She is not able to do any of the extra activities that she once loved. �
We have been working non-stop since the beginning of 2017 to restore her health. I am so proud of her for not giving up. We are not defined by what happens to us, but by how we choose to respond. Lauren is tough as nails and a warrior, this has changed her and our lives so much. I am grateful for all that she can still do, and pray that she can continue to heal.”

With Heather Falconer Miller
Lauren’s Mom & Defender
Kansas City, MO

 
 
 
 

Working Cows and Calves Friday

The weather looks like it’s going to be perfect for pregnancy checking my cows and vaccinating late April through May born calves.  With daughter Jessica off teaching 1st grade this year in Hanoi, Vietnam, i’m short someone to do the tagging.  So that job gets shuffled between me and whoever is head catching the animals.  Not as efficient, but there is no one to pick up that job.  I do have most of the calf tags ready and most of the replacement tags for cows.

 

This peaceful video was taken Wednesday afternoon at my farm while i was up there working.  Happy cows and calves.

Meal for the Men

Allen is working his calves today and Monday (mine are tomorrow) – it’s time for their second round of vaccinations and some fall calving cows need pregnancy checking.  Weather is perfect except super windy.  My job is to prepare lunch for the guys for whenever they arrive.  It’s ready now (11:30), and i was notified that they’ll be in probably about 1p.  Hopefully, all will go smoothly.

For lunch:

  • Beef short ribs offered with BBQ sauce
  • Homegrown slow simmered green beans with onions and garlic
  • Paraguayan Corn Bread (this is a new recipe for me i’ve made a few times this week – adding this one to my lineup and will post recipe soon)
  • Deviled eggs laid by our silly old hens
  • Blackberry cobbler

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Paraguayan Corn Bread (Sopa Paraguaya)

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It was a challenge to fill a plate with neatly peeled eggs.  Although i set a couple dozen back, it was still not long enough for them to peel easily.  In other words, they are too fresh!

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Home picked blackberries with fresh ground wheat berries for the batter.  Yeah, and sugar, and honey, and butter, and milk, and baking powder, and cinnamon.

 

Pregnancy Check – 2018

Pregnancy check and calf vaccinations for fall 2018 are recorded history.  October 25, 2018 held on to become a pretty nice day.  Veterinarian was hour and half late, but with the changes i’d made in the corral which made it more user friendly, we still managed to finish before dark.  The changes shaved at least an hour off working time.

Results of preg check were far more favorable than i could have ever expected given the very hot, dry, droughty, short grass conditions.

135 cows and heifers were checked.

  • Open/Bred
  • 2/39 of the 2 year olds – 95% bred
  • 3/19 of the 3 years olds – 84% bred
  • 2/15 of the 4 year olds – 87% bred *
  • 0/1 of the 5 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/6 of the 6 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/20 of the 7 year olds – 100% bred
  • 1/21 of the 8 year olds – 95% bred
  • 2/8 of the 9 year olds – 75% bred
  • 0/1 of the 10 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/1 of the 11 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/1 of the 12 year olds – 100% bred
  • 0/3 of the 13 year olds – 100% bred

Totals – 10/135  = 7.4% open or 92.8% bred

THRILLED with this result even had there not been a drought and i hadn’t changed the breeding season.

Since i was going to Kenya this summer and because i cannot be out past the 15th of August to move the bulls away from the cows (because of severe ragweed allergy), i changed the breeding season from 17 July to 7 July and lopped off 12 days on the end.  In other words, last year breeding season was 17 july – 20 September, but this year is 6 July – 19 August.  Breeding season went from 65 days to 45 days.

According to gestation tables, this puts the first calves arriving April 14th and the last ones on May 28.  I do not like to start calving so early, but since the Corriente cows give such rich milk and combine with heat, humidity, and toxic endophyte fescue of late spring, it was a disaster the two years i calved them out in the mid-May to end of June time frame. (30% calf death loss due to scours despite major treatment).  Add in my allergies, i made the decision for my present season.  We can get some super nasty weather, however, in April, so time will tell.

Measuring for improvement

Cheers

tauna

*(these two young cows raised the biggest calves – not sustainable for my operation)

 

 

 

Sell Now or Sell Later

There has always been great debate about whether or not to sell open (not pregnant) cows in the fall at pregnancy check or turn the bull back in with them and see if they’ll breed for another season, then sell them pregnant.  Many trade publications will encourage producers to ‘add value’ to a cull cow, but i seriously question the validity of such endeavor, but then again, i’m not an expert with numbers, i’m just lazy and don’t want to be shifting and handling and sorting my cows more than necessary.

It’s easy enough to simply put numbers to the various practices, then make your favourite decision.

My first stumbling block with the concept of adding value to one of my cull cows has to do with passing off a potentially problem cow to my neighbor.  That doesn’t sound very neighborly or make good business since.  However, one could simply ‘add value’ by pouring the feed to the cow to make her fat and increasing the grade or value for slaughter.  It also could be justified by the fact that my management is super low input and most of my cows would thrive in another producer’s management style.

Let’s compare:

Pregnancy check in the fall reveals 10 open cows.  My cows all have a calf at side or they’d already be sold, so 14-30 days after the calves have received their vaccines, I’ll wean the calf by selling off the cow to slaughter.  She’s not going to be in the fattest condition because she’s nursing a nice calf and a non-fat cow will not bring top dollar.

For example, the different cow classes are as follows:

SLAUGHTER COWS:

  1. Breaking and Boning (75-85% lean) $47.50-$57.50
  2. High dressing $58.00-$67.00.
  3. Lean (85-90%) $44.00-$54.50

Cows in the fall nursing a calf will typically fall in the Lean or Breaking and Boning categories and this year are bringing about $43/cwt (hundredweight).  My cows are primarily Corriente or Corriente cross and will weigh about 800 lbs (by comparison and Angus or other beefier breed will weigh 1200 lbs, although she still may be thin and be in the same category).

 

OR

Keep the cow and turn the bull back with her and hope she gets bred – Let’s say there is 70% chance that she will.  So, we keep the cow until she is in the 2nd stage of pregnancy or about 5-6 months along.

Therefore, if she would bring $875/head as a P2 cow (and this would be a stretch if she is older than 5 or 6).

OR

Leave the bulls in with the cows an additional 20-30 days and hope that another 50% of the potentially open cows actually breed, then sell the bred cows that calved late as well as the open cows in mid-December.

Let’s compare:

10 $105 -$1,050 labor
10 $127 -$1,270 pasture costs
7 $875 $6,125 bred cows sold
3 $400 $1,200 open cows sold
$5,005  keep and sell in June
vs
5 $360 $1,800 open cows sold
5 $675 $3,375 bred cows sold
$5,175  sell in December
($170)

Things to consider.Interestingly, in my opinion, these numbers probably won’t change even if one leaves the bulls in for another 20 days, sort out the cows that have not calved by 10 June and selling them as ready to calve in the last trimester (P3).  In this part of the country (Missouri, USA) a summer calving P3 cow is not as desirable as a fall calving P2 even though i’ve credited her with more value in my chart above.

Leaving the bulls in an additional 20 days is advantage for me in that i avoid having to handle the cattle during ragweed allergy season.  My allergies are so bad, that this is a serious consideration.  However, the reality of bringing in the cows with baby calves and sorting off the one which haven’t calved yet is that it likely won’t happen and one would be right back to a 65 day calving season.  However, those cow numbers could be written down, paired up in the fall and then sold as pairs when animals are mustered in for preg check and calf vaccinations.

The point of changing the time and reducing the length of breeding season was to avoid ragweed allergy season.  However, i discovered that at least this year, i was unable to withstand the debilitating effects of ragweed as late as 1 September.   Also, the longer the calving season, the more inconvenient it is to shift the animals through a managed rotation.

Other alternative is to separate those open cows and a bull put in with them.  Disadvantage is that a separate herd must be maintained for 7 months.  Not really a feasible situation.

So, now that i’ve thought through the pros and cons of the various scenarios, especially solving the issue with allergies i will plan to leave the bulls in an additional 20 days, thereby hauling them out about 20 September.  This means, however, that the following spring that i’ll be dealing with an additional 20 days of baby calves to shift (yes, this is a pain in the butt) and be diligent to write down the numbers of those cows calving late so they can be sorted off during preg check in November.    If half of those late calvers go ahead and get bred, it will add dollars to my bottom line without adding much expense.  Most importantly, it solves the allergy issue.

WOTB – (working on the business)

Cheers

tauna

 

 

CIDRs In, CIDRs Out, then AI

Big ranch outfits often do timed AI, but we’ve never done this, so quite the experiment for us.  There is a lot of time and cattle handling involved which translates, of course, to more labor costs.  Time will tell if all this is really worth it.  We have hired a professional AI technicial to insert the CIDRS and do the AI (artificial insemination).

18 August – Mustered the cows and replacements heifers for CIDR placement to begin at 7am along with a Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccination.  Doug, the technician had a flat tire so was running about 30 minutes late.  Not a problem.  The cows sorted nicely and went through the chute with no problems.  We managed a pace of 67 cows per hour for a total of 3 1/2 hours from start of CIDR insertion to being finished.  Sorting of course, was started an hour earlier.  Weather was perfectly cloudy, cool, with rain starting after we finished!.

Allen was catching, Pat gave the shot, Doug AI'd with RIck preparing the straw and loading the AI gun. This was crucial in expediting the whole process.
Allen was catching, Pat gave the shot, Doug AI’d with RIck preparing the straw and loading the AI gun. This was crucial in expediting the whole process.  Dallas brought the cows quietly into the race.  I was sorting the cows from the calves (well, except for taking this photo!)

25 August – Mustered the cows and replacements heifers in again at 4:30 removal of the CIDRS in the cows which also received the lutalyse shot\.  Sorted off the replacement heifers and held in corral overnight.  A little warm starting here in the afternoon, but not too bad.  about 82F, but began to cool off quickly.  We were finished by 7:30p.

26 August – Removal of CIDRS in heifers at 7am. Also received a shot of lutalyse. Had a couple of calves to doctor, then let the whole mob down into the timber.

27 August – 6pm – went to muster the cows into the small lot by corral.  RIck had already unrolled 4 bales of good hay, but the cows had found their way out of the timber.  Took until 7:30 to get them in!  Note to self:  Leave the cows in the small lot with high quality hay rather than turning them out and having difficulty getting them back in.  My thoughts are that they are really tired of getting poked and prodded, so were quite reluctant to move back towards the corral and with all the hormones raging at this point, they are pretty distracted.

Doug Tenhouse, our AI technician is inserting the AI syring through the cervix and plunging the semen into the uterus.
Doug Tenhouse, our AI technician is inserting the AI syringe through the cervix and plunging the semen into the uterus.  This cow was being less than cooperative – normally, they stand up – there is no pain.

We finished about 12;30 pm and had AI’d 210 animals in five hours.  If I get 55% of the cows bred to Red Eddard, that’d be industry standard.  As expensive as this whole process is, I hope for better – only time will tell. The cows have all been inseminated with Red Eddard, a red Aberdeen Angus that was collected at Cogent and has been sold by Dunlouise Angus to another farmer.

AI 006
Four straws of Red Eddard were left over since there were a few cows that, for various reason, didn’t warrant the investment of being inseminated with expensive semen. These were put in Pat’s semen tank where we found we also had leftover Black Angus and Charolais semen from when we used to AI some 20 years ago. Maybe we’ll get it all used next year.

28 August – morning start at 7am with the cows; the heifers were held until last so that the timing is right for best chance of successful AI and conception for each group.  Cows should be AI’d 60-66 hours after CIDR removal and heifers about 54-60 hours.  Both receiving a second Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) shot.  A bit late getting started.  Cows were, not surprisingly, reluctant to go into the corral, but at last they made it.  We started about 7:30 am again.  Everything went very well today, however, and we finished about 12:30pm.

Potential recip (recipient) cows. If all goes as hoped, 10 of these will become proud surrogate mommas of native Aberdeen Angus calves.
Potential recip (recipient) cows. If all goes as hoped, 10 of these will become proud surrogate mommas of native Aberdeen Angus calves.

I made my final selection of cows to use for embryo transplant work

and only ended up with 17 for 10 embryos.  Hopefully, enough cows will be in standing heat this coming week and none fall out for other reasons, so that each of 10 embryos will have a new home inside a momma’s womb.  AND remain viable.

ET cows were hauled home and now I spend time each day, all day checking for standing heat and writing down the time and the cow’s ear tag number.  All cows will be hauled to Trans-Ova in Chillicothe, MO on the 4th of September for ET.  HOPE, HOPE, HOPE i get some live calves out of those embryos.  It’s SO expensive.

Dallas and I dewormed the sheep in the late afternoon – had just done it 20 days ago, but sheep were dying!  I found out that the previous owner of these sheep had already put his own flock on an 18 day deworming schedule.  Add this to the growing list of reasons why i’m selling off the sheep – more work, more expense, more loss.

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna

Red Eddard - a native born Scottish Aberdeen Angus bred by Dunlouise Angus, Kingston Farms, Forfar, Angus County, Scotland
Red Eddard – a native born Scottish Aberdeen Angus bred by Dunlouise Angus, Kingston Farms, Forfar, Angus County, Scotland

Working Day at Last

Tuesday started early with rising before dawn.  The vet was coming about 8:30am, so we needed to have the cows and calves mustered and sorted before then.  We were running a bit late, but thankfully, so was the vet, so that all worked out.  We got started with the first calf through the chute about 9:30 am and finished about 2:30pm, with less than half an hour for pizza from PB5 that Allen and his dad brought up for us all.

All the cows and calves moving into the corral.
All the cows and calves moving into the corral.

When i say that the calves were worked, this means they are receiving their vaccinations:  IBR-BVD-PI3, BRSV and 7-way blackleg, the heifers are calf-hooded (OCV vaccine).  All are dehorned if necessary, except for the roping calves and bull calves are castrated.  I also give them an ID ear tag.  It’s quite a deal for the calves, but we use Bud Williams’ low stress handling and this keeps any stress to a very minimum.  All the animals stay very quiet, which certainly cuts down on accidents.  I believe the only injury was Dallas getting kicked by a baby calf.  Still hurts, though. Their tiny hooves can be sharp enough to cut.

Chowing down!
Chowing down!

After the vet and his helper from Brookfield Veterinarian Clinic,left, we tagged a few cows which had lost ear tags.  All in all, it was a very low key, quiet event.  Very thankful.

Cows and calves quietly shifting to their overnight paddock.  They have plenty of hay on offer since the grass is just not growing yet!
Cows and calves quietly shifting to their overnight paddock. They have plenty of hay on offer since the grass is just not growing yet!

We arrived home by 5:30 after checking the stock and moving equipment home, after which I had those lambs to feed – boy were they hungry!.  Then it was off to put the testicles (Rocky Mountain oysters) in John’s frig, then up to Purdin to pick up milk.

One more lamb feeding just before dark and put them to bed.  Shower and bed!

All the Best!

tauna